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Best way to download linux,......

Discussion in 'Tech Talk' started by Kanos, Feb 6, 2006.

  1. Kanos

    Kanos Why yes.

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    I was thinking about swithcing to Linux from windows 2000 and was wondering, whats is the easiest and most pain free way to do this?


    any help appreciated
    kanos
     
  2. hwyhobo

    hwyhobo

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    Not sure I understand exactly what you're looking for. There are many different distributions. Download one, burn the CDs, install, see how you like it. Alternatively, you can use of the "Live CD" distros, like Knoppix, but to me they do not give you a full experience.

    This is not going to be a quick fix. It takes some learning to start deriving full benefits from such a switch. You might want to ask yourself what exactly you expect to improve in your life by this. Are there specific tasks that are not served well by your present setup? How will Linux help?

    It is possible that right now you can't even answer those questions because you do not know Linux enough. That's why I would recommend you keep your present system and keep a parallel Linux system to learn it while you're being productive on what you already know.
     

  3. Kanos

    Kanos Why yes.

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    I started thinking about it, and relized my windows 2000 system works good. I never have viruses so why would i want to change?


    I guess i really dont want linux unless i had a spare comp(which i dont) lying around and wanted to see what it was like.
     
  4. Egyas

    Egyas Troll Hater

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    One of the best distros (Linux Distributions) for starters is Fedora Core. It is easy and fast to install (graphical installer), has an easy method of installing additional apps and packages (up2date and yum), and has a really good driver database. Getting it is simple. Go to http://fedora.redhat.com/ and download the CD image (Downloads link on the left), and read the install instructions.

    If you just want to "test" a linux install so you can look at it without rebuiling your PC, try one for the "Live CD" verisions. These boot from CD and give a fully functional Linux OS to play with. There are a couple of good ones, but the first one I think of is Knoppix.

    Hope you enjoy!
     
  5. greenlead

    greenlead

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    As far as the Live CD's go, I would recommend SLAX, it boots up to a full GUI with little mess.
     
  6. Washington D.C.

    Washington D.C.

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  7. Trsnrtr

    Trsnrtr

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    I moved to Linux last August after a bout with a slew of Windows virii.

    My permanent install is Suse 10.0 because it works well with my system, but I also have used or tried the following, some with more success than others.

    Ubunto - I've run it both live and installed and it worrked pretty well.

    Knoppix - This is my favorite live CD but version 4.0 doesn't detect my sound card for some reason.

    Slax - This one has a really difficult time with my system for some reason. It rarely completes a boot up.

    I've also installed Debian but I don't remember now why I formatted it.

    Personally, I really, really like Linux and it causes me no problems in a Windows world. My wife runs XP on another machine, so I always have a win machine if I need to run something that Linux can't, which is rare.

    I'm dl-ing Mepis as I write and I'll give it a whirl.
     
  8. Trsnrtr

    Trsnrtr

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    This is my new favorite live CD. It did detected everything properly and I can access all of my drives, including being able to copy files from my Win NTFS partition to a smart media card which I had to do on a roached Win machine one time.

    Looks good.
     
  9. nickg

    nickg

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    i put a 2 HDD on my comp and loaded Linspire on it a couple of months ago. i figured this would be a good chance to wean myself from Windows. i thought i'd be in heaven.

    over the last month i haven't even booted into Linspire. most of what i've been doing lately involves loading stuff onto my MP3 player and linux is pretty much a nowhere when it comes to doing what i have to do with my player.

    the only advantage that i've seen is better security logging on to the web. other than that i have yet to see a big advantage to using a linux based program.

    i am disappointed actually and figure that's money down the drain. the hieroglyphics of Debian based programs (or any Linux in my opinion) is enough to discourage the inquisitive. unless you want to spend hours swearing and cussing because you can't figure out how to do what you want to do.
     
  10. Egyas

    Egyas Troll Hater

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    Sorry you feel that way NickG. But I need to correct some misinformation. Linux is fully MP3 compatable. I rip MP3s from disks I own (legally), I have purchased from online sites, play MP3s into my player, etc, etc. Now, I DO NOT have an IPod, so I am unsure if these types of apps work or not. The trick is that because MP3 players/rippers CAN be used to violate copyright protection, they are often not bundled with the software delivered by the Linux Distro. For example, RedHat does not ship w/ MP3 support, but all you have to do is install it.

    I will agree with you that Debian is one of the more complicated distros out there. I have used Debian, but prefer Gentoo and Archlinux. For the novice, none of these would be considered "friendly" IMO. On the other hand, Fedora Core, Knoppix, Mepis, and perhaps Zandros are all quite easy to install and configure.
     
  11. nickg

    nickg

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    true that linux has it's share of MP3 programs no doubt. but my Toshiba MP3 player program is windows only based so linux doesn't work for that particular program application.

    as far as just "install it", with Linspire they want you to use their Click n Run (CNR) program to download programs out of the CNR "warehouse", which is pretty easy.

    but if you just want to download a program from another site i haven't had any luck doing so without trying to go into the "hieroglyphics" that i mentioned earlier.

    so actually any windows downloads are true "click n run" applications. no typing in or searching for commands to get it to work.

    CLICK - download, CLICK - open, CLICK - install, CLICK - it works.

    as i stated earlier though, you do get better web security with linux but as THE operating system i thought it would be i am disappointed.

    now i'm not saying i am going to dump linspire, as i will keep it there to experiment with. but it won't be my "go to" OS.
     
  12. redshift

    redshift

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    For linux first timers I'd highly recommend Ubuntu, http://www.ubuntu.com/ which is based off Debian. You get the great apt package system, plus probably the most complete linux-on-the-desktop out right now. I've switched us over to Ubuntu for all our workstations at work (I work in a network command center for an ISP) because it's relatively easy for linux neophytes to pick up, and still has the power and stability of a Debian system (still use Debian stable or Fedora on our production servers though!). Ubuntu also comes with a GUI front-end called Synaptic that you can search for, click on, and install programs without ever compiling a thing.

    Getting certain MP3 players to work under linux can be a bit of a pain in the ***; I don't have any experience with that particular model, but it took some minor hacking to get my iRiver to work properly under Ubuntu. http://www.linux-usb.org/devices.html might help you out to mount the mp3 player as a device. If you really want to get into it, you could always install Wine and run the Toshiba program itself under linux - it's not terribly complicated, and it works pretty well usually. Linux is a bit difficult to get used to, but once you do mucking about in the internals really becomes second nature, and gives you a great measure of control that you just really don't have in Windows.
     
  13. fastvfr

    fastvfr Ancient Tech

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    Exactly.

    And the reason for that is that Windows is Closed Source--we cannot get so much as a peek at the core code.

    Linux, OTOH, is Open Source and all parts of the kernel are open to modification.

    Once you get the hang of editing data and recompiling kernels, you'll be set. www.linuxquestions.org is a wonderful resource--but wait at least 24 hours before posting Q's--and make GOOD USE of the Search function beforehand to glean the most help from the 'graybeards' there.

    You can also install a second HDD and install multiple kernels of Linux onto it whilst leaving your Winders alone. I like to use GAG Bootloader to choose an OS.