Glock Talk banner
1 - 20 of 49 Posts

·
Private side
Joined
·
13,563 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
… even contemplating buying a well worn Winchester 1897? I know it’s going to take some cash to get it back to working order, much less to how I want it to look.
Maybe I just send it to Berto to be redone? I think I blame him for this retro phase. The gun was made in 1918 and there’s not a bunch of bluing left. It looks like someone used steel wool on it and the stock is cracked but I just picture it and either my old 1911 or my 1903 or 1908 making a good film noir detective pairing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20,169 Posts
Can someone tell me why I’m… … even contemplating buying a well worn Winchester 1897?
Did you watch much tv as a kid? Some of this stuff kind of gets ingrained from watching the Hollywood Oracle.

 

·
Private side
Joined
·
13,563 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Did you watch much tv as a kid? Some of this stuff kind of gets ingrained from watching the Hollywood Oracle.
If I had to point to any gun related media that affected my gun collecting and carrying habits it would be the 1980s, Jerry Ahern penned, Survivalist series. That’s the reason a Colt Python was my first revolver and a Browning Hi Power was my first semiauto.

I really think I just want a retro style cop/detective pairing. Of course that means I need some new holsters and ….

Don’t tell my wife.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
917 Posts
I think there is a sense of nostalgia for us older people. We've watched movies and seen magazine ads with old firearms that were out of production before we were born. And maybe some of us have memories of shooting these with a family member when we were kids.
For me, it's an obsession with 1903 Springfield rifles. My grandfather carried one in WW2 Europe, my father trained with one in basic and shot one for 25+ years in NRA High Power, and I took my first deer with one of Dad's '03 rifles.
I now have 17 of them in the collection- custom, original, and competition variations.
@BamaTrooper
Go for it! I know how you feel.
 

·
Señor Mombo
Joined
·
2,872 Posts
'97 Winchester shotguns are complicated beasts. There are a few 'smiths who specialize in bringing them back to life. They notoriously break during matches, so most folks who use them bring several (!) to a match. They can be smooth as silk if done-up right. Their "virtue" is that John Browning designed them to slam fire as they were to be used as trench clearing weapons. They can be very fast in the hands of a competent shooter. I have two: a Norinco done up by Squibber in Casa Grande, and a solid frame Winchester done by Palo Verde in Scottsdale. They have gone way up in value.
 
  • Like
Reactions: mj9mm

·
Registered
Joined
·
27,576 Posts
… even contemplating buying a well worn Winchester 1897? I know it’s going to take some cash to get it back to working order, much less to how I want it to look.
Maybe I just send it to Berto to be redone? I think I blame him for this retro phase. The gun was made in 1918 and there’s not a bunch of bluing left. It looks like someone used steel wool on it and the stock is cracked but I just picture it and either my old 1911 or my 1903 or 1908 making a good film noir detective pairing.
Because you can???
 

·
Lean & Mean
Joined
·
16,594 Posts
… even contemplating buying a well worn Winchester 1897? I know it’s going to take some cash to get it back to working order, much less to how I want it to look.
Maybe I just send it to Berto to be redone? I think I blame him for this retro phase. The gun was made in 1918 and there’s not a bunch of bluing left. It looks like someone used steel wool on it and the stock is cracked but I just picture it and either my old 1911 or my 1903 or 1908 making a good film noir detective pairing.
Just remember that 1918 production won't be 2 3/4". Actually even the ones from the 1930s may be a bit weird with the chamber size.
 
  • Sad
Reactions: Bradley T

·
Registered
Joined
·
368 Posts
There's just something very special about a lever action rifle.
1897 Winchester is a shotgun.

… even contemplating buying a well worn Winchester 1897? I know it’s going to take some cash to get it back to working order, much less to how I want it to look.
Maybe I just send it to Berto to be redone? I think I blame him for this retro phase. The gun was made in 1918 and there’s not a bunch of bluing left. It looks like someone used steel wool on it and the stock is cracked but I just picture it and either my old 1911 or my 1903 or 1908 making a good film noir detective pairing.
Because nostalgia is cool and it is always a good thing to bring an old and abused firearms back to life


 

·
Private side
Joined
·
13,563 Posts
Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Just remember that 1918 production won't be 2 3/4". Actually even the ones from the 1930s may be a bit weird with the chamber size.
Would a later barrel fit and let me use 2 3/4 shells? If so I’d like to change it so I could shoot the cheap skeet loads.
If I found period correct rifle I’d be the slowest 3 gun shooter in the local match.
 
1 - 20 of 49 Posts
Top