Books for beginning readers

Discussion in 'The Book Rack' started by bdcochran, Oct 14, 2018.

  1. bdcochran

    bdcochran

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    My nieces/nephews have 6 kids about reading age. Because I buy used books for myself from ebay/thriftbooks/amazon, I decided to look for beginning books. I was shocked at the low prices, delivered - like 45 books for $60, 20 Golden Books for $18. I was at a class yesterday at library and bought a pile for $1 each. I think I bought 175 books, including large books (still $1 each).
     
  2. KWalrad

    KWalrad No Wire Hangers!

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    Yard sales are another option for good finds. It does take patience though.
     

  3. DWARREN123

    DWARREN123 Grumpy Old Guy

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    Most people do not read books any more. You have E-Books and the internet plus TV.
    I think the written word is slowly disappearing.
     
  4. bdcochran

    bdcochran

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    Maybe.

    Some comments on literacy follow.

    I had thought that when the printing press came into existence that the literacy rate soared immediately. My research indicates that it remained low for generations. The number of books soared.

    The literacy rate for England didn't bump up until mandatory education came into existence around 1900.

    I have known native born Americans who could not read or write. The problem in Los Angeles persists culturally and I will explain. This is not only my observation, but also that of a phd. who taught/teaches in LAUSD Spanish. In east LA, the kids reach school speaking perfect Spanish. They cannot read. Mostly, mom is a stay at home mom and is illiterate. The local junior high school in my neighborhood (I repeat, junior high) has a 1/3 dropout rate because the kids just never learned to read and my neighborhood has a transient population. You don't need to be able to read and write in the culture because kids get jobs in the family business. Example - I have a American acquaintance of Mexican heritage in his 80s whose parents lived in LA and were quite wealthy. Personally, he owns a house in Santa Monica that is worth over $2 million. Of his own 5 kids, only one graduated high school. Why? They all worked in dad's business and education was not valued.
     
  5. teeuu

    teeuu Silver Member

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    One book I've never seen mentioned for beginning readers is The Old Man and the Sea by Hemingway. It's like he wrote it on a bar bet. The entire story is told with very short words, sentences, and paragraphs. It was assigned reading in a journalism class I took, to show how a magnificent story can be told even using the simplest language.
     
  6. bdcochran

    bdcochran

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    Correct.
     
  7. bdcochran

    bdcochran

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    I have a 14 year old nephew, raised by grandparents in another country for unfortunate reasons not related. Grandparents died. Well, he is back in the US. I know that English is not his first language. Sent some money for his "home coming". I also reflected on what books to buy for a 14 year old going through a change in language/culture/life. Sent him used 20,000 Leagues under the Sea, Three Musketeers (which I have in French), The Count of Monte Cristo (also which I have in French) in English.

    As he goes through this hard transition, I hope that the books help.
     
  8. Fatboy2001

    Fatboy2001

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    Old Man in the Sea is O.K. But when I was fourteen I liked Mickey Spillane, Ian Fleming, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle and of course, Playboy. :supergrin:

    One of my favorite H.S. teachers said, "I care more that you read and less about what you read."
    Good teech.
     
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  9. bdcochran

    bdcochran

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    Learned that the niece's daughter outside Boston is 7 years old. Sent three used Pipi Longstocking books. Scandinavian based. Was also a series of movies a number of years ago.
     
  10. Borg Warner

    Borg Warner

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    Those are all good books, and are ones that I read in the 6th and seventh grade along with White fang, Call of the wild, and The Jungle Book by Rudyard Kipling. I picked all those books out from the library based on the titles. No one told me that they were classic literature. While I was still in elementary school, my dad seeing how much I liked reading comic books (superman) bought me a beautiful hardbound illstrated copy of Gulliver's Travels which I would highly recommend.

    If your nephew is fluent in French, reading The Count of Monte Cristo in both english an French will help h9im with his English. otherwise he might have trouble reading in English at first and som simpler reading might be in order. James Patterson, the crime novel writer has a series of "Children's" books that are geard towards middle school students. The one that I'm most familiar with and would recommend is "The Dog Dairies".

    https://www.kirkusreviews.com/book-reviews/james-patterson/dog-diaries-patterson/
     
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