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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am just getting started, so excuse the rookie questions I have coming out the gate.

Thankfully, I have been stashing brass for awhile and keep my own once-shot factory brass shot on an indoor range in separate bags from the brass I get on outdoor military ranges.

Despite serving a decade, I had no idea 9mm rounds came with crimped primers..thought only 5.56...until I started digging around around and found some ring-around-the-primer.

Is there a real easy way to process this without doing a 'super swage 600' session one case at a time? That has zero appeal to me at this time. :)

I was hoping there was a Dillon decap and swage die for the 750 and I could just get another toolhead with one swage die, fire up the casefeeder, load with all the 9mm from outdoor range, and go to town...one pull, one swage, auto-fed cases (like the 1050 can do, right?)

I did find a Lee die that seems to do this, but it was exclusive to one of their presses/something or other.

I also plan to add .223/5.56 to the mix probably next Spring after I get dialed-in and expand my knowledge base, so don't mind buying something (cheap) dedicated to processing brass ahead of loading...preferably with the ability to load up the casefeeder and merely pull a handle 1K at a time. :)

Does any of this make sense? Perhaps I am over thinking it w/ 9mm, so being new, I have to show my press and primers respect and not do something stupid as a result of my laziness. lol
 

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best approach for processing crimped primer pockets in both 5.56 & 9mm is don't bother unless you really need the brass - i would save for future if you think brass is going to get scarce or sell to recycler if you have bunch & buy more ammo or unprimed cases - so much 5.56 & 9 brass around you shouldn't need to bother with the crimped stuff -
 

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:agree: I toss it, but the best way is get a 1050. It comes with a swaging station that fixes the crimp after decapping. Imo, a must for 223 reloaders & helpful for 9mm.
 

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In 223 I just borrow a friends Dillon swager and grind it out until I get a bunch done and then I make sure to keep my brass seperate and use until it’s no good.

9mm is not hard brass to acquire so I wouldn’t fool with it. Any local public range should have hundreds of 9mm brass to pickup without crimped pockets.
 

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At a match this past Sunday I shot 130 - 140 rounds of 9mm and came home with 250+ pieces of brass. If any of it is crimped, it will go in the recycle bin.
 

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9mil crimped is so scarce, that I have never thought of it or even seen it when I think about it - and we had Mil and LE shooting at my club all the time.

9mil is so plentiful if you are a shooter, that I have become very selective with brass. A brass snob, if you will?
 

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In the long run...and I have over 30 years of practice, I think I would have been money ahead just have bought the 1050 early and called it good.

Tried teaching a friend about reloading. Let him try everything from a single stage, Turret press, 550 and 1050. Dude takes off running with the 1050 and loads about 300 rounds. Smile on his face was priceless.
 

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I wouldn't take it if I knew the whole lot was crimped. The 1050 cleans up most of mine, but sometimes it doesn't want to de-cap. Not a huge deal. I basically sort my brass on the press. :)
 

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On Ebay they sell a primer pocket swager that fits on the 750. So you can deprime and swage in the same operation. But Dillon frowns on its use. Gary says it will void the warranty. Probably on youtube will have a video of it in operation.There is on the 650.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
:agree: I toss it, but the best way is get a 1050. It comes with a swaging station that fixes the crimp after decapping. Imo, a must for 223 reloaders & helpful for 9mm.
Yea, I saw the 1050 did it, so thought perhaps there's a special die out there for the 750 I could run alone on its on toolhead just to blow through a bag or two on a when the stash gets low.

I'm not worthy of the 1050 yet and the 1yr warranty isn't as appealing, though many saw don't worry about it (they've been plugging along for years and years and years without anything breaking). It still scares me, though. :)

The general consensus is don't bother unless the brass market dries up and I fall on hard brass times. I'll have to pay close attention to the stuff I picked up at mil base. I knew it had to be too good to be true.

