Broke my spark plug

Discussion in 'Moto Club' started by Ralphumor, Jul 10, 2005.

  1. Ralphumor

    Ralphumor NRA Life Member

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    Any advise except "It sucks to be me?" Yesterday I was going to change the spark plugs in my 85 Goldwing. I have had it for little over a year and put about 10,000 miles on it without a hitch. July 1st it started running ruff so I figured replace the plugs and it should be fine. Well the fella who replaced them last (dont know when) must have used a air gun to put them in. I broke one off flush with the hole. I have NOTHING to grab on to remove it. I KNOW that not seeing this you can only offer your guess and yes I know it sucks to be me. Do you think I shall have to remove the head to get this puppy out? ANY help will be appreciated. So would spell check if I missed anything. THANKS!!!!
     
  2. Rosey

    Rosey

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    You should be able to get it out. I've used several different methods for similar situations. Just make sure to go slow and know your game plan before you start messing with it. The last thing you want to do is make it worse. But don't worry, you'll get it out.

    If there is any sort of ridge or uneven surface on the plug, try putting a screw driver on it. If you can get any traction it should come out easily. If it's broken off flush with the surface it tightens against, then the remaining plug piece shouldn't be tight. A few firm but CAREFULL taps on the end of the screwdriver might help the blade of the screwdriver grab onto something.

    -or-

    Unless you can somehow get a little cutting wheel in there to slot the [broken] spark plug (turning it into a screwdriver solution), you'll likely have to drill into it (not all the way through) and then use a extractor tool. Sometimes an extractor tool (usually a cone shaped, left-hand thread drill bit) isn't even necessary. Once you drill a little ways into the plug, reverse the drill and slowly try backing it out. A little sideways pressure can help the drill bit grab the walls of the hole you just made. But don't break the dill bit off flush--that'll make things harder. Alternatively, once the hole is drilled, sometimes the tapered head of a flat-head screwdriver, or a philips screwdriver slightly bigger than the hole can be gently snugged into or up-against the hole for traction. Then just unscrew.

    Drilling the hole an appropriate size and keeping it centered is the toughest part. Once you've got a hole drilled and a drill bit or screwdriver or whatever else you have laying around doesn't seem to be able to back it out--;m STOP and get a proper extraction tool before the hole gets all buggered up.

    Pics would help, if that's possible.

    Look HERE for more tips. I don't think you'll need to remove the cylinder head. Be patient, know what you're doing before you do it, and you'll get it out. :)