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Cast Iron cookware and "seasoning"

Discussion in 'Food Forum' started by MeanMike, Oct 19, 2004.

  1. MeanMike

    MeanMike

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    From what i understand.. in order to create a natural non stick area on cast iron cookware.. you do something called seasoning.. which is something like oiling the pan and baking it numerous times?

    Does anyone have any further information on how to "season" cast iron cookware?
     
  2. Santa CruZin

    Santa CruZin RIP Mr. Mayor

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    I rub in some peanut oil once in a while, but I don't do any thermal cycling beyond normal use of the pans. I also do this to a heavy aluminum wok that's teflon coated. Necessary? I dunno. Just habit...
     

  3. Stephen

    Stephen Hola! Millennium Member

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    A few months ago we bought a Lodge iron skillet and here's what I did:

    Washed the skillet in warm/hot soapy water - rinse off VERY well.

    Towel dry.

    Using a paper towel I took some Crisco (stick) and with the paper towel smeared the Crisco over the entire pan.

    Wipe off excess.

    Place pan on the lower rack of your a pre-heated 350* oven for about 60 minutes.

    Switch off the oven with the pan still in the oven and allow to cool.

    Hmm... I just looked and found this after all of that typing:

    http://www.lodgemfg.com/usecare1.asp

    Hope this helps.
     
  4. MeanMike

    MeanMike

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    perfect, thanks!
     
  5. 308endurdebate

    308endurdebate

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    Just make sure you have a very good exhaust hood and open windows if you use the oven ... b/c the smoke genereated by the baking crisco will stink. Otherwise, I prefer to do it outside, either in the grill or over a propane stove. Same thing though.

    -k
     
  6. MeanMike

    MeanMike

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    i live on the 4th floor.. ill just wait for a windy day ;P
     
  7. Santa CruZin

    Santa CruZin RIP Mr. Mayor

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    You might want to dig around the net regarding the safety of smoke from Crisco. I've wrecked a couple pans and a couple grills with the stuff...
     
  8. Sixgun_Symphony

    Sixgun_Symphony NRA4EVR

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    You gotta use high heat the first few times, all the way up.

    There will be lots of smoke, so open the windows, turn on a fan, and take the batteries out of the smoke alarm.

    The cast iron cookware will come out black. Repeat several times at 350 degrees.
     
  9. 4sarge

    4sarge Millennium Member

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    The only thing that I can add is that we use lard instead of Crisco. Yes, you still can find it in some groceries. Lard is still used in some recipes but most modern cook books have omitted it totally. May have to check in a grocery that caters to Hispanic or other minorities to find it. Ditto on the high heat and watch the smoke. It's been a while since we've had any new unseasoned cookware to do but I'm sure that there was some smoke. Black is the color that which you wish to achieve for your cookware. Good Cooking ;)