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Baitcasting Reel

Discussion in 'Hunting, Fishing & Camping' started by Taipei Personality, Apr 9, 2006.

  1. Taipei Personality

    Taipei Personality

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    I decided that I wanted something for bass a bit better than a Zebco 202 and bought a matched Daiwa baitcasting rod and reel. I adjusted the clutch and drag as described HERE, but I still get backlash. If I tighten the clutch until there's no backlash I'm rewarded with five foot casts. What am I doing wrong?
     
  2. btoler

    btoler

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    I let my thumb rest on top of the line spool and control it that way. After a while you will get used to casting and can do it by adjusting the tension. I usually wait till the end of the line hits the water then press firmly on the spool to stop it from over spinning. Good Luck
     

  3. noway

    noway

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    Practice and practice, is all I can say. If yours have the magnetic clutch in it, it helps to loosen it all up and then re-adj. You might also have to play around with the line you buy & use. Some are better than others YMMV. The thinner lines .09-10 works better than a bigger LB line which would be thicker for the obvious reasons.

    I have 3 baitcaster ( 2 quantums 1 shimano ) for freshwater and they incoporate different lines and adjustments to get them to work 100% faultlessly. All of them magnetic or centrigural weights for the internal function. But how I adjust mine is;

    1> loose the flywheel knob with the line tied on to the lure that you planning on using.

    2> loosen it so the weight of the lure falls with the rod pointed up. And then add one more quarter turn.

    3> You then adjust the centrigufal or magentic brake to match your lure and casting speeds.


    Also not to be a pain in the ***, but make sure you AREN"T trying to throw a lite lure/bait on a baitcaster. I figure I would throw this out ( pun intended ) just incase you didn't know ;) If you are, then buy a heavier lure and start with that first before trying to cast a lighter lure.

    Casting methods, lure weight and wind can all play havoc on a baitcaster setup and specially with a newbie. Even PROs and experience runs across a birdnest ( back lash ) once in awhile ;)
     
  4. punkture

    punkture

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    there are some reels that are hard to backlash and others are inevitable for even a seasoned fisherman to experience the occasional backlash. if all else fails, run to walmart and pick up a cheap garcia 5000 or 5500 (5500c was my preference until bass proshop came out with their "viper" combo...which is actually just a 7 bearing pflueger with the bass pro name on it). i have a shakespeare that no one i know can throw more than a few times without backlashing it. practice may be all you need, but keep in mind, there are some reels that just love to backlash. can't go wrong with a garcia, other than the fact that they don't make em like they used to and have frequent worm gear issues.
     
  5. Taipei Personality

    Taipei Personality

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    Thanks for the input, all.

    I've tried the thumb on the reel, but I seem to get it too late. Practice, practice . . .

    I think mine has a centrifugal or magnetic brake. There's a dial on the left side, i.e., opposite of the clutch and drag, numbered "off" - 10. I've tried it at various settings and it does seem to be a bit better at a higher setting.

    I tried it first with 6 lb. line and then with 12 lb. line, with the same result each time. I'm using a Carolina rig with a plastic worm, barrel swivel, 18" leader, and a 1/4 oz. weight.

    I'll keep adjusting and working at it. Thanks!
     
  6. wade farley

    wade farley Sonic 357 sig

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    :cool: That's the way I do it too! Of course, you can always use the Baitcaster for trolling! Have fun & stay safe!:supergrin:
     
  7. noway

    noway

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    You might want to try on of the baitcasters setup that allows for you to use the thumb on the rls lever as a brake. Wehn you cast you hold the thumb down on the lever. Once the lure makes contact with the water ( line slows down but the spool with keep on spining ) then you release the lever which stops the spools.

    This is not the idea normal way that most people operate a BC reel and is awkard if you go to a reel setup that doesn't have this feature, but it is the easiest to learn on.
    You can also manage the same effect as mention above with the thumb resting on the spool. In effect you are doing the same thing. You have to slow/stop the spool once the lure hits the water. If not the spool will spin faster than the line speed causing a birdnest.

    Don't give up yet ;)
     
  8. Taipei Personality

    Taipei Personality

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    Thanks, I'm still plugging away at it! :) If nothing else, I'm getting great practice at clearing backlashes.
     
