bicycle riders, thoughts on hills, gears

Discussion in 'The Okie Corral' started by ithaca_deerslayer, Aug 10, 2020.

  1. unit1069

    unit1069

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    Thanks for the VA Creeper info, GT'ers. I will definitely visit if I get the chance.

    I was in and through Moab last September and was surprised there weren't as many bikers as I anticipated. I suspect it's really dead now.
     
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  2. wanderinwalker

    wanderinwalker 1911

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    Hahaha! I've hiked to the top of the Rockpile twice, ridden up the Auto Road when I was a kid (in an old Plymouth minivan!) but I've never ridden the Cog. It does look like fun though.

    Also, the Mt Washington Century bike ride doesn't go up Big George. Thankfully. That's the Race to the Clouds and I'm not THAT masochistic.

    Sent from my SM-A102U using Tapatalk
     
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  3. g30nut

    g30nut

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    I prefer to spin up climbs, I'm in middle georgia though so no real hills anywhere near me thank goodness. The worst I've seen here are 10% for very short kickers. I'm still fairly new to road cycling though so I haven't seen as much as others. I was just planning on doing some hill repeats the next month or so to work on leg strength. I have a campy set up 50/34 in the front and a 13/29 on the back. It came with a 12/25 but I wasn't strong enough to ride the hills. Since swapping the cassette, it opened things up quite a bit for me. Normal riding im typically around 80 to 90 rpms, up the hills are 60 to 70 depending on the grade.
     
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  4. drumgod

    drumgod

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    Ah, gotcha. That's you? The pic looked like you were hanging off the left side of the bike to intercept the pedal as it came up under forward motion. Makes sense that you were climbing on. Back in the day I maintained pennyfarthings for a group of shriners. When we ordered custom bikes, the wheel and cranks were sized to the riders inseam just like the frame on a regular bike. Your gear ratio was directly dependent on the size of your inseam. Same basic pedal mechanics as a modern safety bike, just direct drive. We used to ride them through town to get lunch and drum up some attention for the shop. I don't think I'd invest in one myself but they're certainly fun to ride now and then. :cheers:
     
  5. capnjim01

    capnjim01

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    Don't be mean. That is pretty funny,and true.
     
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  6. G26-Has-my-6

    G26-Has-my-6

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  7. capnjim01

    capnjim01

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    The more years the more gears.
     
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  8. Tuscany

    Tuscany

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    Yes, it is the easiest uphill gear for her and is seldom used. BUT, when needed for a short time uphill it is nice to have. They don't call it "granny gear" for nothing.

    The 52-39-30 triple road bike chainring set was likely the most common one back when you could actually get triple road sets. What gearing you put in the rear was up to you, but factory blocks often ended at 27 tooth. When her Lynskey went over 12,000 miles I had a new cassette put on and speced a 28-tooth instead of a 27-tooth, just to give her a slight bit lower gear. We're outdoor people who work at staying in shape, but we're not getting any younger so I'm willing to take advantage of some small nods to things that are a bit easier on our older bodies.

    Our 28 mile ride, which we call our "short ride" has one very nasty sharp uphill toward the end. The road climbs then dips down sharply and climbs again very sharp for over a hundred yards. Imagine riding from the lip of a deep mixing bowl down into the bottom then up the other steep side and you have Leonard's Hill. We often name our hills after the dogs that live or used to live close by. That particular hill is "Leonard's Hill" after a little dog who had a commercial doghouse built by well known local company of Leonard. Their name was in large letters over the door on the doghouse so the dog became Leonard and that is his hill.

    Again, our bikes are road bikes and I know almost nothing about mountain bikes. Thanks for your comment.
     
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