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Bug out idea/question

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I am not a prepper but since moving back to Long Island to take care of elderly family it has made me wonder about bugging out in a “bad” situation.

1. Assume health and finances are taking care of.
2. Living somewhere near large body of water (Long Island or South Florida)
3. Excluding a WW III scenario cause obviously there would be a whole other set of concerns.

Rather than bugout to a rural area or bug in somewhere in the suburbs what do you think about bugging out in a sailboat? From South Florida you could get to the Bahamas or most anywhere in the Caribbean to stock up on supplies or even Latin America. I know there are pirates etc but seems like this would give you some great advantages. You can carry fresh water and purify some as well. You could fish for food or simply go resupply somewhere in the Caribbean and buy yourself time and distance from the problem.

Just curious what you all think about the viability of such a plan.
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Discussion Starter · #41 ·
On a positive note, having a solid 4x4 vehicle, well supplied with extra tires( note plural) gas tank spares, etc is a good start.
Get off the island early, or get to Montauk.
Have food and water and weapons.
You may need to keep what you already have.
Or take what you need.
Gritty.
:)
Since I’m not a NY state resident just living here off and on taking care of aging relatives I can’t have any firearms. I pray everyday that should something happen I am not on long island when it does but back in my condo in south florida.

Florida has it’s own set of challenges but I can get to the gulf coast in an hour and a half to two hours drive from Miami across the alley or head north along I-95 or catch a boat or plane to pretty much anywhere between Fort lauderdale (mid size airport)/Miami Airport (huge airport)/ Palm Beach airport (small airport).

I am looking into buying a used (4-5 year old) Toyota 4Runner to give me more ground clearance and comfort since I drive back and forth between ny and fl a couple times a month now. I am 50+ years old and alone so whatever happens I either say a hail mary and hope for the best or try and get up to saratoga springs where I have some family. History has shown unless you leave a week early the interstate will be a bad choice in a storm.

While up here in the empire state I have been studying for my amateur radio technician class license.
 
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I think you have figured it out. The first rule of survival is to be in the right place at the right time.

Now, let's explore the three main factors.

You travel a great distance on regular basis. Assume that shtf happens to you when you are in the travel mode. Your inquiry has been about equipment. So, what equipment do you available to you while you travel? Are you prepared to go to ground for a few days in place? It is not an idle question. I drive less than 200 miles a month. However, if I am out and about in the car, I am prepared to go to ground. My car is never more than 100 yards away at any time. A boat is worth nothing to you and neither are relatives 200 miles away.

If you think that you will be near a marina when shtf, then focus on making friends with a boat owner, learn how to steal a boat if necessary, and think about what you want to take with you.
A low income earning USMC Force Recon Marine was asked by an overweight white male who had money (and an offroad vehicle) what he would do. The response, collect up the guns and wife and steal an suv from a fat old white guy!

Let's speak to skills. Have you been an Eagle Scout, been a grunt in combat or paid for skills sets like hunting/tracking/small engine repair/shooting/fishing/swimming/cpr/Heimlich?

If you don't have those skills, understand that having a radio transmitter isn't going to help you. I have done disaster communications service as a volunteer. No one is going to come help you when shtf. I know you don't believe this, so ask around what your community has put into storage to keep you alive. Or, like my spending time trying to get roadside assistance when my transmission blew at night near Baker, CA- my communications gear did not help. My suggestion to go check out the boy scout merit badge manuals from the library and give yourself the challenge of meeting the requirements for a couple dozen merit badges.

Let's now address physical/mental health. I am old enough to be your father. I am not on any medications. However, I have an hour walking in the pool every day for a torn rotator cuff (had both shoulders done years ago) plus another hour of exercise (every day). I know a guy my age - 71- who was a world class athlete and still competes in seniors decathlons! It doesn't matter than I walked through the Khyber Pass from Afghanistan to Pakistan exactly 40 years ago.

You need to accurately gauge your physical capabilities. Moreover, you need to keep your shots/medical examinations/dental work up to date. If you wear glasses, do you have an extra pair in the car?
 

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I am not a prepper but since moving back to Long Island to take care of elderly family it has made me wonder about bugging out in a “bad” situation.

1. Assume health and finances are taking care of.
2. Living somewhere near large body of water (Long Island or South Florida)
3. Excluding a WW III scenario cause obviously there would be a whole other set of concerns.

Rather than bugout to a rural area or bug in somewhere in the suburbs what do you think about bugging out in a sailboat? From South Florida you could get to the Bahamas or most anywhere in the Caribbean to stock up on supplies or even Latin America. I know there are pirates etc but seems like this would give you some great advantages. You can carry fresh water and purify some as well. You could fish for food or simply go resupply somewhere in the Caribbean and buy yourself time and distance from the problem.

Just curious what you all think about the viability of such a plan.
I've done some off-shore sailing GOM/Caribbean - 30'-40' boats. We caught more tuna and dolphin fish in a day than we could eat in a week. Faced some days with no wind so we had to motor, which of course takes diesel. We also had some V-drive problems and water pump belt problems. Pretty much have to run the motor some to keep the batteries charged, and you need propane and/or alcohol for the grill/stove. Keeping food fresh requires ice (which you can't make on a boat, or at least the sailboats I've sailed), or a refrigerator.

