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Car battery

Discussion in 'The Okie Corral' started by glockrod, Oct 24, 2012.

  1. glockrod

    glockrod NRA-Endow. Life

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    My battery died in my '06 Toyota Tundra yesterday. Well, it was over 6 years old, so I am a bit lucky.

    I replaced it with the biggest battery that would fit - a 710 CCA battery from Advance Auto(it was nearest AND I had a coupon!)

    My question is: Is my theory of putting the biggest batt that fits it it sound logic?
    Is there any problem that could occur?
    Will my alternator even have the output to charge it fully?

    What say, you GT early risers.
     
  2. Sporaticus

    Sporaticus Aw sheet main

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    Other than burning out the gonkulator, I wouldn't think so. The big question is, how much difference between the recommended battery and the one you put in it?
     

  3. glockrod

    glockrod NRA-Endow. Life

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    I think what came in it from the factory was about 550-600 CCA.

    All the standard size batteries I found on the internet were 600-640 CCA and the one I bought was 710.

    The dead one was only putting out @210+ and was barely able to turn the motor.

    It seems that it would be harder on the alternator to have the weak battery than one too big, but I just cant remember. Not to mention, I have no idea if modern computer cars are more sensitive than older cars.

    So, that's why I am here asking.
     
  4. Sporaticus

    Sporaticus Aw sheet main

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    I wouldn't think it is a problem, and probably a plus.
     
    Last edited: Oct 24, 2012
  5. sourdough44

    sourdough44

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    I don't think it matters much, especially in SC. It may be more of an issue in ND with winter temps.
     
  6. SC Tiger

    SC Tiger Jive Tiger

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    You should be fine. Never thought about the alternator issue but I don't think it would be a big deal. Worst case is it will charge it to 600 CCA but I think they will fully charge just about anything.

    What will blow your mind is that sometimes the physically biggest battery isn't the most powerful.
     
  7. TheExplorer

    TheExplorer

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    No harm, it's just excess weight.
     
  8. Viper16

    Viper16

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    I always get a step up on the size from the OEM...only because during the occasion it does it cold...in the single digits...I want it to start with no issues.
     
  9. Iron bottom

    Iron bottom

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    You did fine. This seems to eliminate a lot of electrical problems. I heard this when I was a kid about driving age. I've always bought the largest battery with the most reserve I could fit in the battery holder. The reserve is the amount of time the battery will run the safety equipment such as headlights, wipers and flashers if the alternator quits.

    I ran a 1996 F150 4X4 for 13 yrs. and 251,000 miles before someone knocked me off the interstate. That F150 had every electrical item that was on it when I bought it new still installed and working, except for a headlight bulb and some coolant temp sensor on the engine.

    The alternator should only see the load it was seeing before you changed the battery, and the load should not change unless you add something. Nothing to worry about.

    I've heard low voltage is hard on automotive computer systems. Like the engine computer may go crazy when the voltage is low.

    No starter problems, no alternator problems, no heat and ac problems, no electric window problems, no door lock problems, no engine problems except for that sensor, ect.

    I hated to see that old truck go.
     
    Last edited: Oct 24, 2012
  10. certifiedfunds

    certifiedfunds Tewwowist

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    It will harm your car in the same way putting a larger fuel tank would.
     
  11. byf43

    byf43 NRA Life Member

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    When you put in a 'larger capacity' battery, the way I understand it, is that more 'plates' are put in the battery, and there is less room for electrolite (so-called 'acid', from days of old).

    Because of less 'space', when the plates start 'decomposing' (can't remember the proper term), there is more chance of the plates 'shorting out', and the battery will 'die' sooner.
    (This is especially true with the really high CCA rated batteries. . . . like the 1,000 CCA units, etc.)

    As for hurting the charging system. . . . nah. Non issue.
    The alternator puts out a given amount of current (amps), and the regulator prevents any overcharging.

    The problem would be that the manufacturer (or maybe a repair shop) put in a lower rated alternator than what you need.
    (I've seen this. . . .especially on GMs, in the early/mid-1980s!)
     
    Last edited: Oct 24, 2012
  12. CitizenOfDreams

    CitizenOfDreams

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    The alternator will be just fine. If you look under the hood of a big truck (I'm talking Kenworth, not Nissan Titan), you will see pretty much the same alternator happily charging a pack of batteries six times bigger than your car's.