Campfire Regulation in the Backcountry (West)

Discussion in 'The Okie Corral' started by IvanVic, Jan 24, 2017.

  1. IvanVic

    IvanVic

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    My wife and I are planning a trip to Utah and I never realized how hard it was to find a place you're allowed to have a campfire - especially in March which I assumed would not be an issue. I assumed fire restrictions would be in place during the summer, but was surprised to see them banned year round. They're only permitted in the public campgrounds where there are RVs and lots of other people. We are looking for dispersed camping and have already reserved a spot in Zion along the trail, but would like to find a second location where we can have a fire.

    Has anyone done a lot of backpacking in the area (between Vegas and Salt Lake) that might have recommendations? I realize the time of year (March) limits our options. I've been using Alltrails.com
     
    Last edited: Jan 24, 2017
  2. UncleWT

    UncleWT

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    When I was younger, less responsible, and far enough into the backcountry I would just have a small fire no matter what the rules were. Then when I was 24 I watched a forest fire eat a large part of the Montana countryside that I loved. I guess that I hadn't really realized why the rules were so strict. Now I'm perfectly happy with a camp stove, and sometimes even if a fire is permitted I decide to just use the stove due to the fact that I'm just not comfortable burning for whatever reason. I hope you find the site you're looking for that allows backcountry fires, but if you don't I'd be glad to suggest some camp stoves.
     
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  3. HarlDane

    HarlDane

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    I can't help you out with locations as I camp in the Sierras.

    We've resorted to bringing along a propane fire pit (legally it's a stove as it has an on/off switch) on our trips. It's not quite the same as a crackling fire, but it beats sitting around a lantern at night in camp and my clothes don't stink like smoke when I get home.
     
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  4. r3dot

    r3dot

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    Very few, if any, national parks allow ground fires in the backcountry. It really does suck, because what's camping without a fire? Look into state parks for that. Most all here allow them.
     
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  5. UncleWT

    UncleWT

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    National Forests are also great places to camp with fewer restrictions than National Parks. We have to remember, a lot of National Parks aren't owned by us anymore so we really don't have much say on what happens in them.
     
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  6. Terlingueno

    Terlingueno

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    Explain this untruth, fib, falsification, fabrication, invention, fiction, story, cock-and-bull story, flight of fancy; tall tale, fairy tale, whopper , in detail please
     
    Last edited: Jan 24, 2017
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  7. canis latrans

    canis latrans

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    if you start a wildfire, whether by accident or not, you may be held liable for the entire extinction costs.

    and you don't want THAT!
     
  8. flyover

    flyover

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    I belief he is referring to this:
    http://www.nationalcenter.org/NPA341.html

    From the article:
    In 1972, our government signed the United Nations' World Heritage Treaty, a treaty that creates "World Heritage Sites" and Biosphere Reserves." Selected for their cultural, historical or natural significance, national governments are obligated to protect these landmarks under U.N. mandate.1 Since 1972, 68 percent of all U.S. national parks, monuments and preserves have been designated as World Heritage Sites.


    If you have been to some of the parks, the signage will show this:

    [​IMG]
     
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  9. Terlingueno

    Terlingueno

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    I work in one, and worked in another of "those" parks, and there are no blue berets or helmets, nor is their any UN anything. My paychecks come from the US Treasury.
    The idea that anyone other than the US "owns" the parks, is simply level 9 terminal ignorance.
     
    Last edited: Jan 24, 2017
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  10. UncleWT

    UncleWT

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    There is a loss of national sovereignty, but we maintain the ability to manage the area so long as we follow certain rules.
     
  11. Terlingueno

    Terlingueno

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    Really? Ya think?
    How 'bout some real cites that show that.Not the tripe from the post above that even gives conspiracy theorists a bad name.
     
  12. UncleWT

    UncleWT

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    What sites will you accept as cites? Or do you want books?
     
  13. UncleWT

    UncleWT

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    If you go to this page and download the document in your preferred language you'll be able to read the rules for management and how they are chosen. They are not chosen solely by Americans. The fact that America no longer makes all the rules means that we've lost sovereignty. http://whc.unesco.org/en/guidelines/ The download is bulky, sorry.
     
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  14. Batesmotel

    Batesmotel

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    Who said they are banned? I'm in Utah. We run fires all the time. Just depends on fire danger at the time. Just check with the proposer agency who manages that land. Forest service, park service, BLM, state etc. March is pretty easy in most of the state.
     
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  15. UtahIrishman

    UtahIrishman BLR

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    This has been my experience here as well.
     
  16. UncleWT

    UncleWT

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    The last time (and only time) I camped in Utah I actually used the Utah.com site to help with the beginning stages of planning the trip. I didn't know anything about Utah going in.
     
  17. Kingarthurhk

    Kingarthurhk Isaiah 53:4-9

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    Either way, having lived with mountains and deserts before, you need at least two changes of clothes, light clothes during the day, and cold weather gear a night, summer or not. The mountains even in summer can give you hyperthermia. The choice between hyperthermia and starting a fire, I am starting a fire. If you are worried about safety, try a Dakota Fire hole, it creates an invective fire you can cook over, but if you can redirect it's heat onto some rocks and reflecting back to you from some rocks, at least you have a safer fire, that is underground rather than above group. And other than the potential reflective glow against a rock face, rather stealthy too.
     
  18. IvanVic

    IvanVic

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    In Zion? It's on their website, and I called the park to confirm. We plan on bringing a camp stove, since they are permitted in the park. I have an emberlit too, but technically it's a wood burning stove. I know you can have fires in unregulated areas outside of national parks. Any thoughts on places to check out?


    The penalty for getting caught can be steep. Not worth the risk IMO, unless it was an emergency. As far as the weather, we have the proper gear. Been camping in cold weather since I was young. We will be in the desert region of Zion, which can still be cold in March but not as bad as you'd have at higher elevation.
     
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  19. tjpet

    tjpet

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    Obviously you're going to Zion for the scenery. But if you just want to hike in wild mountainous country utah has great national forests that would fit the bill. There's so much blm ground out here that you can always find a place to get away.
    Just remember that March can be one cold, wet, windy month out this west. Summer in utah is June, July and August.
     
  20. Batesmotel

    Batesmotel

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    Each park, forest, monument Etc. can have different regs. Places like Zion will be stoves only in good weather no open flame period in high fire danger periods outside of improved campsites.

    Utah is second only to Nevada in the amount of BLM and other public lands. There are too many nice places besides parks etc. to list. Look at BLM land just outside of the parks. Also hit county specific websites.