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I often here this is an unsafe method of carry, but I don't hear anybody really giving a good argument as to why it's unsafe. If we're talking about a series 80 1911, it's virtually impossible for it to go off while carrying it in a proper holster. It just won't happen. You also have the grip safety. Is the danger of carrying a 1911 in condition zero come from that the trigger is so light that in drawing the pistol from the holster or holstering it, there's a chance somebody might accidently squeeze off a round due to the light trigger? Just would like to hear your thoughts thanks.
 

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I carry my 1911 in cond. 1 cocked and locked, it would scare me to carry with the safety off
 

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I often here this is an unsafe method of carry, but I don't hear anybody really giving a good argument as to why it's unsafe. If we're talking about a series 80 1911, it's virtually impossible for it to go off while carrying it in a proper holster. It just won't happen. You also have the grip safety. Is the danger of carrying a 1911 in condition zero come from that the trigger is so light that in drawing the pistol from the holster or holstering it, there's a chance somebody might accidently squeeze off a round due to the light trigger? Just would like to hear your thoughts thanks.
As long as nothing depresses the trigger it is not going off. If it was me I might place the manual safety on while holstering and only release it when the gun is being carried. Then I would reengage the safety before removing the gun from my holster. The reason for this would be that the grips safety is easy to depress while holstering and drawing. I would not want my trigger snagging anything when being holstered.
 

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Personally, I could give a rats arse what John Browning thought of my gun choice.

Same as what I care what Thomas Edison thinks of my light bulbs, or Henry Ford I thinks of my F350. I don't give a sheet what someone dead for darn near a century thinks. Mostly cause he ain't thinking a dang thing...HE'S DEAD.

It's a harsh statement, but true.
 

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I'd say that it would be perfectly safe.

Just because it has a thumb safety doesn't mean you have to use it.

Nobody complains about pinned grip safeties.

The thumb and grip safeties got on my nerves so much I decided the 1911 wasn't for me...
 

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Personally, I could give a rats arse what John Browning thought of my gun choice.

Same as what I care what Thomas Edison thinks of my light bulbs, or Henry Ford I thinks of my F350. I don't give a sheet what someone dead for darn near a century thinks. Mostly cause he ain't thinking a dang thing...HE'S DEAD.

It's a harsh statement, but true.
Very true and honest statement.
 

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IMO you need the TS to lock the sear in place when cocked. If you ain't going to use a TS then I think you should have a 80 or Schwartz safety and have the sear leg set extremely high. Or I really think you should go with another handgun design!!
 

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The big problem with condition zero is reholstering. Unless you are holding the gun in a finky way the grip safety will be depressed. This means that nice light, short trigger you like will now work against you. If it hits the edge of a holster or any other object you could be in trouble. Sure on the range or in the safety of your own house it might be fine. Have some ahole start throwing rounds at you or maybe you just shot someone and now try and reholster smoothly.

Remember Glocks have the little lever in the trigger to try to prevent the reholster AD. They also have much longer trigger pull.


Now let's look at JMB and the safeties. The Army wanted them. JMB just wanted people to carry it condition two or three, maybe condition 0.5. Who knows for sure? He made it the way the Army wanted it. I suspect the Army wanted a grip safety so that their people would have a good grip on it before it fired. They also probably wanted the safety lever to be able to reholster in a hurry.

If it really nuts you up to have to disengage a safety lever DONT BUY A 1911!

Just like when I went to SIG armorer's school. The instructor was talking about clowns at one department he taught at running around with SIGs with their hammers cocked. If yo want a light single action trigger BUY A 1911.
 

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The prototypes for the M1911 didn't have safety levers. Perhaps the inventor himself knew a thing or two about the gun he wanted to make?
Mr Browning didn't write the mil spec, he wanted to make the gun the customer wanted to buy.
He originally designed a .38 auto for Colt.
When the Army got interested, they made it clear they wanted a .45.
He designed a .45 auto (1905).
The Army liked the grip safety on the Luger.
He added a grip safety (1907).
The Army wanted a more durable gun.
He went from the twin link action to the single link tilting barrel (1909).
The Army wanted a more "naturally pointing" gun.
He made the grip angle 17 degrees (1910).
The Army wanted a thumb safety.
He added a thumb safety (1911).
The Army wanted thousands and thousands just like that.
 

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No measurable difference in time than just drawing. The only danger is forgetting to under duress.
That's where proper training and repetition come into play. Safety comes off as weapon is presented to target. Finger off of trigger until ready to fire. If you don't take the safety off when you present, there is a danger of forgetting. Taking the weapon off safe is part of the draw stroke.
The safety is always placed on safe when reholstering and finger out of trigger guard.

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In 1912, the U.S. Army published a manual of arms for the 1911 pistol.

In that manual, the user was strongly cautioned to NOT carry the pistol with a round in the chamber and the hammer cocked and locked.

Presumably, they arrived at this recommendation due to pragmatic evidence (i.e. some privates, somewhere with holes in their legs).

However, it doesn't make sense to carry a duty weapon in that condition, does it?

That's why Gaston is a local favorite.
 
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