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Cabela Tree Strands

Discussion in 'Hunting, Fishing & Camping' started by noway, Oct 21, 2003.

  1. noway

    noway

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    Can any of you deer hunters suggest a good portable lite weight and easy to setup tree stand that straps to the tree without the use of spikes or nails?

    I'm looking at a few in Cabela's catalog that are running around $69-$179 dollars. I'm not to much concern with comfort and just like to get my sorry *** off the ground to get a bigger view.
     
  2. TScottW99

    TScottW99 NRA Life Member

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    Here's a nice little hang on... Loggy Hang On

    I have used this one before and liked it. Found this sale last night and am going to order one for myself.
     

  3. noway

    noway

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    Interesting, I'm assuming you secure it with straps and then climb the tree? is their a minimum size ( dia ) tree for this?

    problem in my next of the woods, trees are very thin. At best if you go up in the central parts you might find a solid oak to hug but for the better part it's all slim Pine.

    p.s>Nice website , I'm currently eyeballing some others stands mainly the Ol Man 16' ladder stand.

    One question else for others what type of footing is normal on these ladder stands and how do they stand up in soft dirt/sand?
     
  4. TScottW99

    TScottW99 NRA Life Member

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    I just hung two up this weekend. Both on oaks. One tree wasn't too big, proably 3 1/2' diameter where the stand was put, the other oak was a couple feet bigger. I use removable tree steps by API. I like them alot! You screw a lag bolt into the tree with a ratchet then slip the step on, take them off when you are done, keep your stand locked and hopefully it's safe. ;)

    I've never used a store bought ladder stand, but have several friends that won't use anything but an Ol' Man stand, they love them.
     
  5. noway

    noway

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    The only thing down here is it is illegal to use lag or spike bolts in trees.

    They try to discourage folks from harming the trees.:(

    So that pretty leaves you with one of 2 options

    1> ladder stands


    2> or self-supporting stands


    bummer
     
  6. Garweh

    Garweh CLM

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    Most of the climbing tree stands require trees between 8 and 20 inches in DIAMETER (circumference of 24+ to 60+ inches). I just purchased a Summit Viper XLS from Cabelas, expensive but worth it--well built, easy to assemble, easy to climb, good safety harness/line. Follow the directions and you should not have any problems!
     
  7. BrianDamage

    BrianDamage YouTalkin'ToMe?

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    Big mistake.

    That was my attitude when I started hunting 4 years ago. I bought a Hunter's View lock-on stand, because it was cheap.

    Well, guess what?

    If you aren't comfortable, you can't sit still.
    If you can't still, you WILL be seen by deer.


    Less than 2 months in to the season, went out and bought a Summit Viper Extreme XLS and could not be happier. I also have the Cobra and like it for bowhunting.
     
  8. rfb45colt

    rfb45colt safe-cracker

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    If the trees in your hunting area are mostly small diameter, like you said, a ladder stand might be best. It will give you more options on stand placement than a hang-on or climber. Both require a bigger tree than a ladder, and a climber requires a tree without many branches under 20' off the ground. I bought two of the Cabelas "basic ladder" stands, and I'm happy with them. They go up quickly, are very stable (and comfortable), and your choice of trees to use is much greater.

    I had used a Warren & Sweat climber for years, and I liked it... it's just that the best hunting spots never seemed to have a suitable tree in the right position (like downwind from a deer trail). There's a lot of conifer trees where I hunt. I can stick that 15' Cabelas ladder stand on a 30' tall balsam tree, and nestle right in the branches halfway up the tree, where there's plenty of natural cover. You can't do that with a hang-on or a climber.

    The only downside to the Cabelas ladder stands is they're heavier than most climbers. If you cannot use screw-in steps (they're illegal here too, except on private land), then you need a stick ladder for getting up onto a hang-on. With the combined weight of a hang-on and a stick ladder, it's about the same as the 40lb Cabelas ladder stand.
     
  9. noway

    noway

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    {They go up quickly, are very stable (and comfortable), and your choice of trees to use is much greater.}

    Can you tell me if the bottom footing provides good support in soft dirt ( mainly sand )? That's the only big concern that I have with the ladder stand since most of the weight is on the ladder.
     
  10. rfb45colt

    rfb45colt safe-cracker

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    Where I use them, the ground is usually quite soft, and very sandy. I weigh 240lbs, so it does sink into the ground some, most of the time. But it never goes beyond the bottom ladder rung.

    The weather here can vary greatly from the beginning of the hunting season to the end (Sept-Jan). If I put a stand up in Oct, and do not take it down until Dec, the odds are it would be frozen into the ground if I let it sink up to the bottom rung. So I carry along two 6"x6" pieces of 1/2" plywood that I put under the legs. I "salvage" wood scraps from dumpsters on construction sights. This stops the "sinking in", in even the loosest and sandiest of ground, except maybe a bog. The ladder stands come with little rubber "feet" pop-riveted on the bottom, so it does not "slide" on the plywood pieces. You can do like my buddy does also... he reomoves the rubber feet, and puts 2" long by 1/4-20 carriage bolts through the center of his plywood bases, and makes sure the bolt goes into the hollow legs of the stand. That absolutely will not allow the legs to slip off the plywood bases. I've never had the need, yet, to do that, but YMMV.

    I usually carry about 6-8 of those plywood scraps in my backpack. Another use they have is, if the ground where the bottom of your ladder is to be placed is uneven (sloped, not level), I can "build up" the lower side with the plywood pieces, to "level" the stand.