black chrome, hard chrome or parkerize, etc.?

Discussion in 'Band of Glockers' started by bertud ng putik, Apr 6, 2005.

  1. bertud ng putik

    bertud ng putik

    Messages:
    381
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2005
    Location:
    cavite
    hello guys, tanong ko lang, whats the best for my norinco .45 acp interms of changing the paint? black chrome, hard chrome, parkerize, teflon coating or re blueing (matte finish), etc? and saan pede patira ang baril ko na cguradong maganda gumawa at di mapapalitan yung pwesa? im really worry kasi baka palitan yung mga vital parts eh. galing ako sa ali mall, sa reliable arms they offer black and hard chrome for P5,500 sa starfire pasig almost the same price din. saan pa kaya meron? basta pulido gawa at di mapalitan yung mga vital parts. hehehe! ayoko kay lantin at para kang nagpapintura ng kotse sa price niya. huh! tnx!
     
  2. batangueno

    batangueno Shock Resist

    Messages:
    4,807
    Likes Received:
    1
    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2002
    Location:
    California
    I saw a gun of a friend in PB that was finished with what they called black diamond yata. Ang ganda, black textured sya na hindi makintab. Try mo pumunta sa PB range sa del monte nandoon yung mga gunsmiths. You can also call them at 3734545 and ask about the rates for chroming.
     

  3. mikol

    mikol

    Messages:
    1,424
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Apr 15, 2004
    Location:
    currently in saudi arabia (jeddah)
    bro try mo sa shooters sa may cubao(or maybe they had transfered alsready near crame). ang pagka kaalam ko 4.5k hard chroming for the whole unit. pero kung slide or frame lang, mga 2k ata. maganda rin ang quality ng gawa nila dre.:) check out nalang their website for contact numbers.
    www.shootersarms.com.ph
     
  4. Valor1

    Valor1 Range Bum

    Messages:
    961
    Likes Received:
    54
    Joined:
    Jul 6, 2003
    Location:
    Urban areas
    Bluing:
    This is perhaps one of the oldest and classiest finish you can have on a handgun. It is very popular specially for “tactical” or “defensive” use. The word “blue” is sometimes a misnomer since the finish is really almost black in color and not blue. They are available in high polish and matte blue. Polished blue is very attractive but is not good for a working gun. It doesn’t resist rust very much and wears quite easily. If your gun is only for your collection and is to be framed on the wall embellished with gold, then this is the one to get. Matte blue may fare better with polished but is still not meant for corrosion protection.
    The advantage for blueing is its cheap price. In short, it is very cost effective. It is also very easy to apply. Anytime you want a reapplication, the turnover time is quick.

    Parkerizing:
    This is another traditional finish often used by the military. It is easy to apply, offers good corrosion resistance, is easy to reapply for maintenance, and is also relatively cheap.
    It’s primary disadvantages are that not all steels come out of the Parkerizing tank the same color, some cast and MIM components barely take Parkerizing at all, and stainless steel does not adhere to Parkerizing. Well executed Parkerizing looks very much like a matte bluing, and does not obscure fine metalwork. As such, it’s an excellent choice for a high end custom 1911 as well as a working grade gun. Newer Parkerizing comes in different shades of gray.

    Hard Chrome:
    This finish offers an attractive silver color typically in a brushed or matte (blasted) surface. Hard chrome was the original extreme environment finish. It offers abrasion resistance superior to most common finishes and excellent corrosion resistance. Matte chrome can rust since the matted surface can hold moisture more so than brushed and polished surfaces. The disadvantages of chrome are that it is fairly permanent, and very expensive and difficult to remove from the surface. A potential hazard of misapplied hard chrome is hydrogen embrittlement, where the parts can become brittle during the finishing process. This is far less common than seeing dented checkering, smeared markings, and blurred contours from haphazard surface preparation. Ask any gunsmith, they’ll all have tales of woe about a hard chrome job gone wrong. If any additional work is to be done to the gun after finishing, the chrome must first be stripped, then reapplied after completion of the work.

    Most finishes will stand up to years of abuse if well taken cared of. There is always a balancing act to be done on the gun as to whether you go for cosmetic or function. The gun and the finish will definitely face some wear with age and use. The finishing will definitely be repeated in the future. The key here is assessing the amount of abuse, environmental hazards and routine maintenance your gun will undergo in the future.

    Sorry ang haba.