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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am not a prepper but since moving back to Long Island to take care of elderly family it has made me wonder about bugging out in a “bad” situation.

1. Assume health and finances are taking care of.
2. Living somewhere near large body of water (Long Island or South Florida)
3. Excluding a WW III scenario cause obviously there would be a whole other set of concerns.

Rather than bugout to a rural area or bug in somewhere in the suburbs what do you think about bugging out in a sailboat? From South Florida you could get to the Bahamas or most anywhere in the Caribbean to stock up on supplies or even Latin America. I know there are pirates etc but seems like this would give you some great advantages. You can carry fresh water and purify some as well. You could fish for food or simply go resupply somewhere in the Caribbean and buy yourself time and distance from the problem.

Just curious what you all think about the viability of such a plan.
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
let's see...
a) we have the most powerful military in the world, so we're not getting beat from the outside

b) more than 50% of American are decent, good people who believe in the principles our nation was founded on

c) Far less than 50% are lawless leftists who wish to destroy our country

I for one, prefer to stand and fight. I think the odds are with us.
I was thinking the last thing I want to do is exit Long Island in Car via NYC. Who knows whether the Ferries to Connecticut will be running and if they were I am sure it would be like trying to head north on I-95 in a Hurricane approaches South Florida. I still have my condo in Miami but selling it and moving onto a boat sounds good to me once I have done my part here in NY. I’ve never lived on a boat full time but my father had a sailboat 30 ft when I was a kid and so I have some experience.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Depends on the problem. Assuming for whatever reason, you cant stay in place, and the problem isn't weather related. A boat could be a viable plan.

Do you have a boat?
Do you know how to operate a boat?
Do you really know how to operate a boat?
Do you have several potential routes ftom your location to where you might store a boat?
Can you be locked out of that site?

If you at least have a boat large enough to be lived on for a bit, it could be a good backup.

If you dont have a boat, make plans for escape with a vehicle. Dont buy equipment that will only be used someday. Get things you'll actually use, and can always be useful.

If you're getting a boat anyway, may as well stock extra supplies.
Currently don’t have a boat. I grew up sailing on my Father’s 30ft. sailboat. So realistically I would need training and certification to do the sailing required to bug out into deep water or sail through the Caribbean. To be able to afford a boat large enough to realistically use as described I would have to sell my condo and live full time on the boat so if I were home I would be on the boat already.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
He lives in enemy territory- that’s the problem...

And on top of that (drawing on knowledge of the populace of DC suburbs) many may not be the enemy but they also don’t have weapons which becomes a problem.
Here on Long Island (LI) there are plenty of anti-gun people. Some of my family included. It wasn’t much of an issue when I moved up here since I have to establish residency of a year before I can have a gun here. Even then there is no chance of a carry permit whatsoever.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Training is a good plan.

If you want to live on a boat, go for it. I've heard it can be fun, though cramped.

Dont make the purchase of a boat solely for bugout purposes. It should be able to work for what you want, but there may be a detail thats missing somewhere. Go for some classes. Talk to people ( in person ) try it out.
At the very least, you'll have new skills.
Once my obligations up here are done I have a few friends with boats. One is an open fisherman with no cabin so that wouldn’t work. I do however know someone in the palm beaches with a fifty foot sailboat he races. After making this post I researched a forty foot sailboat which would be the minimum in my mind and used ones can be had for anywhere from 140,000 to 600,000 depending on type and setup. I haven’t been on much given how busy I have been here but this gives me something to research in the evening once things settle down.

Their are obviously many things to consider such as will I have access to my money in/outside the u.s.? If I open a foreign bank account and report it to the IRS would they seize foreign accounts belonging to Americans during a large scale national emergency? Leaving me without any money. What about getting health care outside u.s.? Cash and carry I imagine.

Like has been mentioned there are many variables.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
The flaw that I see (at least for the South Florida location), is that the most likely reason you would be "bugging out" would be a hurricane.
I definitely wouldn’t try that in a boat myself. I was thinking more economic issues (inflation/deflation) or some sort of very large civil disturbance larger than the immediate metropolitan area (south Florida). Maybe a terror attack dirty bomb and wanting to move far away 100 plus miles into the Bahamas/Caribbean
 

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Discussion Starter · #36 ·
Not a chance in Hail that I would move to a socialist paradise like where you live without kicking and screaming, literally. Never, let those sheetheads discover what happens the hard way when a disaster happens and the police are no where to be found.
They are old folks. Their kids, my cousins, are far away with young children. So I came back to take care of family. I’m glad that I can do it. It has been a mixed bag experience wise though. My permanent home is back in Miami. As of right now we (the family) have decided to help them stay in their home as long as possible.
 

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Discussion Starter · #37 ·
Do you currently sail or do you think you will just hop on a random sailboat and learn as you go?
No I don’t currently sail. I have been on power boats for fishing. I haven’t sailed since I was a kid. I have been researching getting ASA certified through a school in the caribbean. That will have wait until my obligations here in NY are done.
 

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Discussion Starter · #38 ·
Screw health care outside U.S. borders. You're taking major risks with non-U.S. drinking water, unsterilized needles, and sleeping on not-too-clean bed sheets. (Foreign bed bugs are like mini-Crocodiles).

And it absolutely will be 'cash-n-carry' in a real-world SHTF. Always is ...

So you need to adopt my Grandfather's 'Depression philosophy' toward money: 'screw the banks!'

If there's a panic run of customers trying to withdraw 'emergency' cash when the event hits, it's already too late. You'll never get your money out. The Feds will order the banks shut down and secured even if the resident manager didn't ordered it at the outset ...

