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Protective G'pa
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949 Posts
Hip dysplasia is genetic, if the ball and socket are shallow then the muscles have to work harder to keep things together. If the ball and socket are shallower, then there is less bearing surface between the ball and socket so the wear is quicker.

Missy strained her knee playing several weeks ago. The vet wanted to take x-rays to check the knee out and said he would do a 2 for 1 shot of both hind knees getting the hips in the shot too. Upshot was that the knee was fine but she did have hip dyspasia. His advise was to give her a Glucosamine/Chondroitin tablet every day and to restrict her activities to avoid stressing the hip joints while keeping her active in terms of walking and running to build up the muscles.

He said most HD damage is caused during the developing years because the body is still growing and stretching so it is unable to keep up with the damage caused through straining the hip joints, ie. once it is damaged it takes time for it to heal, but the dog is too active too soon so the joint never fully heals. So keep the rough play to a minimum and let her body grow into its final size while strengthening the muscles as much as possible. This will reduce the impact of the HD as she gets older.

I am feeding Missy Blue Buffalo Large Breed Puppy now. I was feeding her Nutro Large Breed Puppy up until just a week before she hurt her knee. After making the change her weight dropped about 4 lbs until I got the amount right. Now she is putting on about 1 lb a week. Vet agreed that she will grow to whatever final size she is meant to be, but if I control the diet as much as possible to keep her on the light side until her body finishes growing it will keep much of the strain off the hip joints.
 

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Protective G'pa
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949 Posts
Some light running should not create a problem. The damaging part to HD is side impact / flexing. Making sudden turns, slides or other movements that require the hip to deal with lateral stresses. We still see a bit of it with Missy if she makes a sudden turn to go after one of the cats or spies a rabbit off to the side and makes a lunge sideways. If I slow her down and give her time to walk it off, she is usually pretty good. Her major damage came while playing with some other dogs and she got bowled over sideways.
 

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Protective G'pa
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949 Posts
Think of it in human terms. Turning at a walking pace does not stress you. Trying to make the same turn at high speed puts a lot more pressure on your joints. If your foot slips on something or catches on something you feel that stress instantly sometimes causing major damage to yourself. It is the same thing for your puppy.
 
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