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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
About the only things that cause me to make a trip to the grocery and risk catching the plague are lack of bread and milk.

I wonder if a bread-making machine is worth it. My stove is small, maybe too small to reliably bake bread. Dunno yet. Anyone got experience with electronic bread making machines? The kind that have programs for all sorts of breads.
 

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Extensive experience. I have three machines available to me which are used to make 4 small French baguettes each. The model is discontinued.
Do the following, in this order:
1. google "best bread making machines";
2. write down the names;
3. look up each model on Amazon.com and focus on the % of bad reviews. Eliminate the ones with the most negative reviews.
4. Now that you narrowed down the candidates, look at each one on youtube and try to avoid the b.s. ones where someone is simply opening a box.
5. if you have a favorite version of a loaf, then confirm that it can made with a model you have chosen.
Be aware that you need to use "bread machine yeast".
Be aware that there are bread flours, the best being King Arthur which is now nationally distributed.
The advantages that a machine has over the oven are: 1. the whole process is timed, including temperature and you will have consistency; 2. everything you need to clean is one spot.

If you want to learn how to make hardtack (which is not made in a bread machine), email me and I will give you a presentation I delivered in French. Ask for the English language translation.
 

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About the only things that cause me to make a trip to the grocery and risk catching the plague are lack of bread and milk.

I wonder if a bread-making machine is worth it...
Most consumer-sized machines make very small loaves compared to store-bought. In addition, the various mixes are, IMHO, expensive and not all that palatable (again, compared to store bought or even good made-from-scratch products).

With that said, most home-made breads (and similar baked goods) have a very short shelf life (gluten-free spoils even faster). Homemade (read preservative free) typically lasts about 3 days whereas most store-bought (read contains preservatives) last about a week before mold and bacteria begin to grow in numbers that could cause issues if consumed.
 

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When bread machines were all the rage I used to make a killer Onion Rye..
I have been thinking to bring the machine back home from my studio (Lots of storage there)
The bread never lasted more than 2 - 3 days....eaten up.
I found the hardest part was slicing it
Dump all the ingredients in the "bowl" according to the sequence, turn it on....a few hours later VOILE ...Bread... (Never mind the "hole" in the bottom from the blade)
 

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I used a bread machine constantly through the 90s and early 2000s. I never bothered with the mixes. The machine came with a basic recipe book that had a collection of recipes to be made from scratch. While it had quite a few options, I used it for white, wheat, honey wheat, and pizza dough. I never felt the need to move beyond those.

Mine ran fine on regular yeast. Maybe that varies with model and recipe.

In more recent years, i got into making my own bread by hand without the machine and haven't used it since. More recently still, my wife found a super simple recipe for whole wheat bread that she makes about once a week. It's good enough that we've been satisfied with that for the last couple years or more.

There are countless bread recipes and how-to videos on the internet. Find one that sounds good and try it out.

ETA: But, if the machine is what you want, I recommend one. They are convenient.
 

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If you want to try without a machine, try this recipe. I don't know whose recipe it is, but the bread is great:



The Easiest Bread You’ll Ever Make

Spray a large mixing bowl with no-stick spray.

Combine:

3.5 Cups All Purpose Flour*

3.5 Cups Whole Wheat Flour*

¾ cup wheat germ or flax seed

1 Tablespoon salt

1 ½ Tablespoon instant yeast

(Optional: Throw in a couple scoops of protein powder)

*to measure flour: Sift or loosen flour. Gently scoop or pour into measuring cup.


Slowly add in 3 ½ - 4 ½ Cups of lukewarm water. Use a wooden mixing spoon sprayed with no-stick spray to mix. Water should be mixed thoroughly, and dough should be sticky with little to no dry flour.

Cover the bowl with a towel, and let the dough rise at room temperature for 2 hours. The dough will rise substantially.

Cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate the dough for at least 2 hours, or for up to 6 days. (if you’re pressed for time, you can skip the initial room-temperature rise, and stick it right into the fridge.)

When ready to make some bread:

Grab the desired amount of dough you want and plop on a floured work surface (you’ll need to cover your hands and the surface in flour.). Round it into a ball or a log.

Place the dough on a piece of parchment dusted with flour. Sift a light coating of flour over the top to keep the dough moist as it rests before baking. Let the dough rise for about 45-60 minutes. It won’t appear to rise upwards that much; rather, it’ll seem to settle and expand.