  9. nipperwolf

    nipperwolf

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    first, carolina rigs were designed to be used with heavier weights. 3/4 to 1oz.

    second, the best way to learn is to throw something heavy and wind resistant. tie on a 3/8 or 1/2oz rattle trap and cast away.
     
  10. StockGlock23

    StockGlock23 Hilarious!

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    Another tip that may help you. I assume you are right handed and cast with your right arm correct? If so as you are hold the rod in your hand when you cast turn your wrist in 1/4 turn so that the reel handle is facing down when you cast. The spool will be vertical and this makes the line spool of much better than if you leave your hand horizontal. I can cast ultra light crankbaits and even finesse worms with this method. It totally reduced my backlashes to nearly zero. Also another tip is once the lure hit the water, place your thumb on the reel spool and manually pull off about 2 feet of line and then lock the reel. No matter what you will always have slack in the line and a little loop like that is what creates those snarls. The last tip helps even with spinning reels.
     
  11. Taipei Personality

    Taipei Personality

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    Yep, I'm right-handed. That makes sense, I'll give it a try. Thanks!
     
  12. David N.

    David N.

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    I bought a Shimano baitcasting reel and practiced with it for months. Tried everything to get it right: heavy lures, light lures, thumb on the spool, more tension, less tension...but the only thing I was only getting better at was untangling line. Then finally I tried something that made me pretty good with a baitcasting reel. An Abu Garcia 5500 c3. Now I can't remember the last time I used anything besides an AG.
     
  13. KodiakG-22C

    KodiakG-22C

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    Baitcasters!!

    I do a lot of bass fishing. My bass boat is loaded with baitcasters and spinning reels.
    I see guys buying baitcasters that end up throwing them into the lake after about the 4th birds nest!! The thing you need to remember is EVERYONE gets them. Most more than others. I will get one once in a while. Usually trying to cast into the wind with a spinner bait. One thing to keep in mind is when buying fishing equipment is You get what you pay for! I don't own a reel that is under $100. I know most people cant and or wont spent that kind of money but the backlash problems and overall use of the expensive reels are well worth it.
    I think the problem most people have is trying to cast something to light. I don't recommend this unless your a seasoned veteran of baitcasters. Also when your first starting out with one it's best to use something a little on the heavy side and go into the back yard and make short cast. It helps out to start with flipping or pitching the lure at first to get used to using your thumb as a break. After you get that down pretty good move back a little and make longer cast until you have the hang of it.
    YOU DO NOT need to make a hard cast using a baitcaster. "That's another Rookie mistake" Nice an easy is all you need. In fact the only thing I cast that I use an "Over Head" motion is when I'm throwing a Top Water Bait and that's only in open water out over some flat. Most of the time if I'm fishing a shore line its just a flip or pitch. You really don't want to make long cast most of the time anyways. The longer the cast the more that can go wrong with the fish before you land it.
    I also think the heaver line is best. I never put anything on my baitcasters under 15lb test. Most of mine I use 17-20lb. And when you do get a mess in there the bigger line is easier to fix because you can see it better.
    YES Spool adjustment is critical. Loosen your spool to the point the lure will fall on it's own when you let off the line with your thumb. Then you adjust from there. This is located between the handle and the body of the reel. It's usually the only thing you can adjust on that side of the reel next to the BIG Star thing on the handle. That is the drag! I usually just crank that thing down.

    Well I know this has been kind of long. BUT I'm in Michigan and I haven't got the boat out yet so I'm getting excited!! I Love to talk FISHING!!!
     
  14. BlackBelt

    BlackBelt

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    I live on a lake chocked full of bass. I have used many different reels, and the one that I'm sold on is a Shimano baitcaster.
    I have friends at BassPro Shop that told me that the reels badged "BassPro" suck. They come back all the time defective. They told me to try the Shimano, because that's what they use. Now they come fishing with me all the time (we're going tonight, as a matter of fact), and the REALLY do use the Shimanos. You really do get what you pay for in baitcasters (except maybe those $700 reels that have a computer in them...I don't know about them...).
    Backlashes are a part of life. The more you use the reel, and learn the adjustments, the less headache they cause you. I've seen pro's on the B.A.S.S. tournaments get backlashes, so don't let it trouble you too much. It's just part of the 'fun' of fishing!
     
