Body Miller

Discussion in 'The Okie Corral' started by DScottHewitt, Feb 19, 2010.

  1. DScottHewitt

    DScottHewitt EMT-B

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    Is it wrong to not like the dude? I know the Olympic commentators keep saying the whole world loves him. But I don't. Not really. I just don't.
     
  2. TBO

    TBO Why so serious? CLM

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    I think he's a D-bag.

    ymmv
     

  3. DScottHewitt

    DScottHewitt EMT-B

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    I just have problems with the situation with his family member. And rumors I hear that he might have been in some of the altercations the family member had with the man he ended up killing.
     
  4. Trebuchet

    Trebuchet Sláinte !

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    Link to article

    WHISTLER, British Columbia -- If there was one thing we knew Bode Miller wasn't doing last summer as U.S. Ski Team hopefuls trained in preparation for the Vancouver Winter Olympics, it was train with them, if train at all. He was said to be debating what to do with the rest of his la vida loca, which had him go bust at the 2006 Turin Games and then walk away from the national team he was famous for being aloof with anyway.

    What difference did it make?

    On Monday, eight months or whatever after the U.S. team's summer training, Miller staked the best time of the first eight skiers on a steep slope of a Whistler mountain and dared 56 skiers who came after him in the downhill to better it.

    Two did by, you could say, the length of a ski. Miller took bronze for his old team.

    "It was fun," Miller said matter-of-factly later. "If I could do it again, I could hold those guys."

    We were reminded afterward that Miller is the most-decorated skier in U.S. history, or, in other words, our greatest.

    His performance at 32 after a self-imposed layoff underscored to me that he is something else, too -- the worst kind of athlete, absolutely confounding.

    Miller is one of those extraordinary athletes who has so much more talent than most anyone else but never mines it all for the worst of reasons, like discipline, a couldn't-care-less attitude or self-destruction. Every sport has had a Miller, or has one now. He is a Doc Gooden, or a Darryl Strawberry. He's an Alexei Yashin with ski poles instead of a hockey stick. He's a John Daly, but his problem isn't weight. He's a Jeff George.

    Consider this: Miller will race in four more events in these Olympics and, despite his age and layoff, will still be a threat to medal in all of them. Over his career he has scored points on the World Cup circuit in four of skiing's five disciplines. Miller isn't just talented; he is multi-talented. He's unlike most any other skier this country, or many others, have given forth.

    The U.S. Ski coach Sasha Rearick on Monday even said Miller was an innovator in his sport, which to me is a compliment that separates great from good. It's what separated Coltrane from every other saxophonist, or Fellini from every other filmmaker. It's special.

    "Bode over his career has been innovative and pushed the limits of his sport," said Rearick, who was instrumental last summer in talking Miller into skiing with the team again. "He's had some unbelievable races since he was 20, 21 years old. He's changed technique in the downhill. We should all be thankful we have an athlete like that."

    There is no question Miller has gotten a lot out of his talent since hitting the world ski stage at 19. He has 32 wins in World Cup competition, six World Cup discipline titles, two overall World Cup titles, and four World Championship gold medals.

    In some ways, Miller was fortunate to be able to contend Monday for an Olympic downhill medal. The event's defending champion, France's Antoine Deneriaz, retired after surprising the field at Turin, and the world champion, Canada's John Kucera, snapped his leg in two places in a wreck before these games commenced. The downhill field was winnowed.

    But Miller can just flip an internal switch, too. Despite not skiing much last year, he came into these games with some impressive recent runs. And when he came down the mountain late Monday morning, he did so with a seat-of-your-pants' fearlessness that has come to epitomize his skiing and elicit the oohs and ahhs from spectators that make him a skiing sensation.

    What Miller achieved Monday was, however, just his third medal won in four Olympics, which, no matter what some in the ski world may argue, is the brightest stage for the sport. He was favored to win several gold medals in 2006, when he entered five races. But he was disqualified in the combined event and didn't finish the Super G or, his specialty, the slalom. He was, however, reported to have finished off quite a few nights partying while living away from his teammates in a trailer at the bottom of a Turin hill.

    (Interestingly, Miller, a son of rural New Hampshire, was described by some at best as an iconoclast for his behavior, or at worst an enigma. His singular lifestyle away from his Olympic teammates was never cast like that of U.S. Olympic medal-winning speed skater Shani Davis, a son of a Chicago single mom, as un-American.)

    Miller tried Monday after his medal run to explain how he's changed his approach to these Games.

    "There's more environmental pressure," he said of the Olympic stage, whatever that means. "In the past, I've tried to suppress that. You have to feed off it, and hopefully that will elevate your performance."

    Veteran Miller observers noted that he has appeared happier and seemed more engaging at these games. He smiled as he stepped up on the bronze medal podium and gestured thankfully to an enthusiastic throng. He was relaxed but not ambivalent when he had the interview room all to himself while the gold and silver winners -- Switzerland's Didier Defago and Norway's Aksel Svindal, respectively – completed their required drug testing. Miller munched on some eats from a plastic bag and washed it down with swigs from a bottle of water.

    "One of the things that was important to me when I came to race this year was to race with inspiration," Miller said. "I didn't want to race like we raced at the world championships last year.

    "I felt like coming in here I wanted to let myself go," he said, "and get involved."

    It only took him 13 years into his sport at its highest level to decide to commit himself. One wonders how crowded his trophy case would be had he skied with this mindset forever.
     
  5. Gonetodarkside

    Gonetodarkside owl protector

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    I could care less about the dude either way. But I dont get totally distracted from reality based on what shows up on the little box anyway.
     
  6. Free Radical

    Free Radical Miembro Antiguo CLM

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    He's running out of time to convince me that he is as great as he thinks he is.
    He's had a good run. Time to say goodnight.
     
  7. Sgt. Schultz

    Sgt. Schultz Annoying Member

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    Biggest Olympic Disappointment Ever Miller
     
  8. okie

    okie GT Mayor

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    I ain't got a clue who Body Miller is:dunno::supergrin:
     
  9. KevR

    KevR

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    Who cares about the Olympics anyways?