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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I got a 10/22 and I really like it, but I've been looking around youtube looking at videos of the Model 60 and there seems to be something special about it. Seems to have been everyones first 22 rifle, so I went into my LGS yesterday and picked one up, not bought, just got the chance to handle it. I didn't know how to feel about it.

It felt kinda cheap compared to my 10/22. I didn't like the bolt operation with its half lock open, and I really didn't care for the tubular magazine. I like the 10 and 25rd box magazines for my 10/22 and the 10/22 bolt operation much better. But the more I watch videos and read about it, I kinda want to actually pick one up just to have as a beater 22 rifle, something I can toss in the back of the truck and take to the farm or range and not care too much about, or if I ever get into small game hunting it would be a good gun to take out into the woods and not worry too much if it gets scratched up. For $180 I don't think I would care too much if the stock got scratched up of whatever. I don't neglect my guns but this might be the one gun I could shoot and not clean unless it starts malfunctioning. Maybe slap a cheap scope on it from Walmart and call it a day

Should I bite the bullet and get the Model 60 just to see what it's all about or get a synthetic stock 10/22 to beat up on?
 

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Semper Fi
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First of all Yes you should buy a model 60.

No you shouldn't buy a new one.

Yes you should find an older model 60 and snap it up.

I have a model 60 from 1982 with the 18 shot tube and have no idea how many rounds have been put through it, 100,000 for sure. I learned how to shoot on it and I trained all 3 of my kids with it. We still take it along on range days to plink with and I snatch it up and feel like a kid again. It's still amazingly accurate and would put it up against any stock 10/22.

The downside...no aftermarket to speak of. What you see is what you get. The 10/22 has a huge aftermarket.

There are pages and pages and pages of info on the Model 60 and it's variants. You will hear people tell you that you have to look for the "JM" ( John Marlin ) stamp on the barrel to get a good one. Thats not necessarily true. Although the JM stamp is a good thing to have not all Marlins got the stamp in the pre remington days.

The newer rifles do feel lighter and "plasitcy". Remington bought Marlin sometime in 2007 and things have been downhill ever since. I would look previous to that date for a good Model 60 example. IMHO your would preferably look for a much older rifle like the mid to early 80's and before.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
First of all Yes you should buy a model 60.

No you shouldn't buy a new one.

Yes you should find an older model 60 and snap it up.

I have a model 60 from 1982 with the 18 shot tube and have no idea how many rounds have been put through it, 100,000 for sure. I learned how to shoot on it and I trained all 3 of my kids with it. We still take it along on range days to plink with and I snatch it up and feel like a kid again. It's still amazingly accurate and would put it up against any stock 10/22.

The downside...no aftermarket to speak of. What you see is what you get. The 10/22 has a huge aftermarket.

There are pages and pages and pages of info on the Model 60 and it's variants. You will hear people tell you that you have to look for the "JM" ( John Marlin ) stamp on the barrel to get a good one. Thats not necessarily true. Although the JM stamp is a good thing to have not all Marlins got the stamp in the pre remington days.

The newer rifles do feel lighter and "plasitcy". Remington bought Marlin sometime in 2007 and things have been downhill ever since. I would look previous to that date for a good Model 60 example. IMHO your would preferably look for a much older rifle like the mid to early 80's and before.
Yea, the rifle I got to handle yesterday felt "plasticy", which is a good word for it, it felt like it was made of cheap plastic from the dollar store, even though most of the rifle is made from metal. I really wish I could buy a used one, but the used market here sucks and comes out to about 8-10 racks at Cabela's mostly comprised of used shotguns and bolt action rifles. The few 22's they have are really, really worn and the ones that aren't, they're trying to sell for more than a new gun. They're trying to sell your basic used Ruger 10/22 with a wood stock for $399, yet that same 10/22 new sells for $269 about 50 feet away behind the main counter. We only have a few gun stores around here and none of them have a big used selection. I think if I had to choose between a new Marlin 60 and a new 10/22, I'd get the 10/22 hands down.

