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Bernard Cornwell fans?

Discussion in 'The Book Rack' started by tslex, Aug 27, 2004.

  1. tslex

    tslex

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    Any Bernard Cornwell fans?

    I’ve read all of the Sharpe novels. I enjoy how he’s going back now and filling in new novels in the spaces in the timeline.


    [I read all of Patrick O’Brian’s Aubrey/Maturin books and enjoyed them a lot. Cornwell’s Sharpe books are a little bit lighter fare, but still well put together.]

    I also really enjoyed The Gallows Thief (great look at London in that age and a good mystery) and I’ve liked the first two of the Archer’s Tale Trilogy.
     
  2. BuckeyeRebel

    BuckeyeRebel

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    havent read the sharpe's series but have really enjoyed the starbuck chronicles and his King Arthur series as well as Stonehenge.
     

  3. MrMurphy

    MrMurphy ********* Moderator Lifetime Member Millennium Member

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    I've read all the Sharpe books, own all of the Archer's Tale books and have read most of the others.

    I've read all of Patrick O'brian's stuff too.
     
  4. DonGlock26

    DonGlock26

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    I enjoyed the Sharpe's Rifles series. I watched the T.V. Sharpe's Rifles series on the history channel,too.
     
  5. RetDet

    RetDet Millennium Member

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    Bernard Cornwell is just superb. I really enjoy his stuff.
     
  6. reac

    reac

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    I've been working my way through the Sharpe books and have just about finished them. Great books.

    If you enjoyed those, and O'Brian's Aubrey/Maturin series, then I would recommend C. S. Forrester's Horatio Hornblower series. More great naval tales from the Napoleonic period.
     
  7. MrMurphy

    MrMurphy ********* Moderator Lifetime Member Millennium Member

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    If you like Forester and O'Brian, David Weber's Honor Harrington series is just as good, except it's set in the future in space.


    The good/bad guys and various characters, if you know your history from about 1798 to 1820 or so, are kind of obvious. It's not a direct parallel from history, but some events are pretty close. And he's one dang good writer. Excellent character development, close combat, ship-to-ship stuff with properly supported technical descriptions that actually sound like they work, etc.


    It's interesting how he manages to work two pistol duels, an M1911A1 .45 ACP, executing a space pirate with said .45, and some swordplay into novels set into the future... but he pulls it off believably! ;f

    Even being a sci-fi fan I didn't think I'd like them till I read one. Then I was hooked. I own them all now. Honor Harrington books are sort of like Glocks. It's hard to just own one....
     
  8. reac

    reac

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    It's funny that you should mention this. I was just looking at baen.com the other day and saw some of the Weber books and thought they looked interesting.

    I was wondering what I was going to read after Sharpe's Devil, and I'm a big SF fan, so I'll have to check them out, thanks.
     
  9. MrMurphy

    MrMurphy ********* Moderator Lifetime Member Millennium Member

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    Read "On Basilisk Station" first... then the rest. OTherwise you'll be going "huh?" Since there's about ten books now, maybe more? Will have to count my collection. :)

    And it's sprung off from just David Weber, he's got a couple co-authors in the "Harrington universe" and they're just as good.
     
  10. mrstang01

    mrstang01

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    I like the Sharpe books, and have most of them, but couldn't get into the Harrington books.

    Read the Archer's Tale and Gallows Thief, haven't started on the Starbuck Chronicles yet, but may.

    Michael
     
  11. MrMurphy

    MrMurphy ********* Moderator Lifetime Member Millennium Member

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    There are two more books in the Archer's Tale series. Can't remember the name of the second one, the third is Heretic.
     
  12. rdsharp

    rdsharp

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    The second is Vagabond.
     
  13. jacquejet

    jacquejet

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    Along the lines of historical fiction set in the Napoleanic Wars, has any one read Dewey Lambdin's "Alan Lewrie" series. While not as good as O'brian (what is), the series is easy reading and entertaining. The books are bawdier than the Aubrey books though.

    Also, Alexander Kent has written a series of Naval fiction set in the same time frame that is also good reading.


    "I have only one firm belief about the American political system, and that is this: God is a Republican and Santa Claus is a Democrat....[God] holds men strictly accountable for their actions....[Santa Claus] may know who's been naughty and who's been nice, but he never does anything about it....Santa Claus is preferable to God in every way but one: There is no such thing as Santa Claus." --P.J. O'Rourke
     
  14. GAC

    GAC

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    I like the Sharpe series but after having read so many they get tiring.

    Simon Scarrow was recommended by a Cornwell fan on the bulletin board on Cornwell's website. I read two of Scarrow's books and enjoyed both. Scarrow's books are set in Britain before and after a Roman invasion. He wrote the books as a Roman version of the adventure stories he enjoyed reading.

    Another good historical series is Steven Saylor's Roma Sub Rosa series featuring Gordianus, a Roman type of P.I. Saylor really uses the setting and political intrigue of the times to write good stories.