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I am reloading 9mm with SNS casting 125gr round nose bullets, using Federal cases. The Hornady manual C.O.L is two long in my opinion. I am using a Gemtech Glock 19 threaded barrel, and how I get my C.O.L is I keep dropping the C.O.L down shorter until it drops in the chamber and falls back put turning the barrel upside-down. These SNS casting bullets are .356 diameter. My C.O.L is 1.084, this is far from the Hornady manuals 1.150. Am I doing something wrong, or is this normal.
 

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You're okay. I had the same problem with Missouri bullet's cast bullets in the 9mm.

Load the longest COL that will fit into your chamber and gives you acceptable accuracy.
Ignore what it looks like.

If you load shorter than the manual states, you'll need to reduce your powder charge.
This is why a chronograph is mandatory for a reloader.
 

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I am reloading 9mm with SNS casting 125gr round nose bullets, using Federal cases. The Hornady manual C.O.L is two long in my opinion. I am using a Gemtech Glock 19 threaded barrel, and how I get my C.O.L is I keep dropping the C.O.L down shorter until it drops in the chamber and falls back put turning the barrel upside-down. These SNS casting bullets are .356 diameter. My C.O.L is 1.084, this is far from the Hornady manuals 1.150. Am I doing something wrong, or is this normal.
It is normal.

You have a few things going on. Federal cases use some of the thickest brass (smaller hole after sizing). You are using normal lead sized bullets (.356), so with the thick brass, after you return the case mouth back to straight with the taper crimp, some of the extra lead gets pushed back up above the case mouth, making for a tight fit in the throat.

Add to that a likely fairly tight and short throat with the aftermarket barrel, it forces a shorter OAL to get everything to fit. As Fred always says, OAL is gun and load dependent.

If you like the barrel, just make sure you use the start load in the load data and work up slowly. At that much difference in OAL from what the Hornaday guy used for that load spec, you likely won't be able to load to max without exceeding SAAMI max pressure.

Another option is use the OEM barrel, it will give you a little more room (likely longer and slightly more generous throat).
 

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This always gets reloaders panties in a wad. Just keep in mind this one thing; Oal is always gun & bullet specific, regardless of the data. Even if you are using the e act bullet, you are not loading for that test gun/platform. So fit the bullet to the gun, then develope the load. All bullets are slightly diff in nose profile, all bbls are cut slightly diff.
 

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Sometimes people get confused with COL (OAL) on a given load spec. The OAL published with load data is the minimum OAL for that load with that bullet. The reason it is minimum is because that was the depth the ballistician used when he set up the tests and did the powder charge workups.

What the "minimum OAL" means is if you want to run maximum charge weight listed, the publisher of the load data are saying it likely will keep you under the SAAMI max pressure.

If you take a published load and need to load the OAL shorter, then you know it will be wise to not load maximum charge listed as it likely will be over maximum pressure for the caliber.

Just like any load, you just need to start below maximum and work up.
 

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1.08" does seem a tad short for round nosed bullets, especially 125 gr...; most of my RNFP reloads were 1.12" or more....

I'd suspect the bullets might be a tad oversize and are catching on chamber ledge/transition to rifling?
 

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SAAMI spec for 9mm is 1.00 - 1.169"

Fred brings up a good point. While the above lists the SAAMI spec for 9mm, not all guns have chambers that are cut for that. CZ's are/or have been known for being short-throated. I know a lot of guys who shoot 1911's who will push the longer limit, especially when loading 165's.

The plunk test (and a chrono) is your friend.
 
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I prefer as long as I can load them becuase a number of my 9mm pistols prefer to feed longer rounds.

That said where I load them generally is dictated by how long I can get away with them in the firearm that likes them the shortest. You find that out in the "plunk" test you describe. With some bullet shapes that can even be too long for the shortest mag, so check that too before you crank out a bunch of them.
 

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It's all bullet shape and gun dependent. What feeds thru an STI may not work in a Glock. I've loaded between 1.060" and 1.175" OAL. More than 1.180" will not feed thru a Glock magazine. Now as you shorten the OAL, there is less case volume, meaning higher pressure, so you have to adjust for that.

 

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It's all bullet shape and gun dependent. What feeds thru an STI may not work in a Glock. I've loaded between 1.060" and 1.175" OAL. More than 1.180" will not feed thru a Glock magazine. Now as you shorten the OAL, there is less case volume, meaning higher pressure, so you have to adjust for that.

Sometimes. Oal is inportant, but charge wt & powder type will determine if shortening oal raises pressures to any noticable degree. I have flund the needle doesnt move much until you are deeper seating by 0.060" & that was with 124gr bullets & Wst or Unique at midrange levels. Slower powder or lighter loads, less pressure gain.
 

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Interesting thread. I was just loading 9mm for the first time today. With 124 FMJ round nose, I decided to go with 1.145" overall length.

The reason I picked that was by starting with a manual that had the same weight hollow points listed at 1.120". But I have factory Fed eral American Eagle 124gr FMJ rounds that are from 1.146" to 1.150".

Thus I first made 4 dummy rounds of the various lengths in that above range (no primer or powder), as I adjusted my Lee bullet seating die and crimp die. I changed the length each time as I compared to the factory round. I compared their overall lengths and their shoulders (of the bullet, where likely to engage the lands), until I settled on 1.145".

I used a Lyman gauge, too, to check fit and within specs, because I want this load to work several barrels.

Don't know if it matters, but I also settled on 3.9 grains of Win 231.

