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Brand new Glock shoots low and to the left. Me or the gun?

Discussion in 'General Glocking' started by Soilent, Jul 16, 2012.

  1. Soilent

    Soilent

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    Hey guys, I just got a chance to shoot my brand new G17 3rd gen the other day. Put about 200 rounds through it and I was just wondering if the way it's shooting is because of me (relatively novice shooter, but by no means a noob) or because this gun requires a few hundred rounds to break in? At about 7-10 yards it shoots 2-3 inchs low and 2-3 inches to the left.
     
  2. porschedog

    porschedog

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    It's you
    :)
    My buddy said his new g22 had the same issue, but it was him. He fixed it fairly quickly.
     

  3. oldguynewglock

    oldguynewglock

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    I was doing the same thing. Been shooting a year. Dry fireing pulling straight back and the trigger and more finger on the trigger did it for me.
     
  4. packeagle

    packeagle

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    I've had the same problem. Its getting better as I get used to the glock trigger pull. Shot a m&p and a s&w j frame and was shooting center groops.

    Sent from my DROID X2 using Tapatalk 2
     
  5. davsco

    davsco

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    troubleshoot the issue: let others shoot it and see where they hit. where do your other pistols hit. rest the gun on a sandbag and see what happens.

    generally (right handed shooter), low and left means you're yanking the trigger, but it always could be the sights are off.

    i was at a range and a guy was breaking in a new sig. couldn't get it to group worth a crap. asked me to give it a try and it shot very nice tight groups. knowing the gun could do it, he took his time, nice and gentle with the trigger, and started getting good groups.
     
  6. wespen125

    wespen125

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    I had the same problem. Bought a G17 a couple months ago and was shooting the thing low left. Bench rested it, and hey whata' know it wasn't the gun!! Shot dead center everytime I pulled the trigger. It's just taking me time to get used to the full size frame. I can drive tacks with my G26.
     
  7. Squeeze

    Squeeze

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    It is probably you. If you can find a rail mount laser sight
    to borrow, they make great training tools. Not an
    advocate for one on a PP pistol, but they are great
    training aids. If it is you, the little red or green dot will
    dance low and left on the trigger pull. My wife has one for
    her M&P 9c, and when she has been bad, and not
    practiced recently, I mount the laser, and show her pulling
    shots low and left with the laser. With a little bit of
    remedial training, she gets her shots back on target. Have
    a knowledgeable shooter check your grip, and what part of
    your finger you are using to press the trigger. Once that
    is correct, then work on the press, and trigger reset.

    Squeeze
     
  8. SGT278ACR

    SGT278ACR Retired Veteran

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    Same here with me. I have to work on my shooting to keep my rounds from hitting a little left with my G22... but with my G26... I'm a tack driver also. :supergrin:
     
    Last edited: Jul 17, 2012
  9. Arc Angel

    Arc Angel Deus Vult!

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    Because of the, 'modified Browning lockup' and the lack of a barrel bushing it's possible for a brand new Glock pistol to shoot either slightly left or slightly high. (This subject has been discussed many times, before now, on this board.) All this being said, it's more than likely that most of the problem is you - In fact, I'm sure of it!

    Think snap caps (A-Zoom) and lots of dry fire practice. If you watch your front sight very carefully while you're dry firing, you'll see what I mean. Give yourself time; eventually you'll get used to the Glock trigger and the problem will mitigate itself. :)
     
  10. PhotoFeller

    PhotoFeller

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    For the OP, I had the same problem and it was me.

    I like the idea of using a laser to help analyze trigger pull. Why didn't I think of that?
     
  11. Brucev

    Brucev

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    With extreme respect, it is you. Start at maybe 4 yds. Focus on the basic fundamentals of marksmanship. Use a 6 O'clock hold on a bullseye type target. Learn to shoot a consistent round group. Then move out to 7... then 10... then 15 yds., etc. Move out as you develop skill/consistency at each particular range.

    A very useful aid to learning to properly grip and shoot your G-17 is to practice dry-firing your pistol. Again, use good marksmanship technique and aim at a bullseye target using a 6 O'clock hold. Why? Simple. It is the easiest way to learn how to hold and fire correctly. A black front sight blade in the middle of a black target face is easily lost resulting in one's shots going into a less defined group.

    Do the dry-fire practice. Learn and focus on developing basic marksmanship skills. Learn how to properly shoot your G-17. If later there is still a need to adjust the sight, fine. Adjust it.
     
  12. JBS

    JBS

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    The advantage of dryfire practice is that it removes the element of recoil. In the beginning just focus on the front sight, no targets. Note that as the striker releases the muzzle will flip in a given direction. In your case to the left and down. Next exaggerate the problem in the other direction by getting as much of your finger on the trigger as you can. You will notice that now when the striker releases the muzzle will flip right. Adjust your finger purchase on the trigger until you find neutral ie. the muzzle flips neither right nor left when the striker releases. Normally correcting the right or left flip will also correct the down too with a Glock. When you have found the neutral location you are ready to start doing dryfire target drills. This is the method I use to train recruit Peace Officer that are new to Glocks. Hope this is of use. :wavey:
     
  13. PhotoFeller

    PhotoFeller

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    I like this advice, too. Sometimes recycling the old questions pulls up lots of useful info for folks who missed out the last time around.
     
  14. Arc Angel

    Arc Angel Deus Vult!

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    :upeyes: A little knowledge can be a dangerous thing! What's wrong with this advice is that it assumes a pistol's trigger is the key to straight shooting. (Looks like the author has spent too much time with pistol shooting, 'pie charts'.)

    :rofl:

    The, 'secrets' to shooting a pistol straight are (1) Properly gripping the pistol; (IT ALL STARTS WITH THE GRIP.) (2) squeezing the trigger correctly, and in order to produce as little sideways, 'trigger torque' as possible; and (3) carefully watching THE TOP of your front sight. If the grip is wrong, the shot is going to be wrong, too. It is, also, impossible to stroke (or press) a trigger correctly if the grip isn't properly set up in the first place.

    Saying, 'Pull the trigger correctly in either this way or that' only tells PART of how to properly handle a pistol. Trust me! Get the overall grip right to start with; and everything that follows will be so much easier to learn. The proper sequence is, grip, trigger, and front sight. Proper grip covers a lot of territory; you're going to have to google up this information for yourself. When you do, you'll learn about how to correctly hold a pistol, how to properly distribute pressure between your hands, how to best hold your elbows, (I've changed in the past two years; now I do it the same way as Middlebrooks.) and how to fire from your shoulders in such a way that your whole body becomes a triangulated rifle stock.

    As I said, 'pulling the trigger' is only one small part of the pistol shooting equation. Getting a lot of finger on the trigger is NOT a good way to handle a semi-automatic pistol. A double-action revolver? Yes, but not a semi-auto. (I call this the, 'Massad Ayoob syndrome'.) :supergrin:

    Look for Todd Jarrett or D.R. Middlebrooks videos on the Internet. I think these videos - when taken as a whole - with take you a long way towards your goal. By the way, in order to shoot a pistol straight you're going to need to know how to, 'shoot through' primer ignition, follow through, and regain (or reacquire) the trigger. The only way to do these things is with - not dry fire, but - live fire. Ultimately the only way to become good with a pistol is with live fire practice.