Then there's the weather. [Monohull] Sailboats don't move fast (even in heavy winds) they are pretty much going to sail at hull speed (or less) - usually 8'ish knots (max), so it is difficult to avoid a storm if one comes your way. I saw a 48 foot boat demasted when the chain plates pulled out of the hull in heavy weather, it was very fortunate than no one was killed - the only injury was a severely broken arm. It was a long ride back for him.

On another trip, we had a guy put his hand on the edge of an open locker. The wind blew the hatch closed - on his hand - breaking several of the carpal bones. We had to call a seaplane to fly him to Miami (we were in the Berry Is).

Long distance sailing isn't for the "faint of heart".
 

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Discussion Starter · #44 ·
I've done some off-shore sailing GOM/Caribbean - 30'-40' boats. We caught more tuna and dolphin fish in a day than we could eat in a week. Faced some days with no wind so we had to motor, which of course takes diesel. We also had some V-drive problems and water pump belt problems. Pretty much have to run the motor some to keep the batteries charged, and you need propane and/or alcohol for the grill/stove. Keeping food fresh requires ice (which you can't make on a boat, or at least the sailboats I've sailed), or a refrigerator.

Then there's the weather. [Monohull] Sailboats don't move fast (even in heavy winds) they are pretty much going to sail at hull speed (or less) - usually 8'ish knots (max), so it is difficult to avoid a storm if one comes your way. I saw a 48 foot boat demasted when the chain plates pulled out of the hull in heavy weather, it was very fortunate than no one was killed - the only injury was a severely broken arm. It was a long ride back for him.

On another trip, we had a guy put his hand on the edge of an open locker. The wind blew the hatch closed - on his hand - breaking several of the carpal bones. We had to call a seaplane to fly him to Miami (we were in the Berry Is).

Long distance sailing isn't for the "faint of heart".

I hear ya. Definitely more a rugged individualist persuit. You'll enjoy this then. While sailing across YouTube I came across a channel "sailinguma" a couple who met in college (graduated as architects) after running a successful home renovation business sold everything and bought a 39 ft monohaul. They have spent the last three years sailing the caribbean and latin america living on and maintaining, improving their boat. They make enough off of social media including patreon but the first year was tight money wise and they lived as lean as you can get. You would enjoy the channel I'm sure.

I guess I'm at that point in my life it's too late and too foolish to jump into this life now. I grew up in ft. lauderdale and long island. my dad had a 28ft cape dory and we sailed the hudson, long island sound, and the chesapeak.
 

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There are many many many islands in the Florida Keys and The Bahamas where fresh water, fish, conch, iguanas, lobster, birds, etc are plentiful. You’d need to avoid the locals but in the Out Islands that would not be a problem. Florida’s ten thousand island area has ole ty of room I which to get lost. Mosquitos and no see us would be an issue but the Seminoles managed to get around that issue in the BC ( Before Casino) days
 

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I am not a prepper but since moving back to Long Island to take care of elderly family it has made me wonder about bugging out in a “bad” situation.

1. Assume health and finances are taking care of.
2. Living somewhere near large body of water (Long Island or South Florida)
3. Excluding a WW III scenario cause obviously there would be a whole other set of concerns.

Rather than bugout to a rural area or bug in somewhere in the suburbs what do you think about bugging out in a sailboat? From South Florida you could get to the Bahamas or most anywhere in the Caribbean to stock up on supplies or even Latin America. I know there are pirates etc but seems like this would give you some great advantages. You can carry fresh water and purify some as well. You could fish for food or simply go resupply somewhere in the Caribbean and buy yourself time and distance from the problem.

Just curious what you all think about the viability of such a plan.
Sail boat adventures and frail elderly people don't mix very well but you do have the right ideal about boats.

I would suggest a house boat on a large lake that had plenty of fish. This gives you fish to catch, mobility and a place to live, no road blocks, traffic jams or people roaming around on foot looking for food.

Suggest doing this with other boat owners as there is security in numbers, a pontoon boat can be easily be fitted out as a small living area. You will need plenty of gas with hidden stashes on shore to keep from loading the boats down with fuel. Also bicycles and smaller motorcycles for mobility on land, these also could be hidden on shore or if room allows on the boats.

House boats have three big advantages, mobility, gets you away from the crowds and you are sitting on top of a food source. The ocean however is a dangerous place for more than one reason.
 

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OP, I like the idea of a sail boat but,
also have other options too, like a cheap
house in Florida and maybe Idaho.

Hope to one day get a sail boat and live
on it to see if we are up to it, have been
dreaming of it for 42 years.

We do live in Florida six months a year
and will be heading back there soon.

You may already know this, you can cross
Florida in a boat, if a storm is coming up one
coast, go to the other coast,

https://www.google.com/search?q=wat...1.69i57j0l5.7238j0j7&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8

''Can you cross Florida by boat?
The Okeechobee Waterway is a pleasant and unusual trip for boaters through the heart of Old Florida. ... It is the only navigable cross Florida canal. Landlubbers canalso enjoy the waterway at the various locks and parks along the route. It's fun to watch the boats pass through the locks along the route.
Okeechobee Waterway - Florida Backroads Travel
https://www.florida-backroads-travel.com/okeechobee-waterway.html''
==================================

https://www.google.com/search?q=flo...ome..69i57.31668j0j7&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8

https://www.google.com/search?q=how...ome..69i57.26904j0j7&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8

The main thing is,
be a good Boy Scout,
be prepared.
 
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