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Bark Collar Advice

Discussion in 'Woof Memorial Critter's Corner' started by DennisH, Apr 26, 2007.

  1. DennisH

    DennisH FFG-60

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    We have three dogs, two lab/mixes and a beagle/weeine dog mix (aka "the Weagle") and we love all three. All are rescue dogs. Our problem is with the Weagle. Whenever somebody, somebody with a dog, or just another dog goes by the house, or when we're taking a walk, she emits the loudest and most annoying shrill half bark/half squeal you've ever heard. We need to correct this behavior, that has just gotten worse, soon! Any suggestions for a safe bark collar that won't zap the poor critter?
     
  2. cav_pilot

    cav_pilot

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    We have had to use one for ours. I got a Petsafe collar about 18 months and have been pleased with it. The first one quit working after a couple of months and after a quick call to the company they mailed a new one out with no questions asked except a request to send them the old one within a couple of weeks. It's been fine since then.

    Petsafe bark collar
     

  3. G20man32904

    G20man32904 Deceased

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    There is nothing a 6ft leash and collar can't do that a bark collar can do. Pay a trainer with the money instead, you will learn much more than your money's worth. :)
     
  4. pjrocco

    pjrocco Rock

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    Don't use a bark collar. If you must, I suggest you put it on yourself first and let me know if you still want to use it.

    Keep a collar and leash on him at all times, when he does it correct... Treat and praise when he is quiet. It will take some effort but it is worth it.
     
  5. cav_pilot

    cav_pilot

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    I have felt it and it ain't that bad. We went to a trainer for about 6 weeks and she is great on a leash, but the problem occurs when she is let out in the backyard during the day. If people or dogs are around (we have a lot of neighborhood walkers) she goes nuts. The shock itself is really a non issue now anyway because she doesn't bark when she wears it. Problem solved in my opinion, and she is none the worse for wear.
     
  6. pjrocco

    pjrocco Rock

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    Do you let her out all day when you are not home?
     
  7. G20man32904

    G20man32904 Deceased

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    Yeah pj, he probably does. Lots of folks do this and it is totally acceptable to them. It's his dog, and it doesn't qualify as abuse, because "some" dogs actually like it. Let it go... :)


    Dennis,
    Here are 2 points of view, 1 from a pilot(?)

    and 1 from a dog trainer

    No offense cav pilot, I was a First team member myself. :patriot:

    Mike
     
  8. Glockcoma711

    Glockcoma711

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    My mom had a barking problem with her Maltese. Little thing would never stop barking when let outside in the backyard. Finally after a couple neighborly complaints I finally suggested my mom changed her routine. Instead of just letting the lil dog outside in the backyard I told her that she should start going on walks with her around the neighborhood. I don't know what it was but the dog stopped barking after about a week and half of walking. I guess it got used to what was on the other side of the fence. My mom now walks her everyday and the barking is no more. Its healthy both for my mom and her lil fendi.

    I would try alternative methods rather then resorting to shock treatments.
     
  9. Spectre66

    Spectre66

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    This is the first time I've posted in this area of the forum but dealing with the same issue as the OP right now I feel compelled to say something. I realize alot of people have a negative view of electric collars, not just talking about the bark collars, but they aren't as bad as they once were.

    I've had hunting dogs around for most of my life, and as most bird hunters are aware electric collars have been in use for bird dog training for decades. I look back at the first few I saw my dad use and I have no doubt how they got the bad name that they have. It use to be that you had to set the collar for the level of stimulation, put it on the dog and hope that the setting you put it on was the right one. It was more common than not that the collar was set higher than it should be because dogs would get excited in the course of training and lower levels of stimulation wouldn't be effective. It was very common to see a dog yell out because the stimulation was far to high for the circumstance.

    Now fast forward 20 years, improvements in electric collars have been incredible. Now stimulation levels are remotely set so it can be increased or decreased based on what is nessicary. Now trainers can really dial in to the point the dog recognizes the stimulation but before it actually hurts the dog. So how does that work? You put the collar on the dog on the lowest setting, you then increase one level at a time until the dog makes some indication he felt it. Most commonly the point of recognition is marked by a twitch of an ear or just a look of confusion. What they feel is very similar to your hand falling asleep. You might ask how do I know what the dog feels? Well, that's because I've shocked myself on all of its settings to fully understand what it feels like. I suggest anyone who uses this type of collar to do the same.

    So you might ask what is the value of an electric collar? Well, for one you can correct a problem from a distance without being involved. Imagine having a dog that habitually digs up your back yard. Now imagine using a collar and making the dog think that the dirt is causing this strange and uncomfortable sensation while you are hidden away in your house watching him through an upstairs window. I'm sure you see my point.

    Now, back to the OP's problem. Would I suggest a bark collar? Not really, generally they make them as cheaply as possible and that results in some issues. Would I recommend a remote electric collar? Maybe, but most people can't afford to spend $300-$500 on a good quality collar just to correct a barking issue. I suggest you look into what is called a "Figure 8". This is nothing more than a piece of rope that puts pressure on the dogs mouth when he tries to bark. The dog can eat, drink, whatever, its not intended to tie the dogs mouth shut, only to provide stimulation on the top of the mouth. For more information on the figure 8, how to make one and the proper use take a look at http://www.huntsmith.com/resources.php#videos
    You will see 2 videos that outline what a figure 8 is and how to use it.
     
  10. G20man32904

    G20man32904 Deceased

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    The figure 8 still does not address the core problem.
    It's like treating a broken arm with morphine, yes it will help, but until you set and immoblize the bones, it will not fix the problem. And only the Alpha can do that. ;)
     
  11. pjrocco

    pjrocco Rock

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    :agree: :goodpost: