Bicycles, anyone ride recreationally?

Discussion in 'The Okie Corral' started by BamaTrooper, Sep 19, 2020.

  1. Walk Soft

    Walk Soft

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    I have a 2019 Roam. I’ve put a couple hundred miles on it. No issues. I really like the riding position and the wider handle bars. I’m a Specialized fan too. Actually I’ve had two Trek’s. No real issues with any of them, but in the hybrid category I like the Roam for the riding position.
     
  2. BamaTrooper

    BamaTrooper Private side

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    Taught my soon to be 18 yoa nephew to ride, shoot, fish and soon, hunt.
     
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  3. FoatieFiveACP

    FoatieFiveACP

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    Yep. And as long as everything is working right, hydraulics are simpler to work on, since you don't have to screw around with a cable that wears out. Or frays when you are working on it and dealing with the end of the cable. It is a sealed system.

    However, with hydraulics, they at some point have to be bled. I have read about that sometimes being a major PITA on some brands of brakes, plus you have to identify and buy a specific type of fluid that your particular brakes requires. Some require regular DOT 5 (or 4) fluid, and some require plain mineral oil. I only buy used bikes (just like with guns), and my last 2 MTB's have had hydraulic disk brakes. Fortunately, I have not had to deal with bleeding brakes on either of them, even though they were / are pretty old. Just like with automobiles, I do not take them to mechanics, and always do 100% of the work on them myself.

    Having owned 2 bikes with hydraulic disks (as well as dropper seatposts with a handlebar remote, 1x front driveline, full suspension, and the list goes on...), I will never revert and go backwards in technology, or more primitive, on a mountain bike. I've gotten spoiled by those new features.
     
    Last edited: Sep 20, 2020
  4. CBennett

    CBennett

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    They are all decent.. Im more into mountain bikes now..I have a old Diamondback...old enough that its made in the USA..
     
  5. ithaca_deerslayer

    ithaca_deerslayer

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    What kind of riding will you and him do?

    Sounds like you are pretty sure you want some kind of flat bars. If true, then ignore the inevitable suggestions for drop bar models.

    However if not sure between flat bars and drop bars, then say so, and that opens up a whole nother rabbit hole of discussion. The more miles you go, and the more likely you are to be riding with others, then drop bar bikes make more sense.

    With flat bar hybrids, are you going to be mostly on pavement or off? The more off pavement, then the idea of a shock fork makes sense. Even if casual trails, if they are rooted, then a shock fork is worth considering. Not needed, but worth considering.

    Will you be doing hills? If so, are you a very strong skinny rider who doesn't need advice anyway? Otherwise, for normal person and doing hills, you will want the lowest gear ratio to be under 1. Such as .88 Even better is .83. All hills all the time, then even better if in the .7s. Why, because it makes it easier to climb. A lot of the Giant bikes have a low gear ratio of .83 or lower, and that is pretty good for going up hill, such as I'm talking 17% grade. Someone goes up steeper hills with a gear ratio 1 or above? Of course they do, and they don't need any bike suggestions from me :)

    How fast do you want to go? A lot of paved flats or long slight downhill, and if you want to go fast, then you'd likely want a high gear ratio of 3.4 or higher. Less than that and you will spin out (legs go round crazy fast, but no more gear left to make bike go faster). 4.18 is even better. If all speed all the time, then you'd want 4.5 or more.

    How to get both a low and high gear? Brings to the next question. How many front rings do you want? If only needing low gear, and all hill all the time, and no need for high speed, then a single might work (single ring in front, multiple cogs [gears] in back). That is one of the more mountain bike setups. But if you want a lot of low gear, and a lot of high gear, then maybe a triple ring. The down sides of a triple are more weight, more shifting (shifting rings is harder to do than shifting cogs), and more crosschaining (friction and wear from going from biggest ring to biggest cog, or smallest ring to smallest cog). There seems to be a trend nowadays to a double ring, to either find a happy low middle ground (30/46 teeth), or a happy high middle (ground 34/50 teeth), or any other combo, where you get more gearing range than a single, but less than a triple.

    It is important to know that each brand and model of bike has different versions. Picking the Giant Roam, for example, just really gets you a frame style. Within that, there may be 3 to 5 different versions. Those versions can differ in frame or fork material, and they differ in the "group set" and gearing ratios. You have to be very careful about picking the specific version of a model that has the group set and gearing that you want.

    All the major brands use group sets that they don't make. Shimano being one of the most commonly used. And, further more, Shimano (as does others) makes many different levels of group sets. You can by a Trek or Giant or Specialized bike and particular model from each, and they will likely all come with the same low-end group set (exact same shifters, derailer, rings, cogs, cranks all set up the same, work the same). Or spend more, within those models, and you can get a higher end group set.

    My main point here is that those models will, within the same model line, have variations of both group set quality and gearing range. I'm trying to get you to think about the gearing range that YOU want, and pick the specific version of a model that has that. Brand name matters the least. Frame design is important, but many brands offer very similar frame designs (so the specific brand does not really matter). But what does matter is getting the gearing that you want.

    You may not know what gearing you want. That is fair, but it will make a big difference in your ride.

    I have a Shimano GRX group set with 30/46 in the front and 11x36 in the back. Those are the numbers of teeth. Divide 30 by 36 and that gives the low gear ratio of .83, meaning 1 complete pedal revolution turns the rear wheel .83 times. Makes it easy to go up hill. For high gear, it is 46 divided by 11 = 4.18, where 1 pedal revolution turns the rear wheel 4.18 times. Those real things you can feel the difference in as you ride a bike. Being a double ring, there's not a lot of front shifting, I'm either on the 46 for fast, or on the 30 for slow and hills. Most of my shifting is between the 10 rear cogs (the cogs together are called a cassette).