I also really like the aftermarket support for the 10/22. If I scratch up the stock really bad I can just buy a new one, I also prefer the box mag of the Ruger and the feel of the Ruger.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Gunbroker has good examples often and usually very reasonable.
Question for you, have you ever felt weird sticking your hand out in front of the muzzle in order to pull out the tube mag? I tried a few used rifles at cabela's with tube mags and it felt really awkward sticking my hand out in front of the muzzle.
 

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Question for you, have you ever felt weird sticking your hand out in front of the muzzle in order to pull out the tube mag? I tried a few used rifles at cabela's with tube mags and it felt really awkward sticking my hand out in front of the muzzle.
I haven’t. Never gave that a thought. Just like pulling the trigger to field strip a Glock. Just be safe about it.
 

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Semper Fi
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Question for you, have you ever felt weird sticking your hand out in front of the muzzle in order to pull out the tube mag? I tried a few used rifles at cabela's with tube mags and it felt really awkward sticking my hand out in front of the muzzle.
I only opened the tube when the weapon was 100% empty and the bolt locked open. So no, I wasn’t uncomfortable with it.
 

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I only opened the tube when the weapon was 100% empty and the bolt locked open. So no, I wasn’t uncomfortable with it.
Ditto. Shoot until empty. Make safe. Verify. Reload. Tens of thousands of rounds through it and I’ve never “topped off”.
 

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Philippians 4: 6-7
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I use to own a Marlin model 60 but sold it a few years ago. I bought it probably 25+ years ago. I was a nice 22 rifle.
 
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I use to own a Marlin model 60 but sold it a few years ago. I bought it probably 25+ years ago. I was a nice 22 rifle.
Seems like everyone ends up selling theirs after awhile, wonder why that is. I'm curious to see what all the hype is about the Model 60, and for $180 I think I could overlook the tube mag and odd bolt operation for just a kick around 22 rifle
 

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Wood butcher
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I bought one of the new Marlins about three months ago. Hasn't missed a beat so far with about a brick and half through it. Love it - takes me back as that model (Coast to Coast Glenfield) was the first I owned at 12.
 

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Philippians 4: 6-7
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Seems like everyone ends up selling theirs after awhile, wonder why that is. I'm curious to see what all the hype is about the Model 60, and for $180 I think I could overlook the tube mag and odd bolt operation for just a kick around 22 rifle
I just never shot mine anymore and decided sell it to someone that probably would. I think I paid about $60 for mine back then.
 
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Did the slow, cumbersome loading have anything do to with the selling of it?
Make yourself some homemade speed loaders. I can't take a picture of mine until next weekend.

Various DIY versions out there you can web search for. A couple commercial models out there as well. Search for tube magazine loader.

Clear tube with inside diameter a little larger than .22, cut to length for full load and a bit more.
Superglue on one end a bolt thread protective cap.
Plug remaining end with couple inch long wood dowel.
 

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I much prefer the 10/22 Ruger to the model 60 especially a new Marlin made by "The Freedom Group" (Cerebus Capital Mandgment), although I wouldn't mind having one of the older "Papoose" takedown models that was made when Marlin was still a reputable company.

Forget the Marlin Get a synthetic stock Ruger if you want a "beater" I bought one at Bi-mart last year for under $200 bucks, in fact I bought two of them, One with the synthetic stock, and one with the wooden stock.

My first 10-22 I bought in 1970 and I wish I still had it. My most accurate 10-22 is a Ruger charger with an aftermarket bull barrel and a trigger job.
 

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Wood butcher
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Just goes to show the difference in people - I prefer the Marlin. I've had Ruger 10-22s and while they worked fine, just never "connected" with them. The Marlin also reliable with a synthetic stock that is comfortably under $200.

To myself, the Marlin feels slimmer and balances better for carry. I think they load faster than the rotary mag and is a "contained" rifle with no mags to remember; it's also easier to take down for cleaning. My newer one has the last shot hold open and is every bit as reliable and dependable as the one I had as a kid. It's a good option for someone who has no desire to modify. While I have better options in .22s to shoot, the Marlin is always there for fun.
 
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Philippians 4: 6-7
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