Bolt action rifle: 1- or 2-piece scope mount?

Discussion in 'GSSF' started by Jim B in CO, Nov 4, 2010.

  1. Jim B in CO

    Jim B in CO

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    I'm thinking of buying a new scope mount for my Remington 700. Is a 1-piece mount (I'd probably buy the EGW) more stable than a 2-piece? Maybe the 1-piece is theoretically more stable but there's little, if any difference in actual use? :dunno: Does the 1-piece make it difficult to load rounds into the magazine (it's a short action .223).
     
  2. sourdough44

    sourdough44

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    I always go with the 2 piece bases. Some one piece bases have only 3 holes, & 'may' impede feeding rounds into the magazine. A simple setup that works for me are Warne bases & rings.
     

  3. Ol Timer

    Ol Timer ↓ hog hunter ↓ Millennium Member

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    Depending on the size of the scope's objective lens, a one peice base may limit the size of the ring height. I have a Remington Model Seven with a Leupold Ultralight 3-9x33 and must settle for using low rings instead of extra low rings because the mount is only available as one piece. The turret contacts the base while there is plenty of room between the barrel and objective lens. Lower is better, IMO and if two piece bases were available, I would use them for this setup. YMMV
     
  4. Clem Eastwood

    Clem Eastwood

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    i like 1 piece picatinny mounts.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Nov 4, 2010
  5. Esox357

    Esox357

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    a one piece is the better choice. Leupold makes a single base I believe for the 700. Less chance of having a base come loose. If not then go with the two piece.
     
  6. bigmahi22

    bigmahi22

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    1 piece base reduces stress on your scope just in case the receiver is not aligned within a few thousandth's of an inch. The stress "passed onto" the receiver instead. 1 piece base may interfere with proper ejection, especially in some Remington 700's if the extractor claw is causing brass to eject at an angle that is slightly more vertical than horizontal.

    On the other hand, placing a base on a out of spec receiver will, over time, bend the receiver. One way to check is to screw only one side of the base to the receiver and check the other end for any gaps. If there are gaps, then either or both may be out of spec.

    A 2 piece base may cause your scope to warp if your receiver is out of spec.

    IMO, the primary benefit of a 1 piece base is that it's much easier to swap scopes; you only have to remove the top of the rings without touching anything else.

    Second, if either your rifle or the base is out of spec, you'll be able to see it via the method I described above. You can then bed one end of the base onto the receiver (similar to bedding an action to a stock).

    Since your shooting .223 and don't plan on shooting 500+ yards, no need for a 15 or 20 MOA base just in case your wondering
     
  7. Zombie Steve

    Zombie Steve Decap Pin Killa

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    The 4 screws in the one piece somehow are going to hold better than the 4 screws in the 2-piece?

    :dunno:


    Anyone ever needed a little wiggle room when mounting a scope? Everything not drilled exactly right? I like the flexability of the two piece, and haven't run into a problem in a couple decades...
     
    Last edited: Nov 4, 2010
  8. bowtie454

    bowtie454

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    I've used both, and the one-piece was on a Remington 700. I prefer the two piece, as:
    1. The one piece only used 3 screws
    2. The one piece did make it difficult to load rounds into the magazine
    3. The two piece on my .300 magnum hasn't given me a single problem (never loosened, point of impact hasn't changed, etc.) in almost 18 years of use.

    If you are truly worried about a misaligned receiver damaging your scope, you can always check the alignment and lap the rings if needed. Plenty of info on the web about the "proper" way to mount a scope. As for a scope mount "warping the receiver", do you really believe that a scope mount held in by three tiny screws is going to warp a forged receiver (which is beefer than the base)? I don't.
     
  9. Jim B in CO

    Jim B in CO

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    -Judging by the picture on Midway, the EGW base uses four screws. Who knows what it's like when it shows up at my doorstep. :dunno:

    -I'm planning on lapping the rings (the first time I've ever done that).

    -I doubt an aluminum mount held in by small screws would warp a forged steel receiver.
     