I then test fired with my Glock 17 at 50 feet, and they ran fine and were on target :)

I checked the empties after the test firing, comparing them to factory once shot empties. No differences or issues that I could see. So now I will load up a couple hundred of them and try them in various guns of mine :)
 

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Ithaca, you can NOT compare one factory loaded OAL to your handloads UNLESS, you are using the identical bullet. So load to the longest that fits your guns, no more diff than that. Forget the OAL in the manuals except as a guide. Even if using the exact bullet, their test platform is NOT your gun. A case gage is almost useless for checking OAL. There is not rifling in your case gage.
 

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Sometimes. Oal is inportant, but charge wt & powder type will determine if shortening oal raises pressures to any noticable degree. I have flund the needle doesnt move much until you are deeper seating by 0.060" & that was with 124gr bullets & Wst or Unique at midrange levels. Slower powder or lighter loads, less pressure gain.
OP is seating deeper by .066". I'd start worrying about pressure and use a chrono. Sort of flying blind without the chrono. I think 9x45 has a point here.
 

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OP is seating deeper by .066". I'd start worrying about pressure and use a chrono. Sort of flying blind without the chrono. I think 9x45 has a point here.
Again depends on powder type & charge. There are very few absolutes in reloading. Yes I find a chrono invaluable for such things. You can plot vel gain which is pressure gain, all other factors being equal.
 

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Ithaca, you can NOT compare one factory loaded OAL to your handloads UNLESS, you are using the identical bullet. So load to the longest that fits your guns, no more diff than that. Forget the OAL in the manuals except as a guide. Even if using the exact bullet, their test platform is NOT your gun. A case gage is almost useless for checking OAL. There is not rifling in your case gage.
I'm resisting the individual gun fit method. Factory ammo is not fitted to my gun. Fitting to a specific gun would be fine for that gun, but not the next. But out of curiosity, if fitting into a specific barrel chamber, what amount in inches do you back the bullet away from touching the barrel rifling?

My use of a manual for a starting point was just that, a starting point. But then I compared to the factory bullets. My reloads and the factory loads are both 124 FMJ, not exactly the same bullet but close. So, that served as the next point of reference.

I can plop the reloads in a bunch of my barrels, and I will do so for the heck of it, but I can't imagine (at my level of ignorance thus far) what that will tell me. The factory rounds work fine in all my guns. I made up a reload that is very similar to the factory load, just a little shorter OAL by .005". What will I possibly learn by placing the rounds into the barrels? They aren't going to touch the rifling, because the comparison factory loads don't. The base of the bullet is seated the same depth as the factory bullet (possibly .005" deeper than factory, or equal, depending upon variations in the factory loads). I'm at the low end of the powder grains according to the manual, so being the same as factory seating depth should be fine.

I'm just laying out my approach and reference points. Unless the reload sticks up out of the barrel chamber (it won't, but fine idea to check), I don't know what reference the barrel will give me.

The Lyman gauge is showing the round fits diameter-wise into the gauge, and shows it is headspacing properly. Also gauges the OAL, but you said that part is useless.

So right or wrong, I just don't see what is wrong with using a manual (2 different manuals), and factory round comparison (multiple rounds), and Lyman case gauge, all together, to come up with my first test reloads.

Dunno :)
 

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I'm resisting the individual gun fit method. Factory ammo is not fitted to my gun. Fitting to a specific gun would be fine for that gun, but not the next.
Sometimes Factory ammo doesn’t even fit quite right...
https://www.glocktalk.com/threads/glock-gen-5-short-throat.1682678/

Loading with some FMJ roundnose/Ball ammo is usually pretty darn forgiving in terms of being able to seat longer and still fit a lot of barrels. But if you want to reload the correct way, develop your cartridge overall length accordingly:

http://forums.brianenos.com/topic/200518-the-plunk-test-setting-your-oal/

Obviously you will need to work up loads over a chronograph if you’re trying to make a certain power factor or velocity. If you do not have a chronograph, I suggest staying in the shallow end of the kiddy pool (no higher than halfway between min/max charge).
 

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Sometimes Factory ammo doesn’t even fit quite right...
https://www.glocktalk.com/threads/glock-gen-5-short-throat.1682678/

Loading with some FMJ roundnose/Ball ammo is usually pretty darn forgiving in terms of being able to seat longer and still fit a lot of barrels. But if you want to reload the correct way, develop your cartridge overall length accordingly:

http://forums.brianenos.com/topic/200518-the-plunk-test-setting-your-oal/

Obviously you will need to work up loads over a chronograph if you’re trying to make a certain power factor or velocity. If you do not have a chronograph, I suggest staying in the shallow end of the kiddy pool (no higher than halfway between min/max charge).
Thanks, that was a good read: "Once you've found your longest possible OAL for your gun, then you shorten that by .05" and load up 10-20 rounds and try them - make sure they all will spin freely and drop out of the barrel easily. If you get any that are too long, try shortening the OAL a little bit more."

Seems as though that check is geared toward when having rounds too long, perhaps from trying to pack in more powder, or using long bullets.

I'm guessing my trying to just get a load similar to a common factory FMJ gives me plenty of room for OAL.

I just plunked my reload into my barrels, and they spin and drop out free :)
 

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I just plunked my reload into my barrels, and they spin and drop out free :)
This is pretty important as the 9 can be OAL sensitive in terms of pressure.

Example:

124gr TC @ 1.115 has a predicted pressure of 26,480psi
Same cartridge setback 15 thousandths is at 28,044

Not an issue in that example, but for someone running towards the top, jamming bullets, and doesn't have good neck tension...

For ****s & giggles, that same cartridge setback to 1.000 hits 47,589psi. Predicted of course :)
 
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