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Barrel Care for Glocks

Discussion in 'General Glocking' started by ghost_rider012, Apr 8, 2007.

  1. ghost_rider012

    ghost_rider012

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    Hi All

    Just was wondering if the same type of fowling that builds up in a rifle barrel (carbon, cooper, powder) builds up in a handgun barrel? I have been using "Birchwood-Casey 2 in 1 bore scrubber" with great results but wanted to know if there is anything better out there in the form of a all in one solvent that I should be using. I don't shoot lead bullets and I clean my glocks after every shooting outing. Any cleaning techniques would also be helpful if anyone would like to share.

    Thank you
     
  2. ppd1108

    ppd1108

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    I just started using Hoppe's Elite Bore Cleaner. Very good stuff. I had a 686 that had so much crud in the cylinders from firing 38's that 357's would not fit. About 10 min and two uses of the Hoppe's and the cylinder looks brand new.
     

  3. AV8R

    AV8R

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    The trend in barrel cleaning seems to be "Less is Better." The abrasive and strong chemical cleaners supposedly erode barrels faster than shooting does. Hoppes products, and other petroleum-solvent based cleaners are supposedly safe. Kroil is a good solvent which penetrates carbon deposits and loosens them. A lot of bench rest guys use it exclusively. I use Marvel Mystery Oil. The secret ingredient is an ester, oil of wintergreen, which is about the best penetrant there is. It was originally developed by Marvel Carburetor Co. in WWII, as a carbon and varnish solvent for aircraft engines, and it works very, very well. A bronze brush is a bit too aggressive; time to soak, and a clean patch is best. An old Vietnam sniper trick is to fire a round after a gentle solvent cleaning. Supposedly, the gunpowder leaves a residue that inhibits corrosion in wet climates.