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MacGyver
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7,185 Posts
Though I agree the G34 doesn't need to be ported to shoot it fast, when trying to reduce muzzle flip, every little bit helps. If I were going to port a G34, I'd have it done EXACTLY like the OEM G19c. Also, I'd have the ports as close to the muzzle as possible...not so much for more fps (though it helps, some), but for more leverage. 9mm is a bit weak, so the closer to the muzzle end of the barrel, the better the ports work, and the few fps gained also aids in more pressure to the ports. The downside to ports as far forward as possible is some of that extra leverage gets from the barrel to the slide. It may disrupt cycling. You'd have to keep that area lubed with a high temp syn grease and it'll get dirty, fast. If you clean it after every range session or every couple hundred rounds, you'd be ok. If you can't find someone to do it like the G19c, but closer to the muzzle, I'd pass.
Forging you own path can get you lost- the fact that OP is asking whoever will answer on the internet means, he does not understand. Better to spend the money on shooting classes.

You are getting into the weeds with complexity, care and maintenance-- all for minor effect that does not compensate for poor shooting skills. The best way to have a ported Glock is to have a Glock factory ported-- then you assume that they did the necessary R&D to properly mechanically port the tool, and that the timing works-- but then you have to R&D to discover what ammo works best.
 

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38 Posts
The worst choice would be to take a Glock 34 Gen 5 and have a port cut into it. Totally defeats the purpose of the Gen 5 Glock 34.

The Glock 34 Gen 5 is, in my mind, now a superb choice for duty because of the fact it no longer has the huge cut out on the top of the slide.
 

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Though I agree the G34 doesn't need to be ported to shoot it fast, when trying to reduce muzzle flip, every little bit helps. If I were going to port a G34, I'd have it done EXACTLY like the OEM G19c. Also, I'd have the ports as close to the muzzle as possible...not so much for more fps (though it helps, some), but for more leverage. 9mm is a bit weak, so the closer to the muzzle end of the barrel, the better the ports work, and the few fps gained also aids in more pressure to the ports. The downside to ports as far forward as possible is some of that extra leverage gets from the barrel to the slide. It may disrupt cycling. You'd have to keep that area lubed with a high temp syn grease and it'll get dirty, fast. If you clean it after every range session or every couple hundred rounds, you'd be ok. If you can't find someone to do it like the G19c, but closer to the muzzle, I'd pass.
Like stated in the post directly above yours, ported barrel puts that pistol in USPSA open division competing against full on race guns. It’s a bad idea.
 

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...
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17,567 Posts
I had a gen 3 20c 10mm and tried shooting it side by side with the ported barrel and with a non-ported barrel using different power level ammo and I couldn't tell much difference.

Then I got to shoot a Gen 3 20sf and immediately sold the 20c and bought a 20sf. Now I wish I'd bought the SF and swapped slides and put the 20c slide on the SF frame and sold the remaining gun just because of the "Cool" factor of the 20c and the fact that they don't make them anymore.
 

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MacGyver
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7,185 Posts
"cool factor" is only good for impressing other MEN, and personal mental fantasies about absent guns skills...you cannot realistically expect your ported gun to get any "oooh, ahhs" to achieve hook-ups of the physical sort.
 

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I'm not retired
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7,208 Posts
The worst choice would be to take a Glock 34 Gen 5 and have a port cut into it. Totally defeats the purpose of the Gen 5 Glock 34.
Port vents in the slide wouldn't be nearly as large as the cut out in the Gen 4 34 if it is done like the 19c...the only way I'd have a Gen 5 34 done, as I stated before.
 

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I'm not retired
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7,208 Posts
Like stated in the post directly above yours, ported barrel puts that pistol in USPSA open division competing against full on race guns. It’s a bad idea.
The OP doesn't say anything about using the gun to compete with. I based my response off this gun being a range toy and the fact that correctly done, it will reduce muzzle flip, some. If it puts in open but it's not used to compete, who cares???
 

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I'm not retired
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7,208 Posts
Forging you own path can get you lost- the fact that OP is asking whoever will answer on the internet means, he does not understand. Better to spend the money on shooting classes.

You are getting into the weeds with complexity, care and maintenance-- all for minor effect that does not compensate for poor shooting skills. The best way to have a ported Glock is to have a Glock factory ported-- then you assume that they did the necessary R&D to properly mechanically port the tool, and that the timing works-- but then you have to R&D to discover what ammo works best.
Again, if this is a range toy, none of this matters, but I did express I'd only have it done if it's exactly like the G19c. He's doing it to an AM barrel so if the gun has failures, all he's stuck with is two small slide vents in his slide. Even for a 10% reduction in muzzle flip and recoil, it's worth the risk to try it if you can throw that much money out the window and it not effect your budget.

Even a great shooter will shoot better with an identical gun that has less muzzle flip and recoil (say shooting ported and not ported Gen 5 34's side by side). I don't disagree, at all, training is key, but with money to burn, why not? Just trying to be objective.
YportinganonportedgunissuretohavesomeheadachesMMV
 

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Discussion Starter #29
Thanks to all who have replied. The gun will be a range toy only, and my open gun for GSSF so I’m just thinking of ways to get the most out of it. A RDS will be the first thing, after that we will see lol
 
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