    A great website for comparing bikes is https://99spokes.com/
    Click compare
    type in Giant Roam, for example, and you see various versions
    Select the Giant Roam 2 Disc 2020 and you'll see it comes with a Shimano Acera group set and 28/44 with 11x36, gives you a low gear of .78 and a high gear of 4.0. Check other versions of that bike and it will have different group sets and different gearing. But you'll likely find some other brand/model that is similar. Notice also the shock fork, aluminum frame, hydraulic disc brakes, and 700c x 42mm tires (wider than road bike tires, but thinner than some mountain bike tires).

    My wild guess, without yet knowing the type of riding you are going to do, is this bike has the features of your interest, in your price range. If so, then it is a question of trying to find your size in a bike shop within a thousand miles of you :)

    Here's the fun part, note I gave the example of the 2020. But if you look at the 2021 of that same model and version, it will have completely different gearing. So you gotta control for the year, brand, model, and version.

    Oh, if someone says to just change the gearing later... um no. Sure, it can be done (maybe, depending upon fit and other parts you have to replace), but it will cost you to make a change. Plus the parts are in short supply. Much easier to find the frame design/size and gearing that you want from the start. Another reason why brand doesn't matter much. Whether it is a Giant Roam or Trek Dual Sport isn't going to matter much as long as it is set up the way you like it, and available in the shop right now, when you walk in there with your wad of cash.
     
    Last edited: Sep 21, 2020
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  6. Detectorist

    Detectorist

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    Just get a standard MB with disc brakes. You will be able to ride anywhere.
     
  7. wally1

    wally1

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    Hard to find bikes now, but if you're handy, you can fix up whatever you find. Think garage sales.
    An old mountain bike with road tires, a comfortable seat, and upright handlebars can make a great "go anywhere" bike.
    I'm way past the "racer" set up and go for comfort these days.
    With ten bikes and two trikes, you might say I like bikes.
     
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  8. BamaTrooper

    BamaTrooper Private side

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    Mostly road use, no rough terrain. No long hills of note, but I had to teach my other nephew how to slalom UPhill on the steep ones. Of course we were both on single gear coaster/cruiser bikes at the time.
    Skinny rider? Nope, but the gear info was useful.
     
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  9. ithaca_deerslayer

    ithaca_deerslayer

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    Then it sounds like you can ditch the shock fork. They add weight, and you don't need them on paved roads (unless most your roads are washboard). It is ok to have a shock fork, but you don't need it.

    Without hills, then you don't have to worry how low the gearing goes.

    If you want speed, then for any bike you consider, ask how big the largest front ring is, and how small the littlest rear cog is. In teeth count. Do the math for the gear ratio and compare to my references above.

    You can also do even more math if you want. Measure outer diameter of rear tire. Typical hybrid with 700cx35mm tire is 27.5". A larger high volume knobby tire, 42mm wide, might be 28.5". Anyway, 3.14×27.5× your gear ratio = inches traveled per revolution. Times your rpm (maybe 90 on the high end). Times 60 minutes in an hour. Divided by 12. Divided by 5280. Equals miles per hour top speed :)
     
  10. jimcorbin

    jimcorbin

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    I have a Norco Rideau. I use it mostly on the street or paved bike trails. I rode it to work for a year or so but traffic got to crazy so I stopped.
    image.jpg
     
  11. Glock-O-Rican

    Glock-O-Rican

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    Well if your into bicycling U-tube is a great resource for fixing, and doing your own maintence.
     
  12. CC Glock

    CC Glock

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    Been racing and riding road for years. Me and the wife just picked up mountain biking since we live in the mtn bike mecca of the US. It's been fun so far. Downhills are where it's at! 20200921_134833.jpg
     
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  13. Tickhill

    Tickhill Eternity: Smoking or Non-Smoking

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    Bought a used Canondale off eBay, tires are flat but I have good intentions!
     
  14. Gonzoso

    Gonzoso

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    The devices we're all posting on were likely made by near slave labor under communist rule and the byproducts poisoning poor people in a country that has political re-education camps and harvests organs from prisoners on an as needed basis.

    Which is also where most of the bike frames come from...
     
  15. alank2

    alank2

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  16. Gonzoso

    Gonzoso

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    Bikes direct dot com if you're savvy, cheap, and can assemble and maintain a bike.

    Support your local bike shop if you're not broke like me.

    Anything over $500 probably won't suck. $300 on bikesdirect. Don't buy from walmart. If you don't know how learn how to change tires and tubes. I see grown men take bikes in for a flat tire to the bike store and it makes me sad.

    I've got a bikesdirect motobecane vent noir road bike with 10 years and lot of miles, a Trek Cobia 29'er, an old Marin Bobcat, a cannondale, and a Framed Minnesota 2.0 fat bike.
     
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  17. Gonzoso

    Gonzoso

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    Bikes direct bikes are great! I've built 3 and they were all good bikes, all still riding with no mechanical problems. The ex gf I built a bikesdirect mountain bike for almost ten years ago got fat and still posts pics of her riding it on facebook, so they can definitely take a beating.
     
  18. pag23

    pag23 NRA Life Member

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    I have a 24 yo Specialized mountain bike that is still going strong....works for me leisure riding...
     
  19. Trucker3573

    Trucker3573

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    Exactly. Where I draw a paycheck from is a huge leftist corporation. I definitely am not quitting.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  20. mhambi

    mhambi κολασμένος

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