Best to have a goodly amount of cash (maybe several thousand $$$ worth) in small bills stashed/hid where you can quickly and conveniently access it when the ballon pops - especially in a major financial center like NYC.

Remember, in a real-world SHTF event, the guy with a fist full of hundreds and a Glock 19 on his hip gets whatever he needs first.
I read both Costa Rica and Panama have good health care options. I learned Spanish as a kid in South Florida after we moved down from New York. I can read it and write it at informal level. My thoughts are not long term maybe if I have to leave for up to a year or two was more my line of thought. My kids are grown and spread throughout the country. Panama and Costa Rica take time but I read you can open an account legitimately as a non citizen. My concern would be given that I intend to follow the letter of the law and report it as required how quick will the U.S. seize it if SHTF.

I’ll say this at fifty years old I don’t know how many years I got left but I won’t be emigrating to a foreign country I don’t speak the language in to become a dishwasher or Gardner so I can live and eat. At that point given my age is life even worth living? I came across a very cool YouTube channel called sailing uma. Two kids met in college in Canada studying architecture and once they graduated took their life savings ($10,000) and bought old used sailboat and have been living lean sailing the caribbean for almost two years now. It shows the kind of things you may run into should you choose that route.
 

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Discussion Starter · #39 ·
I sail and have taught it for Red Cross and USCG.
Unless you have a boat over 65 feet with an auxiliary motor and loads of sea experience, that is not a way to go, sorry.
You should also have a small crew.
Lone sailors are easy pickings from nature and predators.
Ask the Coast Guard.
:)
For a crew it would be me and a friend who has boating experience. Possibly one extra person without boating experience. From Miami/Ft. Lauderdale the immediate plan would be to cross to Bimini first (around 60 Miles) then try and decide if we need to get further out say the French West Indies. I have friends in Martinique. I am looking at getting ASA certified to be able to charter so I can decide mono Hull or Cat. Right I am committed to NY for at least a year. So not much I can do now except research.
 

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Discussion Starter · #40 ·
No, stay in the US. If it's bad here, is it really gonna be better in those islands?
I don’t know. The Bahamas World Trade Center is still standing. They seemed to not have any DC sniper or Vegas shooter problems. One thing I have come to understand having lived among Latin Americans, Europeans, folks from the Caribbean is they aren’t the states but they don’t have some of our more common social problems. Again, I’m not planning on leaving forever just up to a year or two max god forbid the need arises. Anything more than that I prefer to let nature take it’s course. I have zero interest in living outside the u.s. and never coming back.
 

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Discussion Starter · #41 ·
On a positive note, having a solid 4x4 vehicle, well supplied with extra tires( note plural) gas tank spares, etc is a good start.
Get off the island early, or get to Montauk.
Have food and water and weapons.
You may need to keep what you already have.
Or take what you need.
Gritty.
:)
Since I’m not a NY state resident just living here off and on taking care of aging relatives I can’t have any firearms. I pray everyday that should something happen I am not on long island when it does but back in my condo in south florida.

Florida has it’s own set of challenges but I can get to the gulf coast in an hour and a half to two hours drive from Miami across the alley or head north along I-95 or catch a boat or plane to pretty much anywhere between Fort lauderdale (mid size airport)/Miami Airport (huge airport)/ Palm Beach airport (small airport).

I am looking into buying a used (4-5 year old) Toyota 4Runner to give me more ground clearance and comfort since I drive back and forth between ny and fl a couple times a month now. I am 50+ years old and alone so whatever happens I either say a hail mary and hope for the best or try and get up to saratoga springs where I have some family. History has shown unless you leave a week early the interstate will be a bad choice in a storm.

While up here in the empire state I have been studying for my amateur radio technician class license.
 
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Discussion Starter · #44 ·
I've done some off-shore sailing GOM/Caribbean - 30'-40' boats. We caught more tuna and dolphin fish in a day than we could eat in a week. Faced some days with no wind so we had to motor, which of course takes diesel. We also had some V-drive problems and water pump belt problems. Pretty much have to run the motor some to keep the batteries charged, and you need propane and/or alcohol for the grill/stove. Keeping food fresh requires ice (which you can't make on a boat, or at least the sailboats I've sailed), or a refrigerator.

Then there's the weather. [Monohull] Sailboats don't move fast (even in heavy winds) they are pretty much going to sail at hull speed (or less) - usually 8'ish knots (max), so it is difficult to avoid a storm if one comes your way. I saw a 48 foot boat demasted when the chain plates pulled out of the hull in heavy weather, it was very fortunate than no one was killed - the only injury was a severely broken arm. It was a long ride back for him.

On another trip, we had a guy put his hand on the edge of an open locker. The wind blew the hatch closed - on his hand - breaking several of the carpal bones. We had to call a seaplane to fly him to Miami (we were in the Berry Is).

Long distance sailing isn't for the "faint of heart".

I hear ya. Definitely more a rugged individualist persuit. You'll enjoy this then. While sailing across YouTube I came across a channel "sailinguma" a couple who met in college (graduated as architects) after running a successful home renovation business sold everything and bought a 39 ft monohaul. They have spent the last three years sailing the caribbean and latin america living on and maintaining, improving their boat. They make enough off of social media including patreon but the first year was tight money wise and they lived as lean as you can get. You would enjoy the channel I'm sure.

I guess I'm at that point in my life it's too late and too foolish to jump into this life now. I grew up in ft. lauderdale and long island. my dad had a 28ft cape dory and we sailed the hudson, long island sound, and the chesapeak.
 
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