  10. RonS

    RonS Millennium Member

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    I would go with a Burris posalign http://www.burrisoptics.com/sigrings.html system.

    It works like a Briley spherical bushing for a 1911, the rings are recessed and an alignment ring goes around the tube inside the ring allowing the scope to align itself as you tighten things down, avoiding bending the scope tube if something is off. (Think of a ball and socket, with the scope stuck through the middle.)

    IMHO few one piece bases are rigid enough to resist bending when tightened down on an reciever that is not true, leaving just about as much misalignment as a two piece set.

    Since 700 recievers are machined from tubing there is no reason to worry too much about the height of the mounting surfaces being off.

    I like two piece bases myself for looks and in some guns access to the ejection port. Or even better, machined recievers like on a Ruger or my CZ, then you only need the rings.
     
  11. Jim B in CO

    Jim B in CO

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    OK, I'm clueless. These is a Weaver-style mount, correct?:

    [​IMG]

    Can I mount Picatinny rings on this? I'm guessing not, since they're called two different names. The basic shape of the Weaver mount/Picatinny rings does look awfully similar...
     
  12. smokin762

    smokin762

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    I had a Remington 700 VS with a Leupold scope with a two piece mount. I liked it but I just had to try the one piece Picatinny optic mount. I thought it would look cooler.:upeyes:

    I found it to be a pain in the butt when loading it.

    I would recommend staying with a two piece optic mount. You will enjoy the roominess better. :cool:
     
  13. Jim B in CO

    Jim B in CO

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    But, but, but...I need to be tactical. :2gun: :supergrin:


    (Thanks, sounds like good advice you've given me. :thumbsup:)
     
  14. smokin762

    smokin762

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    :rofl:Your welcome!

    BTW, the slots are wider in a Picatinny Rail.

    A Picatinny Rail will accept Weaver Style Rings but a Weaver Style Rail will not accept Picatinny Rings.

    Most of the rings that I have seen are made as the Weaver Style, unless you are specifically looking for Picatinny Rings and they usually cost more.
     
  15. bowtie454

    bowtie454

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    Correct me if I am wrong, but don't most Picatinny rings have a bar machined into them that fits tightly into the slot, unlike Weaver rings that were originally designed to merely clamp onto the sides of the mount? Personally, I prefer the dovetail mounts for my bolt action rifles. I know, I know, I just don't look as cool. But I don't think they can be beat for ruggedness. JMHO.
     
  16. bowtie454

    bowtie454

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    The one piece I had (a Burris I believe) only used three screws. I guess it shouldn't suprise me that other manufacturers use four screws.
     
  17. Kentucky Shooter

    Kentucky Shooter NRA Life Member

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    I prefer two piece Leupold or Weaver bases, but no doubt the one-piece are fine too. I think my preference is based on cosmetic reasons as much as anything.
     
  18. Minnow

    Minnow

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    Leupold dual dovetail is a good two piece base.
     
  19. smokin762

    smokin762

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    Weaver Mounts will also have two bolts that are square that fit into the cross slots of the Rail. They are just narrower than the Picatinny ones.

    Both are made to make an optic removable and replacing it in the same cross slots so the zero will not be lost. Which is excellent when cleaning a firearm after a rainy day after hunting.

    A Picatinny Rail and Weaver Rail will be the most durable of them all. LOL! They not only look cool but they are very functional as well.

    With a Dovetail Rail, the optic stands a chance of being moved forward or backwards if it is accidentally dropped. Then it will need to be re zeroed. This will not happen on a Picatinny or Weaver Rail, the cross slots keep it in the same place until the user removes the optic.

    I know, then don't drop the firearm but sometimes crap happens.
     
  20. AK_Stick

    AK_Stick AAAMAD

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    Depends on the rifle.


    I have Redfield, Luepold, Tally, and Picatinny, mounts on my rifles.


    I honestly, couldn't tell a difference between them. I just go with what looks good on the rifle. They all do the same job.