Bonhomme Richard

Discussion in 'The Okie Corral' started by thespork, Jul 12, 2020.

  1. tuica

    tuica

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    Yes. Sailors should have been aboard. Even in their status. Fire Watch? Suppression Systems? Will see what comes out.

    Navy firefighters are among the best. They have to be. You can’t call the fire department in the middle of the ocean. Or just let it burn. But we all know how bad things can quickly grow even worse.
     
    Last edited: Jul 13, 2020
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  2. sourdough44

    sourdough44

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    If in for refitting, seems welding causes a lot of fires. Not saying that happened here, at least taking an arsonist out of it.
     
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  3. Ftttu

    Ftttu

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    My helicopter pilot niece was assigned to that ship not too long ago. So glad this didn’t happen at sea AND with her on it. Prayers sent.
     
  4. SleeperSS

    SleeperSS

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    Probably to keep the hull from warping.
     
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  5. bfg1971

    bfg1971

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    Local news is saying fire may burn for days. Every ship in port has been asked to send fire teams to help.

    This is a very bad fire. They might have to scrap it rather than fix it.
     
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  6. Kentucky fan

    Kentucky fan

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    Unfortunately she will probably have to go to the scrap bin. It looks like the crew got out safe so I'd say command decided the crew was more important than the ship and got them out. This is one of the newer of the wasp class however their replacement class is in production so it isn't a huge loss.
     
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  7. czsmithGT

    czsmithGT

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    This thing will be scrap.

    The US Navy has screwed up more expensive ships since WWII than the Russians and Chinese could only dream about.

    Aside from this 1.2 Billion $$$ pissed away, look at the other ships put out of service because the crew couldn't keep them from running into other ships or running aground. Look at the engineering screw-ups and cost over runs for the Ford.

    Get the Hell rid of the Admirals who allow this **** to happen.
     
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  8. airmotive

    airmotive Tin Kicker

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    If she was at sea, this wouldn't have been a problem. Damage Control, fire fighting, ship's condition would have been entirely different. I spent a year on a carrier in the shipyard and the ship is utterly helpless. Hatches (doors) are blocked open with power cords and welding lines running through them. There's flammables EVERYWHERE. Most importantly, there's barely a skeleton crew aboard. There is no fire team.
    Six months later when we put to sea, that same helpless ship is now unsinkable. Every crewman has been through firefighting school. DC teams are stood up and the ship is ready to go to war. The Forestall fire was 100X worse, but she had a trained crew.

    Unfortunately, the BHR looks like a reef candidate.
     
  9. Grumpy_old_man

    Grumpy_old_man

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    Halide suppression system was down for maintenance.

    Ship was at the end of a refit, getting ready for F35's.

    Not making any claims, but it is an amazing coincidence that the PLAN recently lost their equivalent to the BHR in a dockyard fire under almost identical circumstances. https://www.forbes.com/sites/hisutt...e-aircraft-carrier-catches-fire/#4647c1e07f4d

    Grumpy
     
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  10. LEO/Dad

    LEO/Dad Navy Veteran

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    So, if they are in a three section watch, only 30 percent of the crew would be on board on Sunday.
     
  11. LEO/Dad

    LEO/Dad Navy Veteran

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    I
    I went through the Navy’s fire fighting school in SD. It is thorough. Classroom, then you go out and fight fires. Push flames down a passage way with 4 ft water fog applicator, 1-1/2” line. Two man team. They teach you how to do this.
     
  12. larry_minn

    larry_minn Silver Member Millennium Member

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    It sounds like 160 people on board when fire started? Normal crew is close to 1000? (Info I heard but I have zero knowledge of navy ship, crew size...)
    No idea if mostly crew, or construction folks. Word is every person is accounted for. No life threatening injuries. So that’s good.
     
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  13. tuica

    tuica

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    If the boat was in 7 section duty that pencils out to roughly 144 crew-members per day. Add others, civilian contractors (?) to bring the total to 160. But like someone here mentioned, a ship in the ‘yards is a different world. And different worker requirements, depending upon the repair/refurb cycle.

    In addition to Basic FF, I also attended one Aircraft/Ordnance FF School. Along with countless on-board training exercises. One shipboard fire in 2 1/2 years onboard. While in the ‘yards. Not really that bad. Except when you’re below a couple of decks. Which I was.
     
    Last edited: Jul 15, 2020
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  14. Simi_gun_guy

    Simi_gun_guy

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    I read elsewhere the halon(halide?) system was off line due to repairs that we’re ongoing. At my (former) place of employment the building sprinkler system had to be taken off-line to allow welding, soldering (torch) and other heat producing work to prevent a false sprinkler system release. I’d guess this was a similar situation. I also read the fire is STILL going as of ~6pm on Tuesday, more than 48 hrs in. Navy is still saying it is not a total loss. Hopefully they’re correct.

    Ed
     
  15. willie_pete

    willie_pete NRA Life Member

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    Well, certainly the tensile strength of any steel that saw 1000 F temperatures for even a short time has been compromised.

    I think the Navy is whistling past the graveyard.
     
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  16. airmotive

    airmotive Tin Kicker

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    I remember sliding around on the deck plates as the soles on my boots melted in the shipboard fire trainer. Out of curiosity, I cracked the seal on my OBA to see how hot the air actually was. If I had taken a breath, I would have seared my lungs and died. The training made me a believer in my gear, as rudimentary as it seamed at the time. “Balls deep in free radicals!” became the war cry of us Nukes in fire training. We were geeks...but we killed fires like cockroaches.
     
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  17. willie_pete

    willie_pete NRA Life Member

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    Likewise, I’ve done a fair bit of industrial fire training. Smoke house training is a real eye-opener.

    Go in a closed building in full gear and airpak. They start a fire in the corner and you watch the smoke bank down from the ceiling - a definite demarcation line between smoke and clean air.

    They have you take of a fire glove and SLOWLY raise your into the smoke layer. Can’t be done - too hot.

    DO NOT EVER jump out of bed and stand up if you hear your smoke alarm going off. Roll out of bed and stay on the floor until you can understand what is happening.

    Standing up with your head in a hot smoke bank and taking a breath can KILL you.
     
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  18. ddbtoth

    ddbtoth

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    The draw down during the Obama years really stripped out professionalism. Spend all your time on SJW causes don’t be surprised when other stupid stuff happens. Thanks Obama. Much like herpes, he’s just a never ending gift.
     
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  19. FireMedic-50

    FireMedic-50

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    The Carriers have a foam system on flight deck, overhead foam/sprinkler system on hanger deck.

    Thank God they were not underway.

    The USS Forrestal CV59 had one of the most deadly fires in '67 off coast of Vietnam. Afterwards was when the navy got serious about firefighting.

    Go to youtube and search 'Trial by Fire'. There are several versions. We were shown this over and over.


    BTW I was a carrier squid, Air Department, USS Saratoga
     
    Last edited: Jul 17, 2020
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  20. FireMedic-50

    FireMedic-50

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    Fire Watch consists of 2 people per welder, one with him the other on opposite side of bulkhead/wall.

    Damage Control parties are more common when ship is underway. Although a Fire control team and a Rescue and Assistance Detail are always on duty-respond when needed.

    If a fire breaks out while underway, depending on where fire is and size, the ship will call General Quarters. Battle stations.
    During GQ all hatches and doors are closed [to prevent spread] and cannot be opened without permission from the bridge or DC [damage control] central.

    Fires below decks in main machinery spaces, pump rooms and magazines are almost always automatic GQ.

    Not much scarier on a ship than a fire. There is only one other possibility.
     
    Last edited: Jul 16, 2020
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