Thanks again everyone. Good info and sage advice!
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 · (Edited)
On Ebay they sell a primer pocket swager that fits on the 750. So you can deprime and swage in the same operation. But Dillon frowns on its use. Gary says it will void the warranty. Probably on youtube will have a video of it in operation.There is on the 650.
I wonder if this is it...can see why this is a no-go in Dillon's eyes...wouldn't want to "pop" the press and torque the handle on the upstroke 1000s of times like he's doing (at 2:35 point).


[edit] When he gets going full speed it doesn't look as bad.
 

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yes that is it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
yes that is it.
Nice, thank you, sir...exactly what I envisioned (though I pictured it being a stand-alone die in station#2 and not having to remove the primer system).

Voiding the warranty gives me pause, so will just segregate the crimped crap and avoid for now.

Bonus question: if a crimped primer pocket sneaks by me (honestly didn't plan on scrutinizing every single case...bad enough I have to be on the lookout for .380 and now this lol) that is really tight, I run the risk of seating it sidewise (okay, as I planned to scrutinize every round AFTER I load :) ) or would I more than likely set it off?!?

It'll take a little bit to develop feel and like to avoid the latter.
 

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You can feal a primer going in. If it doesn't feal right stop. yes you can set off a primer especially Federal. I never did on a 550 same priming system as the 750 . But set off twice on the 650 until I got the fealing down of a primer going in.
 
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Florida's Left Coast
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You can feal a primer going in. If it doesn't feal right stop. yes you can set off a primer especially Federal. I never did on a 550 same priming system as the 750 . But set off twice on the 650 until I got the fealing down of a primer going in.
May be something else in play? Maybe I am weak? When I was having adjustment issues with my RF-100 Dillon Primer Filler I seated a couple primers upside-down, a few sideways, but nothing ever lit off. All Fed primers.

Since I took a great deal of time tweaking that filler gizmo, and found an adapter that allows me to directly fill Dillon primer tubes instead of using their big intermediary, proprietary tube, it's been smooth sailing. Don't know why Dillon didn't come up with a way to directly fill their own primer pickup tubes.
 

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I've had and sold a Dillon swager. Too slow for bulk swaging and it indexes off of the web, so different headstamps could have different adjustments needed. It was easy to overswage with little effort because the handle provides you with a lot of leverage.

What I use now is this: https://www.midwayusa.com/product/101286290


For a bunch of brass, I put the swaging rod in a drill and go to town. It only takes a quick touch. If I feel resistance on the priming while loading, I pull the case out and give it a quick swage by hand. Easy, and I'm able to resume loading.
 

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I've been using a Super-Swage for decades, and tens of thousands of rounds of 9MM, .45, .223, .308, .30-06. No big deal.

Run your brass through once and you're done.

Almost all of my .30-06 and .308 brass is MilSurp, so it all started life with a crimped pocket.
 

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I used and use the Dillon 600 swager. I put a coil spring from the thumb lever back and attached to a screw, so all I have to do is put a case on the rod, push it down lower the handle, lift the handle and the case flips off of the rod. I did 3, 20mm ammo cans full of 9mm and one 20mm can of 5.56 a long time ago. Then after we had a house fire they developed legs along with my load data. I just did a jug of crimped brass. But would just do 10 or 20 when walking by or do some until I got tired.

I think now if I had a lot of crimped brass to do. First getting a 1050 is out of the question. I would get the Lee APP and use my Dillon case feeder to feed the brass. Having to fill the tube with brass by hand would be no faster than using the Dillon 600 swager. I mark the brass with a Sharpie so I know it's my brass and that it has been swaged when I go to the indoor range. Around here there is a lot of military brass.
 
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Part of reloading is inspecting your brass. If you do not want to use crimped brass, just discard it. In general, military brass is good stuff. You only need to decrimp it once.

One way around this is get a firearm that doesnt throw brass all over. Revolvers are good for this. I started out reloading for the 44 Magnum. Had an ammo box full of brass. Allowed me to keep track of number of times fired.
 
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