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"Breaking in"

Discussion in 'General Glocking' started by Ballisticism, Jun 16, 2012.

  1. Ballisticism

    Ballisticism Spray & Pray

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    I've read a number of threads where people say breaking in a new Glock isn't necessary - is this just for the purposes of reliability, or is it that there is not much change in the function of the gun after several hundred rounds?

    I've fired 836 rounds through my new 4Gen G23 and it's getting to the point now where I can see the wear marks clearly and the spring is not as stiff as it was when it was new. It seems like it is much nicer to shoot now than it was when I first got it, and I can't tell how much of that is my nervous system adapting to the pistol and how much of it is the pistol "breaking in"

    I clean it in painstaking detail after each firing session and lubricate every metal-metal contact point with CLP, let that sit 5 minutes, then lubricate it with Mobil 1 synthetic motor oil, since I believe the wear-protecting and sticking-to-the-metal properties of the motor oil are probably superior to the CLP, whereas the metal protective properties of the CLP probably win over the motor oil, so I think this protocol probably gives the best protection but I don't have any empirical evidence to support that claim.

    I just chambered a round after cleaning it and the slide closed with such a certain and satisfying CSHLANGK that I just had to post about it.
     
  2. txgunguy

    txgunguy

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    You're over thinking the lubrication.
     

  3. FLSlim

    FLSlim

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    The break-in period is breaking-in the shooter :cool:, not the gun. I'm sure the springs do loosen a little after several hundred rounds, but that isn't necessary for reliability. Most will tell you that Glocks are good to go right out of the box. Like TXGUNGUY, it sure sounds like you are overdoing the lube. Take a look at Hickok45's video on cleaning and lubing a Glock @ [ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DZf4mUM10Vc"]Glock Cleaning Basics - YouTube[/ame].
     
  4. Ballisticism

    Ballisticism Spray & Pray

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    Don't hate me because I came up with a genius idea.
     
  5. misfit356tsw

    misfit356tsw

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    There will be numerous people that disagree with me but for me a break in period is a requirement for any semi-auto handgun. Not only does it help with reliability but you also get to know your gun better as a side effect. My idea of a break in period is 500 rounds and you have exceeded that. Enjoy your pistol.:wavey:
     
  6. SARDG

    SARDG

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    Which idea - the one where you grossly over-lube a Glock, attracting dirt and grime, thereby reducing reliability?

    Hickok? RTFM first! The manual says 6 drops, the Armorer's Manual adds one more drop at the top of the barrel hood where it meets the slide.
     
  7. rilkil23

    rilkil23

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    I enjoy getting my guns dirty but don't enjoy the cleaning process. I clean everything after a day at the range but use as little oil on my Glock as possible.
     
  8. Bflying

    Bflying

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    Shoot it, clean it. Shoot it, clean it.

    All my Glocks function the same new out-o-the-box, as they have with 1k on them, and with 5k on them.

    Don't over think it, just learn it's personality and enjoy!
     
  9. Rustin

    Rustin

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    CSHLANGK is indeed a satisfying noise.
     
  10. DWARREN123

    DWARREN123 Grumpy Old Guy Silver Member

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    Yep over thinking the lube. I have run Glocks dry, wet and as per the manual and have seen no difference in operation or wear.
    Never had to break in a Glock (27,23,22,20,19) and have not seen any provable difference in operation from round one to thousands of rounds thru them. :supergrin:
     
  11. barth

    barth six barrels

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    My gen 3 G27 has been reliable right out of the box.
    I striped, cleaned and lubed NIB before I shot it the first time.
    But don't think I really even needed to do that.
    Seems like Glocks are military spec guns that really require little lubrication to operate.

    I think I've posted that my gun ran smoother after X rounds.
    But honestly I can't be sure that's really true.
    Maybe it was just me getting used to shooting the gun - LOL!
     
  12. SJ 40

    SJ 40 Deplorable,Clinger

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    I want to prove a new gun before I want to carry it, to me that's at least 250 rounds. SJ 40
     
  13. marson3erk

    marson3erk

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    i believe the "break in" is for the barrel more than anything. i like to slow fire for the first 500 rounds, that way i dont overheat it and improperly burnish it.
     
  14. Ballisticism

    Ballisticism Spray & Pray

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    Who said I over-lube?

    Well, I guess you did...

    To lube the rails, I dip a toothpick in the Mobil-1, put a drop at the muzzle end, drag the toothpick down the rail, repeat for the other side, then stand it muzzle-up while I clean the rest of the gun. Then wipe off the excess with a Q-tip.

    For the connector, I remove the old oil by spraying liberally with remington Dri-Lube (which works well as a highly volatile spray solvent and not much else) then apply a fine drop with a toothpick directly to the contact point.

    For everything else, I apply lubricant with a q-tip then remove excess by wiping ONCE with a dry q-tip before reassembling.

