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Breathing / little help please

Discussion in 'GSSF' started by mike g35, Nov 10, 2011.

  1. mike g35

    mike g35

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    When I shot in Lexington I seemed to be holding my breath through each string. I know its because I was tense but I was wondering if anyone had any ideas on how to help with this issue. I was also gripping the gun way to hard, any help with that will be appreciated as well. :wavey:
     
  2. ede

    ede Bama's Friend

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    take a breath and don't hold the gun so hard, how's that? my dad told me he, and everyone else, trained to break the shot between heart beats so the beat didn't change their aim.
     

  3. BamaTrooper

    BamaTrooper Retired

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    Mike, what's your normal breathing pattern? Don't you have a no in/no out spot for 2-3 seconds? With a slow exhale, you should be good for 5-6 seconds.

    On grip, two things:
    1- remember that the off hand does the vast majority of the grip and hte main hand stays loose. Get your grip established before the "shooter ready?" and then don't crush your hands in a fit of buzzer induced panic.
    2- it may sound funny, but dry fire without a gun. Hold your shooting hand up and just move the trigger finger. Try not to let the other fingers move. Start with lightly closed fist and work your way up to open hand and moving only the trigger finger. I start with fingers straight and bend only the second knuckle to get the end 2/3 3rds of the finger perpendicular to the palm then do short trigger pulling motions. It's free, can be done anywhere and doesn't scare fellow motorist the way waving a gun around would do.
     
  4. mike g35

    mike g35

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    Thanks bama, the only other question I had was which hand does the majority of the power go to and you already answered it. I have been gripping my gun 80% strong and 20% weak (rough estimate). Now at least I have some idea of what I was doing wrong. As for breathing, I think the words "buzzer induced panic" described my issue best. Thats something I have to train more for to overcome.

    (I asked this same question on the GSSF FB page, you just cant beat GT's GSSF forum when it comes to getting reliable answers from experienced shooters.)
     
  5. Frank Bray

    Frank Bray

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    Hey Mike, I also had a problem holding my breath. Here's what i do. When the RO says "shooter ready" I inhale slowly the whole time (about 2-3 seconds) until i hear the buzzer. Then while i'm shooting I naturally exhale and dont even notice it.
    As far as grip goes I have a very hard grip i've notice with NON compensated guns the harder i grip the faster i can shoot. A hard firm grip reduces recoil/ muzzle flip and allows me to recover from the recoil faster and re-acquire sight picture. I can shoot plates in 2.0 seconds flat in practice when i'm focus with a hard grip.
     
  6. kyglockshooter

    kyglockshooter

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    Frank thank you for your post. I had a breathing issue that the RO saw down at Pensacola. He really helped in identifying the problem. I really like your tactic of inhaling from shooter ready, some RO's don't speak the shooter ready command so I'll have to pay attention to the RO process.
     
  7. mike g35

    mike g35

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    I like a firm grip, but the issue was I was squeezing so hard it was affecting my trigger pull. I was EXTREMLY tense though and this never happens at the range. I just have to get some more experience.
     
  8. mike g35

    mike g35

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    Thanks from me also Frank, I forgot to mention that before.:wavey:
     
  9. ede

    ede Bama's Friend

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    if a RO doesn't say or ask "shooter ready" and just beeps the timer i don't shoot and ask them if they ever heard or "shooter ready". it usually takes care of the problem. most of them don't know or are not all that experienced and they get nervous too.
     
  10. SARDG

    SARDG

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    I alluded to this on another GSSF thread, but competitors (for their own competitive good and safety) should know the general rules AND read the GSSF RO Guides:
    http://www.gssfonline.com/range-officer.cfm

    The idea of Shooter Ready? (or GSSF's Are you ready?), Standby, Buzz is to present a countdown cadence to the shooter and allow him or her to take that breath or whatever else they do within the last few seconds. The commands all need to be there, and need to be evenly spaced in time. (a cadence - the cadence itself is a countdown) ROs should all do things the same way so that the shooter has a standard to work from between strings and then stages and KNOWS what to expect.

    If an RO at any competition gets creative... just stop (as Ed said) and tell him or her what you expect. In a perfect world, you will know the rules and expect the RO to use the proper commands relative to the discipline - and all disciplines that I can think of have commands that build a cadence.

    To re-relate a story... In P'Cola I ran Pete Straub from Carver who came to the line and told me, "This is what I expect - Shooter Ready?, (head nod by Pete) Standby, Buzz." I told him he was in luck because that's exactly how I run people. (though one can't always count on a nod by the shooter)

    When I came to the line to shoot I had to request some adjustments to the ROs’ technique a couple of times.

    Chief ROs should also run shooters from the shooter's strong side - even more true with the potential for inexperienced shooters at GSSF matches. In P’Cola I actually only RO'ed for about 3 hours, but called "finger" about 5 or 6 times and "muzzle" about the same - repeatedly on some shooters. There is no clear way to see a finger on the trigger before the buzzer (our even while reloading) without the RO on the strong side and the RO needs a hand free near the shooter’s arm/gun to take control if the muzzle's dangerously awry. Many muzzle problems come when the shooter is clearing his or her gun and doesn't keep it pointed downrange. Other muzzle problems happen when a shooter loses focus and points well over a berm. I've seen some inexperienced females get hot brass down their bra and do creative things with the muzzle of a loaded gun. Not at GSSF, BUT, I have personally watched a shooter get a squib and then look down the barrel; I have witnessed a shooter turn around at the line 540 degrees with a loaded pistol; within 40 minutes of my first day as RO at our club’s public (open) range I was swept by a shooter’s muzzle. The very first shooter I ever ran as an IDPA SO, I DQ’ed for his finger firmly in front of the barrel when racking his pistol. (MD DQ'ed him, I called him) These things DO happen. The finger and muzzle issues can only be caught in a timely manner if the Chief RO's eyes are on the gun. The Scorekeeper RO should watch the targets.

    Okay… off soapbox. :courtsie:
     
    Last edited: Nov 10, 2011
  11. Melissa5

    Melissa5

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    Hot brass is a good teacher. I learned really fast to wear a cap and not to wear a v-neck or polo type shirt when shooting.
     
  12. rpgman

    rpgman SCGLOCK

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    yep, I know all to well bout HOT BRASS.
     
  13. Don At PC

    Don At PC Senior Member Millennium Member

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    I thought my oldest Grand Daughter had learned that too but at the Pensacola Match last weekend she got a quick refresher course. :faint::embarassed:

    Don
     
  14. rpgman

    rpgman SCGLOCK

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    ouch, hope she's ok.
    Greg
     
  15. Don At PC

    Don At PC Senior Member Millennium Member

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    She is fine. Thanks for asking. She was a little shocked and "Red Faced".

    Don
     
  16. mike g35

    mike g35

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    OK OK Greg, that requires a story, what happened?:supergrin:
     
  17. mike g35

    mike g35

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    Thanks to all of you for your help. I really appreciate it.
     
    Last edited: Nov 11, 2011
  18. BamaTrooper

    BamaTrooper Retired

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    Well, keeps us abreast.:whistling:
     
  19. Don At PC

    Don At PC Senior Member Millennium Member

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    You dirty old man. :wavey::faint:

    Don
     
  20. Frank Bray

    Frank Bray

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    Mike, match pressure is completely different from practice. Try to shoot in all kinds of matches to get used to match pressure. The adrenaline will always be there but with experience you'll be able to use it to your advantage. It creates a heightened awareness and faster reflexes. Also dont have any caffeine 24 hour before a match, natural adrenaline and caffeine will make you too tense and give you the shakes.