Best time to buy car...

Discussion in 'The Okie Corral' started by meathead19, Nov 15, 2010.

  1. meathead19

    meathead19

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    is now till end of year?

    This is what I've been told by co worker......agree/disagree?

    My 2003 Jeep GC has 115K miles and now the rear seal is leaking, so are repairs going to become a monthly burden or do I trade in and get a new, disguisting, payment book?

    I can handle occasional repairs, but I got a feeling this is just the beginning of rebuilding the Jeep.

    Anyone have personal experience with these Jeeps....owners, mechanics, etc.?
     
  2. robinsok

    robinsok

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    Does it have the inline 4.0? If so, they run a long time, 115K is not that high of a number for that engine. I don't know about jeeps other motors. My cherokee with the I-6 I sold with 215K on it. Probably cheaper to keep what you have if its paid off, even doing repairs here and there, it will cost less than a new car.
     

  3. RonS

    RonS Millennium Member

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    Most GC were 360 V8s.

    Only you can decide, but IMHO most Jeep core components will last a long time and most of the problems will be that piddly stuff will go wrong with sensors, switches and the AC components. Just lost the crank sensor on my 4.0 last weekend for example.

    I wouldn't replace it yet, but I would start a savings account for somewhere near what you expect the monthly payment to be. Serves three purposes. You know if you can live with the payment. You have money for repairs already in the bank and if you need a new car you have a cash down payment.
     
  4. metrogruntual

    metrogruntual o__O

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    when you DON'T need one
     
  5. devildog2067

    devildog2067

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    As a former car guy (both in sales and management), let me tell you that the "best" time to buy a car is when you need one. Yes, there may be certain times that the dealership for one reason or another is trying to put together deals and might take a thinner one for you, but as the consumer it's almost impossible to know when those times are--it depends on the manufacturer, the dealership, when the dealership's accounting department closes out their books, what day the salespeople's commissions get paid... Anyone who says "the last Saturday of the month at 6pm is the best time to buy a car" doesn't know what they're talking about.

    Go buy a car when you need one, get the best deal you can, and don't stress out about it too much.
     
  6. devildog2067

    devildog2067

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    The looey is right too--go buy a car when you need one, but not the day your old car explodes. You always want to be able to drive away in your old car if you have to.
     
  7. meathead19

    meathead19

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    4.0 2WD.

    I bought it after the lease was up, so I know what's been done. Another reason to consider keeping I suppose.
     
  8. jollygreen

    jollygreen

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    The end of each month is a good time to buy, because the dealer would like to get rid of inventory before the next month's interest kicks in.

    The end of the year is especially good because not only do they want to avoid the following month's interest payment, they also need to clear out the old models.

    But a good deal can be had on a new car anytime.

    I bought a 2009 V6 Accord last year by contacting, through email, every Honda dealer within a 100 mile radius. I asked for their rock bottom cash price.

    Then I took the lowest price and went to the closest dealer and offered to buy if they could beat the price. They did, but they tried very diligently to sell me stuff I didn't want, like separate insurance for dings and such.

    But in order to get a good deal you can't be wanting some specialty, high demand car. You have to choose something that is likely to just be sitting on the dealer's lot.
     
  9. jollygreen

    jollygreen

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    BTW, I'm looking at a new 4X4 F150 this same way.
     
  10. devildog2067

    devildog2067

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    A) Floorplan interest is rolling, it doesn't "kick in" on a monthly basis.
    B) Most dealerships don't close their month's books on the actual end of the month--we almost always ran until the 2nd or 3rd of the following month. It was stupid but that's what the owner wanted.

    Dealerships are always looking to clear out old inventory--even in the middle of a model year, it's likely that they might have a couple of 100+ day old cars that just haven't sold for whatever reason. The reason to buy at the end of a model year is that manufacturer incentives are better, but even those don't make up for the additional depreciation hit that you'll take. Don't buy at the end of a model year if you're the kind of person who likes to trade cars every few years. DO buy at the end of a model year if you like to keep cars a long (5+ years) time, you will get a better deal from the manufacturer.
     
  11. southernshooter

    southernshooter

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    Over the years I have had some success with rear main bearing seal stop leak products. Might be worth a try.
     
  12. Bilbo Bagins

    Bilbo Bagins Slacked jawed

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    +1

    There is very little wiggle room when you are towing in your trade :rofl:

    From what I hear from September til December is good.

    Also go near end of the month when salespeople are trying get their numbers up.

    Also have you looked at the gas prices. Remember when we had $4 a gallon gas how the Truck & SUV prices dropped. You may want to trade in the jeep now while its still worth something.
     
    Last edited: Nov 15, 2010
  13. meathead19

    meathead19

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    Not looking at new and have no interest to lease again.

    So, it will be something at least 5 yrs old.

    Saw an earlier thread where 2003 maximas were well regarded.....or same year avalons.

    But then, interest rates for those older cars are touching 9%, where as new cars are 0%. I wouldn't be financing much which also hurts.
     
  14. vikingsoftpaw

    vikingsoftpaw DEPLORABLE ME!

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    Actually a bit earlier in the year, when dealers were trying to clear last model year's inventory off of the lot. Economically things are a bit slow this time of year, you might find a dealer willing to deal.
     
  15. jollygreen

    jollygreen

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    Do you mean that dealers buy cars according to an annual percentage rate like anyone else?


    If the interest is computed on a annual percentage rate basis, what difference does it make when (in the month) they close their books?
     
  16. devildog2067

    devildog2067

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    No. Car dealers buy on a floorplan account. Think of it like a giant credit card. Interest starts accruing when a car's invoice amount hits the floorplan.

    There are a lot of other factors than interest. Sales commissions are computed on a month to month basis for example. Personally I always thought pulling the first two days.of next month's cars into this month was stupid, but it's quite common.
     
  17. Peace Warrior

    Peace Warrior Am Yisrael Chai CLM

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    is the last Tuesday of any month after Labor Day and before Valentine's Day, but after 12:30 and before 2 o'clock, which is when the really good veteran salesman are out to lunch and only the new salesman, which are itching for a close, are left to mind the sales floor area.

    trust me... :cool:
     
  18. ThePhoneGuy

    ThePhoneGuy

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    I always look for 'program' cars or lease returns with factory warranty left. Also try to buy when I really don't need one. Got my last SUV when gas hit an alltime high and no one was buying an SUV. Also - and this does not work for everyone - is I tell the salesman upfront I want the best price with all the fees and taxes on it. The out-the-door price. If I like it I buy if I don't I shake hands and walk. It helps to look like an old enough guy to know what I'm doing.
     
  19. devildog2067

    devildog2067

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    True "program" cars are very, very rare (a "program" car is a car that has been used by the corporate parent, IE a Hyundai dealer rep drove the car for 5k miles or whatever, then sold the car to a dealership for a reduced amount). A real program car can be sold for a pretty good deal.

    Most cars that dealerships call "program" cars are either new cars that the owner's wife/kids/whatever put a bunch of miles on, or used rental cars bought at auction. Neither one is a good deal. Dealer demos (the cars that the salespeople drive) are even worse deals.

    Low mileage lease returns are usually a good deal.