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best way to clean a glock?

Discussion in 'General Glocking' started by modenar1, Oct 12, 2003.

  1. modenar1

    modenar1

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    i have glock 23, and i wanted to know the best possible way i can clean the gun. should i use break free CLP first, or gun solvent first. i dunno the process. and where it should be oiled or not. so if u experienced members can help me out. i will really appreciate it.
     
  2. GlocksterJeff

    GlocksterJeff Glock Armorer

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    Glockmeister.com offers some pretty detailed instructions: http://glockmeister.com/gclean.shtml. You can also do a search here on GT. There are a lot of opinions on the best cleaners and lubricants.
     

  3. CovertPenguins

    CovertPenguins Member Me

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    FWIW, I've owned a 23, then a 17, and now a 27 for the past 11 years. I've never had any problems with any of my Glocks. I've only used BreakFree CLP on them. I do a field strip and hose down the barrel with CLP then set it aside. I use Q-Tips lightly coated with CLP to clean the obvious buildup areas of the slide. Gently, I scrub out all exposed areas, being careful to avoid allowing CLP to get into the cracks in the rear area of the slide. The slide rails get a few Q-Tips for each side. The receiver is cleaned the same way with only the metal pieces getting a CLP'd Q-Tip, unless there is obvious powder or other buildup. Once the slide and receiver are clean, I go to town on the barrel. The stock bore brush is hosed down with CLP and run through the barrel until I'm satisified it's clean. Then I run clean patches through the barrel until they come out clean (new patch each time). With a clean hand towel, I throughly dry the receiver and slide, then the barrel. Now for the assembly and lube points. Place the slide upside down (sights towards the table) and apply ONE drop of CLP on the underside of the slide where the barrel causes wear marks. Now apply ONE drop of CLP to the barrel and, using your finger, spread the CLP around the entire rounded portion of the barrel. Insert the barrel into the slide and affix the spring in position. Directly behind the spring (to the rear) is a small cavity, this gets ONE drop. Now dip a Q-Tip in CLP and run it along both slide rails. Now put ONE drop on your last Q-Tip and gently rub the trigger connector in the hole at the rear-right side of the slide. Careful not to get too much CLP in this last one. Slide the receiver into position on the slide until it locks into place. Pick up your clean gun and give the assembled gun a good inspection. Use a lightly CLP'd patch to scrub off any obvious residue, and follow with the dry towel. Glocks don't need much lube. There are lots of pictures on the web, but your manual has the best one for lube points. As for cleaner/degreaser choices, I'd stick with just CLP. When I was in the Coast Guard that's all we used to clean and lube our Beretta 92F's and those guns need a lot of maintenance to perform in that harsh environment. The guns always functioned well. I'm sold on CLP, and it's never done my Glocks wrong.
     
  4. gudel

    gudel

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    bucket of water with degreaser or dishwashing soap.
    detail strip, soak parts and brush. take them out of the bucket, dry it. coat all metal parts with hoppes 9. reassemble. done. for bore, i use shooter's choice. squeaky clean.

    not once my G17 ever fail on me. ;f
     
  5. MStarmer

    MStarmer In Jail...

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    You can be as anal as you want or keep it as simple as you want. Any good CLP will serve all your functions fine and keep your purchases to a minimum. If I'm at a class and or traveling I just pack a small bottle of CLP (FP-10 is my choice) and one of those Kleen-Bore cleaning kits that fit's into it's own handle. Add a few q-tips and patches and you're good to go.

    Personally I have several solvents/cleaners/lubes and each have a special place.

    Sweets 7.62 for that stubborn fouling.
    JB Bore paste for the stuff that even the sweets doesn't get out.
    Shooters choice bore cleaner.
    Shooters Choice FP-10.
    BreakFree CLP.
    Boeshield.
    Brian Enos Slide Glide.
    MPRO-7

    Mostly I have collected them just to see if one works any better than the other, but to be honest I can't really tell any difference except in smell..

    The JB bore paste does an excellent job though of getting any crud that just doesn't want to come out though..

    As far a lubing goes a little goes a long way. Just a drop on the slide rails and barrel and your gun is ready to go. I personally also just put a slight coating of the slide-glide (grease) on the frame rails and connector.
     
  6. myounger

    myounger HrdHatDivr

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    Like Gudel, strip it down to each part. A hot pan of water and detergent. I prefer Simple Green, use it to clean any gun part, it does cut the crud and oil off quite well. Scrub with an old tooth brush and rinse in hot tap water and DRY the parts. If you have an air line with a blowgun, thats even better to get rid of the water. Light coat of oil and wipe the oil off with a clean rag. You dont need a lot of oil on a Glock. Put it all back together and your good to go!
    You might want to look at some of the other posts on this site for detail strip instructions and lube information.
     
  7. cmbutler

    cmbutler

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    I use the Simple Green method as well. Do a field strip and soak receiver, slide, and recoil spring/rod in Simple Green/water mixture. While this is soaking, I scrub the barrel with solvent (I use hoppes). I prefer brass brushes to the stock one. Once barrel is clean, I let it sit in the Simple Green. I then scrub the other part with a tooth brush, rinse with water and blow out with compressed air. Then do the same to the outside of the barrel. I lube the slide rails and wipe down the barrel and slide with a light coat of Tetra grease and put a drop of oil on the trigger bar/connector.

    This has worked well for me. I did a detail strip at 2500 rounds and everything looked spotless. Of course I am pretty anal about keeping my guns clean.
     
  8. ryucasta

    ryucasta IDPA/IPSC Cuban

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    After shooting jacketed or plated bullets I use WD-40, with a clean rag, an old tooth brush and a bore snake. If shooting lead (Moly) I use a lead remover and then the aforementioned products. Just remember to keep your striker channel clean and dry.
     
  9. busher15

    busher15

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    if it gets dirty, use a puddle
    if it needs lubed, use a mud puddle
     
  10. freepatriot

    freepatriot Retired GT Mod Moderator

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    I'm sorry, I don't understand...


    ...


    Clean it?
     
  11. ngoehle

    ngoehle Life Member

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    I can't believe this thread has had this many responses without the traditional 'tupperware' instruction.

    Dishwasher safe, top rack only, and wait until the wife leaves the house for the ENTIRE cycle.

    ;Q