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Camera question...

Discussion in 'The Okie Corral' started by paynter2, Apr 28, 2012.

  1. paynter2

    paynter2 It ain't over Millennium Member

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    I have a Nikon COOLPIX camera. It has a 3.6 zoom and 14.0 megapixels. I only bought it to take pictures of fish I catch and occasional pics of things I'll sell on-line or pics of day-to-day things.

    I know next to nothing about cameras - they're so simple to use (now days) that I don't need to know much. Turn it on and shoot a pic.

    But, when I want to email a pic or load it to a web site, the 14MP seems to be overkill. It is hard to load - too much data. This may be due to my slow DSL - I don't know.

    Cameras are cheap - should I just buy another camera - maybe 7-8MP? Maybe I can buy software to help with this issue.

    I need to get a new cell phone. But, I just want a tracphone - I don't use it much and I want just a simple phone. I don't want a camera phone.

    Anyone with camera knowledge have any advice? Thanks. :wavey:
     
  2. TheExplorer

    TheExplorer

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    Your camera should have resolution settings. The reason why the file is so large is because you are taking them at the highest resolution setting possible. The only way around this to take take lower res photos. Check the manual or go to the manufacturer website and download it.
     

  3. czsmithGT

    czsmithGT

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    I'm not familiar with your camera specifically but all these types f cameras I have seen have a menu that allows you to select lower resolutions. You will get smaller files and more pictures available on your mrmory card. Check your users manual. You can probably select a default resolution that will do exactly what you want.

    Another thing you can do is get a cheap or free photo editing program and "downsize" pictures you want to email or sent to the web.
     
  4. Highspeedlane

    Highspeedlane NRA Life Member

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    As mentioned above, virtually all digital cameras permit you to dial down the resolution for web sized or lower resolution images. Look into your owners manual for the specific setting process.
     
  5. paynter2

    paynter2 It ain't over Millennium Member

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    Thanks guys - I told you I know nothing about cameras. I bought it at Walmart and told the guy I wanted something that would take good pictures and would be easy to use.

    I'll look up the settings in the manual. What's a better source of info than GT! :wavey:
     
  6. czsmithGT

    czsmithGT

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    For pictures you know will only be used on the web or a computer display and you won't want to crop, something like 800 by 600 pixels would work. That would make much smaller files than you get at full resolution. It probably wouldn't hurt to set your default resolution a littler higher to give yourself some room to edit or give a full screen display of the picture on monitors of higher resolution.
     
  7. Hummer

    Hummer Big Member

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    Always resize high resolution photos before sending.

    I shoot most everything at the highest resolution, then use Photoshop Elements to edit and downsize the image for e-mailing and web posting.

    My 16.3 megapixel camera produces file sizes about 6-8 megabytes, way too large for most e-mailing and web use. I resize to about 800 pixels wide resulting in file sizes around 250 kilobytes, which downloads quickly and looks good on most computer screens.
     
  8. FL Airedale

    FL Airedale Dog Breath

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    I find it much easier to leave the camera on Hi Def and just resize the photos on the computer.
     
  9. MtBaldy

    MtBaldy Obie Wan, RIP

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    Best thing to do is take all pictures at highest resolution and then use software to size them down. You can always make a high resoulution photo smaller but you can't go the other way.

    Two free apps that will do what you need are:

    Irfanview- basically a photo viewer but has some editing capability.

    www.irfanview.com

    Gimp- a full featured photo editing application with capabilities similar to Photoshop.

    Windows installer here:

    http://gimp-win.sourceforge.net/stable.html
     
  10. Jason D

    Jason D INFRINGED Silver Member Millennium Member

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    I second IRFAN.
    It's a great program and easy to use. You will have no problem taking a large picture and making it smaller. I would make sure you save them to separate folders though, so you can retain the full sized photo.
     
  11. Hokie

    Hokie NRA Member

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    For on screen viewing then 72 pixels/inch is fine and will reduce the size. If you want to print then you will want more pixels/inch.
     
  12. 686Owner

    686Owner NRA Life Member

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    Pixels per inch is a meaningless setting unless you are printing, and then the software will take care of it for you. On screen, a pixel is a pixel.