  15. hi speed

    hi speed 10MMGLOCKROCKER

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    Backlashes are the excuses used to explain how that big one got away. Never the less, a lot of practice in the yard with a low weight hookless lure will improve your abilities beyond what you think. I don't even use the clutches or brakes. I remove the weights and use the opposing digit to control distance and entry splash. The key is to stop forward momentum right before the lure enters the water. Practice, practice, practice. It's just like dry firing at the bad guys on TV.
     
  16. noway

    noway

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    Here's one of my favorite baitcster, it's a shimano curado LH laced up with 8lb line. I use it when drifiting and casting 6" plastic worms for bass for the most of the time. It use centrifugal weights and works great on a medium action 6ft rod.

    I've caught some of my biggest bass on a this reel ( $129.00 ) rod ( $39.99 ).
     
  17. GUNZEALOT

    GUNZEALOT Up all night

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    I also like the Abu Garcia Ambassador series, I have 3 of them. Here are some things that helped me when I started using them: When learning, avoid casting into the wind. Use heavier lures. Use your thumb as a break. Start slowing the spool down before the lure hits the water and it should be stopped by the time the lure hits water. Set the brake according the weight of each lure. Put the lure on, let out a couple feet of line, have the rod parallel to the ground and twitch the tip a couple of inches. If the break is set right the lure should slowly fall. That is a starting point, then adjust the brake to your liking and conditions.
     
  18. lethal tupperwa

    lethal tupperwa

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    Hold the rod sideways handle up or down but have your palm facing down.

    You have less line drag on the rod this way and your wrist works better in this position.

    I cast right handed but use a left handed reel-handle on left side.

    So for me the reel handle is down.

    Don't try to kill it.

    Just use your wrist.

    Keep your thumb on the spool until the rod is going forward. Letting the lure start backward and making slack while it tries to catch up is a snarl for sure.

    As the lure nears the water move your thumb back to the spool and start to add pressure I put my thumb on the edge of the spool sometimes not always on the line.

    Don't fill the spool All The Way up to the edge.

    I leave 1/16 of an inch. Usually the first snarl you cut out will take it down to there anyway.

    When you fill the reel with line, place the spool of line flat on the ground run the line down the rod to the reel and with thumb and finger making light tension on the line turn the handle 10 times. (I find it is easier to do it this way by myself.)This is done with the rod tip at least 4 to 5 feet above the spool of line.

    Now move the rod tip near the spool If the line Twists up into a mess Turn the spool of line over and go on filling the spool. Twisted line is like trying to cast a slinky.

    The tension is important to wrap the line evenly without loose spots in it.

    If you have these loose spots you will push loops up through the line on the reel when you try to cast.

    When you rewind the line from a cast you should apply the same light tension to the line.

    Remember this an overrun occurs Any time the spool speed is Greater than the lure speed.

    Many things effect the lure speed a gust of wind, hitting something like a branch, or hitting the water.

    The rod should be marked with recommended lure weight and line weight.

    The things that effect the spool speed are brakes, magnets, and The only thing that is infinitely variable Your Thumb.

    Do you remember seeing a Pro with a toothpick stuck in their hat or behind their ear?

    It makes a great tool for removing the professional overruns.
     
  19. nipperwolf

    nipperwolf

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    that is the preffered method for spinning and spincast reels, but not baitcasters.

    Put pencil through holes in new line spool
    Have someone hold pencil or hold it between your feet
    Make sure line comes off new line spool in the same direction it will go on the new spool (reel spool and line spool turning same way)
    Hold line tight with left hand just above reel
    Reel line onto reel slowly, making sure it is spooled tightly


    this way, it will go on with no twist.
     
  20. lethal tupperwa

    lethal tupperwa

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    You are correct.

    I Said on the floor is the easiest way If you are by yourself.

    The holding it with your feet thing is interesting.

    The pencil thing works well If you have two people and

    They remember to put some light pressure against the spool of line.

    You can get overruns on the line spool also.

    And check after 10 turns of the reel handle (by putting slack in the line to see if it snarls)

    I used to sell sporting goods and would like to have a dollar for every reel I filled.

    The machine we used had a tensioner to wind evenly. It mounted the spools the same way the reels were mounted differently.

    It is funny but somehow not all spools are filled the same way

    And what seems like it should be the right way isn't.

    You'll find yourself kinking (twisting) the line.