Preheat your oven (and pizza stone, if you’re using one) to 450 degrees while the dough rests. Place a shallow pan on the lowest oven rack. Have 1 cup of hot water ready to go.

When you’re ready to bake, take a sharp knife and slash the bread 2 or 3 times, making a cut about ½ inch deep.

Place the bread, still on the parchment paper, onto the pizza stone or pan. Pour the hot water into the shallow pan on the lowest rack. It’ll bubble and steam. Close the oven door quickly. The steam settles on the bread’s crust, making it soft and flexible enough to rise as high as possible during those first few crucial minutes of baking.

Bake the bread for 30 minutes, until it’s a deep, golden brown. Remove it from the oven, and place it on a rack to cool.

Enjoy!
 

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Most consumer-sized machines make very small loaves compared to store-bought. In addition, the various mixes are, IMHO, expensive and not all that palatable (again, compared to store bought or even good made-from-scratch products).

With that said, most home-made breads (and similar baked goods) have a very short shelf life (gluten-free spoils even faster). Homemade (read preservative free) typically lasts about 3 days whereas most store-bought (read contains preservatives) last about a week before mold and bacteria begin to grow in numbers that could cause issues if consumed.
Toss it in the fridge, it will last longer.
 

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Did the bread making machine back in the 80's I think. It was lucky if the hot bread lasted the night. Then wife decided to diet so bread was banned, gave the machine to a friend who still uses it. The then wife lost about 25 pounds, I thought it was great that she would do that for me, but much to my chagrin she lost the weight for a friend of ours. Their marriage didn't last long either, I laughed about that. I started just buying frozen bread dough at the super market and baking it, worked just as good.
 
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Make a plain sourdough - no sugar or yeast. It will last much longer and - IMHO - will taste better as well; especially if you use the long ferment methods.

Sourdough has yeast in it, its just from your environment and not the store. It's also my favorite to bake.

Sourdoughbread.jpg
 

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most home-made breads (and similar baked goods) have a very short shelf life
Yes they do. Examples follow:
In Morocco, the school kids drop off mom's dough at the baker in the morning and pick up the loaves after school.

In France, it is not unknown to buy a fresh baguette twice a day.

When I make baguettes, they are good for about 6-8 hours. After that time, you wrap in a paper towel, stick in the microwave for about 10 seconds.

I know that a lot of people think that the life of bread can be extended by putting in the refrigerator. The girl friend puts store bought bread in there. However, I did research a few years ago, and the consensus is NO, it does not last longer.

If you are trying to lose weight, don't eat bread.
 

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Have had a Cuisinart Automatic Breadmaker for a few years; use it regularly. Cost about $100.
You can choose loaf size and crust (light, med, dark). Accompanying booklet has dozens of bread-type recipes; all easy to prepare.
Takes just a few minutes to put ingredients in, and push a few control buttons . . . then press the start button and walk away.The machine does all the work and beeps when your bread is done.
Works great and each loaf costs a fraction of store-bought bread; without any chemicals added!
Try it - you'll like it.
tbc.
 

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I thought it was great that she would do that for me, but much to my chagrin she lost the weight for a friend of ours. T
Thank you for my first laugh of the day. Always when you think the significant other is doing something for you, she is really doing it for herself. I have to keep relearning this lesson because I keep forgetting!:faint:
 

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I love my bread machine.
 
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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Thanks everyone for a lot of good ideas.

Shopping online, it looks like places tend to be sold-out of bread machines. Must be like toilet paper.

BTW, my kitchen is so small, kneading bread on a counter and washing all the utensils will be problematic. So, eventually I'll get a bread machine. For now I'll freeze store-bought loaves along with half gallons of milk.
 

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Grow you own with a sourdough starter.
Old girlfriend used to start with a few scraps of old bread to get the starter going. Then add flower & sugar every day until she had enough to do a loaf of bread. She never used yeast.
 
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The easiest bread recipe in the world.

Preheat oven to 350.

3 cups self rising flour

1/4 cup of sugar

1-12 ounce beer

Combine all ingredients together in mixing bowl. Place batter in a buttered bread pan and bake for 45 minutes. A toothpick in the center should come out clean when the bread is done. Remove bread from the pan immediately to cool. Butter the top lightly.

I like to add about 1/2 tbsp of basil to the bowl after palm grinding it. This gives it a nice flavor. But you can add anything: shredded cheddar cheese, a little pesto, whatever. Sometimes I use a good dark beer.

This makes a wonderful bread to serve with dinner.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 
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