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At least 30 strains of the Coronavirus have been identified. That’s only what we know of... of the strains that exist right now.

CoVid-19 isn’t going to stop mutating for the next 18 months and beyond waiting on us to catch up.

“Scientists vastly underestimated” the likelihood of this virus to mutate.

We’ve never successfully developed a vaccine for a Coronavirus. Looks like that isn’t going to change now.

So... Coronavirus in its many variants is here to stay. Better start planning around that reality.


https://www.foxnews.com/science/coronavirus-mutated-at-least-30-different-strains-study-finds
 

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It's more complex than that. And vaccine is entirely possible.

While viruses mutate, antigenic shift/drift, not the entire virus changes. There are almost always conserved portions. The question is, will the conserved portion be able to serve as the right antigenic portion to elicit the correct antibody response in our body, and will that antibody be remembered long term.

Yes, human coronaviruses have been around causing the common cold for probably as long as human civilization. We haven't had to seriously think about developing a vaccine because we haven't had to.
 

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So no herd immunity either. This could kill a lot more people.
 
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So no herd immunity either. This could kill a lot more people.
You’ll get herd immunity, it just
may not be 100% effective. Eventually, humans will adapt to the virus. This will take time.

Years from now, this will likely be no more than a bad cold. In the meantime, we’ll have to deal with this.

This will not be the last zoonotic species jumper. There will be more. Watch China closely.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
You’ll get herd immunity, it just
may not be 100% effective. Eventually, humans will adapt to the virus. This will take time.

Years from now, this will likely be no more than a bad cold. In the meantime, we’ll have to deal with this.

This will not be the last zoonotic species jumper. There will be more. Watch China closely.
I’m going to watch China continue to ship us all their viruses unless we radically alter our approach to engaging with them.
 

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I posted this in another thread and am too lazy to rephrase it:

The statement that there has never been a vaccine developed for coronaviruses is not precisely true, or requires a good bit of qualification.

First, consider the nature of the SARS outbreak. It started sometime in November of 2002 and was over by late July 2003 less than 9 months later. It would have been very unrealistic to believe that a vaccine could be developed, complete animal and human clinical testing, and have been released for use within that time frame. During the self-limited SARS outbreak there were less than 8100 confirmed cases worldwide with some 774 reported deaths. There were 8 confirmed cases in the US with no reported deaths. So although the virus was very bad for those who caught it, its impact worldwide was trivial compared to covid-19 and its impact in the US virtually nil. There was nothing like the impetus to develop a vaccine for SARS as there is for covid-19.

Despite this, vaccines were in development for SARS and some were showing some promise but when the outbreak petered out the funding dried up.

MERS is a little different. It emerged in 2012 and has resulted in some 2494 confirmed cases with 858 deaths thus far. There have been only two reported cases in the US and no deaths. Few cases have been reported since 2016 but it remains a potential threat.

And there has been a vaccine developed for MERS. It has been shown to have good protective value in mice and has entered Phase 1 clinical trials in humans:

https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2019-07/wrai-mvi072319.php

If we had spent decades attempting to develop a SARS vaccine without success then it might be appropriate to adopt a gloomy outlook. There isn't great impetus to develop a vaccine for virus outbreaks that have been so self-limited as SARS or so well-contained as MERS. And when the outbreak peters out, so does the funding.

Considerable work has gone into the development of the SARS and MERS vaccines and will hopefully give us a head start in the development of a vaccine for covid-19.

New influenza strains emerge yearly. It has not prevented the development of influenza vaccines. The vaccines for the new strains are basically "built" on the vaccines for the old ones. Nearly all RNA viruses demonstrate antigenic drift. This phenomenon does create obstacles for vaccine development but they have not proved insurmountable. RNA viruses include influenza, poliomyelitis, rabies, rubella, measles, mumps, yellow fever, and dengue fever. Vaccines have successfully been developed for many of these.
 

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At least 30 strains of the Coronavirus have been identified. That’s only what we know of... of the strains that exist right now.

CoVid-19 isn’t going to stop mutating for the next 18 months and beyond waiting on us to catch up.

“Scientists vastly underestimated” the likelihood of this virus to mutate.

We’ve never successfully developed a vaccine for a Coronavirus. Looks like that isn’t going to change now.

So... Coronavirus in its many variants is here to stay. Better start planning around that reality.


https://www.foxnews.com/science/coronavirus-mutated-at-least-30-different-strains-study-finds
"There are four types of influenza viruses: A, B, C and D. . . . While there are potentially 198 different influenza A subtype combinations, only 131 subtypes have been detected in nature."

https://www.cdc.gov/flu/about/viruses/types.htm

I still get flu vaccine every year.
 

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At least 30 strains of the Coronavirus have been identified. That’s only what we know of... of the strains that exist right now.

CoVid-19 isn’t going to stop mutating for the next 18 months and beyond waiting on us to catch up.

“Scientists vastly underestimated” the likelihood of this virus to mutate.

We’ve never successfully developed a vaccine for a Coronavirus. Looks like that isn’t going to change now.

So... Coronavirus in its many variants is here to stay. Better start planning around that reality.


https://www.foxnews.com/science/coronavirus-mutated-at-least-30-different-strains-study-finds
My go-to for Medical Science fact is Fox News. (That was sarcasm)
 

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As noted above, the influenza virus mutates constantly. The virologist track down the new strains and add them to the flu virus as they develop. They'll have to do that with this also.
 

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Since I don't know anyone who has been sick, or know anyone who knows anyone who has been sick, I am willing to get back to normal life - maybe with occasional masks and no more tongue kissing strangers - and forget all this talk about immunity and vaccines.
 

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It's more complex than that. And vaccine is entirely possible.

While viruses mutate, antigenic shift/drift, not the entire virus changes. There are almost always conserved portions. The question is, will the conserved portion be able to serve as the right antigenic portion to elicit the correct antibody response in our body, and will that antibody be remembered long term.

Yes, human coronaviruses have been around causing the common cold for probably as long as human civilization. We haven't had to seriously think about developing a vaccine because we haven't had to.
Hey Doc...

do viruses blend? I mean, corona viruses are responsible for about 30% of what people are infected with when they have a "cold." So is it possible that someone has a "cold" due to a corona virus, then gets infected with covid-19, do the two viruses have the ability to form a new virus?
 
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