Glock Talk banner

Boots Stored In Trunk.

4106 Views 11 Replies 8 Participants Last post by  seamaster
Over the winter I kept boots in my trunk with other get home stuff. I am thinking of leaving them in the trunk since getting home in those rather than the shoes I wear in the office would be better, especially in adverse conditions. However, I am thinking the summer heat could ruin them. Legitimate concern or worrying over nothing?
1 - 12 of 12 Posts

· Registered
Joined
·
446 Posts
I keep my old hiking boots and a pair of under armor socks in my truck tool box for the last couple years. I've pulled them out a couple times to put boot dressing on the leather. So far, no problems. Like you, if I break down on the way to/from work, I have no intention of walking a few miles in office dress shoes.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
16,882 Posts
I have had a set of "get home" clothes in the back of my vehicle for emergencies ( a good soft pair of cargo pants, a long sleeve 1/4 zip shirt, fresh socks, underwear and a t shirt, a boonie hat, and a pair of broken in Danner hiking boots), all packed in a gym bag) for several years now; I'm in Florida, and the interior of the car gets VERY hot, all year; I have had no adverse effects to any of the gear .

I don't think you have anything to worry about.
 

· Senior Member
Joined
·
19 Posts
I did have a pair of LL Bean hiking boot with leather uppers with Vibram soles that were kept in my car here in Florida. Great boot but on a hiking trip in NC the soles separated from the upper on both boots. Not sure if heat related or not, just additional information.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
1,780 Posts
I wear clogs when possible down here in NE FL and really should put some better footgear and socks in my van for emergency use. I got a lot of stuff for that, but have nothing assembled and stored in my van.

I bought a nice pack on sale at Midway and after trying it on and adjusting it, I found that I wouldn't be able to reach my concealed carry... and the constant heat is a worry for a lot of stuff that I would like to pre-position. It's pretty hot in my garage, so I worry about anything for drinking or eating, too.

I got several kinds of Merino wool socks for this purpose, but I haven't figured which shoes to use for this purpose.

The only boots I have are my 1968 jungle boots or late '80's flight boots. I do have a "spare" pair of hiking high-topped shoes... made in China... that I don't think would suffice for much walking, so an old pair of walking shoes will have to do.

Wynn :)
 

· Registered
Joined
·
947 Posts
In extreme climates--very cold winter, very hot summers--you want to try to get in the habit of bringing your EDC (or emergency) bag into the house from your vehicle, leaving it by the door so you can easily grab it when you go out next time. Yep--it's a PITA, but once it's a habit, you and your gear and perishables are better off for it.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
16,882 Posts
I wear clogs when possible down here in NE FL and really should put some better footgear and socks in my van for emergency use. I got a lot of stuff for that, but have nothing assembled and stored in my van.

I bought a nice pack on sale at Midway and after trying it on and adjusting it, I found that I wouldn't be able to reach my concealed carry... and the constant heat is a worry for a lot of stuff that I would like to pre-position. It's pretty hot in my garage, so I worry about anything for drinking or eating, too.

I got several kinds of Merino wool socks for this purpose, but I haven't figured which shoes to use for this purpose.

The only boots I have are my 1968 jungle boots or late '80's flight boots. I do have a "spare" pair of hiking high-topped shoes... made in China... that I don't think would suffice for much walking, so an old pair of walking shoes will have to do.

Wynn :)
I wouldn't worry too seriously about the "excessive heat" , especially for items stored in a bag, in the vehicle; it may feel hot to you when you get in the car, but it's not going to be hot enough to really kill the things in your pack; some protein/carb rich packed food like granola bars, MRE snacks, etc, will last plenty long without going bad or melting, as will a case of bottled water.... rotate that stuff out every 6 months or so and you will be fine; we are talking maybe $10-$12 worth of stuff here, but it can make all the difference.

Also, try this experiment: take a thermometer (even a cheap one for the dollar store will work) and bury it in your pack that you keep in the van; then , check on it at various timee- when the van is parked in the garage, when you come back outside fro the grocery store and it's been sitting, etc;

I think you will be surprised how low the temp is compared to the temp in the area of, say, the dashboard....
 

· Registered
Joined
·
5,456 Posts
Over the winter I kept boots in my trunk with other get home stuff. I am thinking of leaving them in the trunk since getting home in those rather than the shoes I wear in the office would be better, especially in adverse conditions. However, I am thinking the summer heat could ruin them. Legitimate concern or worrying over nothing?
The glue used in boots and shoes has a heat rating so yes it's a concern. Also, storing boots in a sealed plastic will cause the rubber to fail. They need to breath. I used to store my expensive hunting boots in a plastic bag and the soles melted, not from heat but from off-gasing. Same happened with a different pair of boots in a different bag at a different time so I know it's something to do with off-gasing.

Anyway, get yourself a pair of desert boots. They are designed for high tempeture environment and use glue with a high heat rating. I keep a pair of Altama light weight desert boots in my trunk. They get used once in a while for hiking which is important because you don't want to be breaking in your boots when you need them most.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
1,642 Posts
The glue used in boots and shoes has a heat rating so yes it's a concern. Also, storing boots in a sealed plastic will cause the rubber to fail. They need to breath. I used to store my expensive hunting boots in a plastic bag and the soles melted, not from heat but from off-gasing. Same happened with a different pair of boots in a different bag at a different time so I know it's something to do with off-gasing.

Anyway, get yourself a pair of desert boots. They are designed for high tempeture environment and use glue with a high heat rating. I keep a pair of Altama light weight desert boots in my trunk. They get used once in a while for hiking which is important because you don't want to be breaking in your boots when you need them most.
I agree, I had a pair of Bates with the rubber sole that I kept in my toolbox. They were in there for a little over a year and when I did need them the rubber soles came off in chunks.

As for keeping bottled water in the trunk if it get too warm the water will taste like PET after a while. Rotate it often to keep this from happening.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
5,456 Posts
I agree, I had a pair of Bates with the rubber sole that I kept in my toolbox. They were in there for a little over a year and when I did need them the rubber soles came off in chunks.

As for keeping bottled water in the trunk if it get too warm the water will taste like PET after a while. Rotate it often to keep this from happening.
I keep a medium size cooler in my trunk. It's a stackable cooler that coincidentally holds a typical 2.5 gal water jug that you buy at the grocer. It takes up about 2/3 of the cooler leaving 1/3 for dry foods and other essentials. I'll try to find a link to it and post it. I place the jug in with the date up so I can check it but normally I rotate the water every few months anyway.

I've been carrying water and dry foods in my vehicle since being stuck on the free about 11 years ago. We were in a traffic jam that lasted about 4 hours due to an accident . The victims were air lifted but it took a long time to clear the wreckage and there was no way around it and no way to turn around and go back. A "perfect storm" as far as traffic jams are concerned. My wife was breast feeding our infant daughter so I gave here the little water we had. This was on the pacific coast with no fresh water. I also carry a full 2.5 gal metal NATO style gas can on road trips "just in case". Few years ago my fuel gauge failed and I ran out of gas. Fortunatley I had my boots so I walked to gas and self rescued. But I don't wish to repeat that so I now carry the small gas can. the metal can doesn't let any gas evaporate and there is no odor. It's a must have IMO, and booster cables!
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top