    <sarcasm> Yeah, I am totally over-lubing my Glock. I may just as well dip the whole thing in motor oil. The amount of lubrication I apply to the friction points of my weapon is grossly excessive and will cause it to fail within the next 5 rounds from the accumulated dust </sarcasm> At least I know it won't seize up.
     
  15. SARDG

    SARDG

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    Dunno... You said you "lubricate every metal-metal contact point with CLP, let that sit 5 minutes, then lubricate it with Mobil 1..."

    There are a lot of metal-metal contact points in a Glock that require no lube.
     
  16. Markasaurus

    Markasaurus

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    [ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D2LbUN2esXU"]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D2LbUN2esXU[/ame]

    I found this video particularly interesting, the basics of what to lube and not lube. Polymer-to-metal parts like the trigger itself, the slide stop etc. probably no need to lube them!
    I Lube the:
    -Barrel exterior (first two thirds)
    -locking lug female portion on the underside of the barrel
    -inside the slide, forward of ejection port, first inch - you will see the wear area.
    -both slide rails
    -trigger bar (it shows where in the glock manual, i know it says "OIL" but grease is better)
    -"cruciform" area on top of trigger bar (the cross shaped piece)

    In theory all moving metal parts benefit from a break-in period. Nobody can know when a gun is broken in without a microscope and a metallurgy degree. Keeping your gun lubed from the first shot is important, worrying about when it is broken in, is not important (unless you are shooting match rifle barrels etc. in which case the barrel not only cost you a fortune but probably came with instructions on break-in).

    I could be wrong but I'd suggest that in the first few hundred rounds, all that really needs to be done to break in almost any gun is keep the gun lubed up like you normally would, clean every few hundred rounds so as not to cause galling, and try not to overheat it by doing mag dumps?

    Everybody reading this already knows how to clean their glock and some are sure theirs is the only way. Detail stripping the lower is fun (to me) but the less you detail strip the lower the better off you are - it is steel pins going into polymer. Not only is detail stripping unnecessary most of the time there's a real chance you could enlarge the holes.

    Some people say they detail strip and clean their slide every time they clean the gun. There's nothing you can wear out by doing that, so if you want to why not? I would stop short of disassembling the firing pin for cleaning - what a PITA...hose it off with brake cleaner, scrub, hose off again, wipe, done. Just remember no lube in the firing pin channel ever.

    A can of brake cleaner and a toothbrush is all i need to clean the lower receiver and it takes me 5 minutes. I always replace the grease on THAT spot (trigger bar) you can simply pry the two parts apart just enough to get a drop of grease in there. Speaking of grease, i agree with this guy in the video. After 30 years of automotive I like to think i have learned a little bit about metal to metal wear and lubrication, the principles are similar for lubing a gun!
    In most climates, grease is just about perfect lube.
     
    Last edited: Jun 16, 2012
  17. MikeG36

    MikeG36

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    I’ve been using Mobil 1 for my 1911s for some time now and can report great results. In fact I wouldn’t be a bit surprised if some specialty lube companies simply rebottle Mobil 1 and slap their label on it. (I know of a centrifuge manufacturer who does just that with a huge mark up in price.)
    Having said that I’ve never used it on my Glock. Not yet anyways. I’m probably going to give it a try eventually. I’ve been using Ballistoll on my Glocks and like Hickock45 says “it’s as if it’s a seasoned frying pan”. Slick as Teflon. I love the stuff.
    +1 Yep. Just a few drops is all you need.
     
  18. John Biltz

    John Biltz

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    Even Glocks break in. Your trigger alone is going to get a lot better and springs are going to wear in. Glock said as much when they were having trouble with 115g 9mm. Their advice was to shoot 124g for the first 200 rounds. Why suggest that if there was no break in?
     
  19. GThirtyTwo

    GThirtyTwo Amor patriae

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    I don't think Glocks require a break in but they certainly shoot a lot better after several hundred rounds.
     
  20. H&K 4 LIFE

    H&K 4 LIFE Leonum A Ignis

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    Glocks do not require a break in period.

    What is required is that you thoroughly test the ammunition you choose to use for self-defense in your pistol. You do this to test for the reliability as well as the accuracy of a chosen round in your particular pistol.

    As far as lubrication goes-

    One drop of lube per frame rail, one drop between the barrel locking lugs and one drop on top of the barrel spread around with a finger. Like others, I also prefer to use grease on the connector, which means you need to lubricate the connector less often. Continually dropping oil on the connector every time you clean just leads to a gunky build-up forming over time.

    Glock pistols do not require heavy lubrication or special cleaning/lubrication methods in order to function properly. The tolerances between the slide and frame are purposely loose, and suffice to say that under most normal conditions, you could run the pistol bone dry and it wouldn't skip a beat.