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I'm your huckleberry....
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I decided to swap my '-' connector and NY1 spring set up for the original connector and coil spring. (Butch made me do it!!! :supergrin:) So it's for my Gen3 G19 which musta been made before the trigger bar with the notch at bottom to center the spring (???) was introduced.

I had the smooth trigger shoe instead of the stepped trigger shoe that I put in years ago. BUT ... the smooth bar had the older non-notched bar in it.

Opinions: do you think I could file a slight notch in the older, smooth bar and I'd be OK? Just a tiny notch to try to get a similar rear spring attachment with the older style trigger bar. I'd file a bit, sand, smooth and keep rough edges from appearing.

Before I get too much blow-back - 1) I'm cheap :supergrin:, 2) it doesn't look like that big of a deal, and 3) I'm lazy. Could it - WOULD it - work without issue? Or can you speculate? New trigger bar is about $15 shipped from eBay. Yes, I can be that cheap!
 

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I've done it prior to ordering a new-design Gen3 trigger bar. It's difficult to determine if it helped as not all trigger springs will break in old-style trigger bars.

You may also want to enlarge and chamfer the hole in the trigger bar which the spring goes through too. I seem to recall this was another redesign change which was made between the old-style trigger bars and newer ones.
 

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And I thought I’m a tight wad!
 

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I'm your huckleberry....
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
You made need a diamond embedded dremel attachment to do the filing.
I've got one shaped like a flame and I was gonna use the very tip (fine, fine point...) and just nick the bottom of the bar. Then chamfer, sand and cleanup as necessary. If it goes well I might know tomorrow.
 

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I'm your huckleberry....
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I've done it prior to ordering a new-design Gen3 trigger bar. It's difficult to determine if it helped as not all trigger springs will break in old-style trigger bars..
I'm gonna use a fine, fine Dremel bit shaped like a flame. Using the tip for the initial "nick" and then clean the area as needed to make sure all edges are smooth. I just wasn't sure how helpful the new style trigger bar 's notch was. Figured I had an older one with smooth shoe. Why waste it? Just wanted some input on how doing it would improve the trigger bar. Got the old stepped shoe bar in for now, I'll play with it tomorrow.

Thanks for the replies.
 

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It's a $10 part.

If there is a GSSF match coming near you, the armorer will update it at NO charge.

Factory trigger springs are about $2. It will take a long time and a lot of rounds for it to fail.
 

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What a terrible idea!

You will make things much worse by half-a$$ing a groove or notch at the pre-2010 trigger bar's coil trigger spring attachment point. Besides, the short simple TS attachment point on a pre-2010 trigger bar doesn't even need such a thing.

The changes made to Gen4-style trigger bars and to post-2010 Gen3 trigger bars distribute the stress across a length of the TS hook...instead of all the pressure being exerted at just one point on the hook. This improved trigger bar design has added curved metal surface on which the hook lays and a groove on that surface to help keep the hook aligned properly on the curved surface. But these changes actually make it much easier than the pre-2010 version to reassemble the pistol with the Trigger Spring hook incorrectly canted left or right, if there is inattention to detail during reassembly.

There's no grinding or cutting or filing or drilling or anything else on a pre-2010 trigger bar that will create the improvements of the new trigger bar design for reducing trigger spring hook failure. The rough and sharp edges left by an amateur rework attempt are much more likely to cause coil Trigger Spring hook early failure than had everything just been left alone.

Also, it seems historically that the trigger spring hook fails more often at the other end, where the trigger spring attaches to the polymer trigger mechanism housing. The post-2010 TMH corrects that as well by rounding the TS attachment point on the TMH.

The only wise approach to all of this is to install a current Trigger With Trigger Bar AND a current Trigger Mechanism Housing. They will have all the proper improvements. Be sure to install a new coil trigger spring as well.

One of the nice things about the Gen5/G42/G43 design is the redesigned hookless trigger spring that should almost never fail. The pre-Gen5 coil trigger spring is the part that breaks most often on a Glock pistol.
 

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Wow, so you’re going to use a Dremel and file on one of the main fire control parts in your handgun? Savage move!

Is this pistol ever actually carried? Or is it strictly a range toy that gets taken to the range in a bag and is unloaded to and from?

I wouldnt trust my life or even someone elses life to something that was filed and ground down because you dont want to spend $10 to do it the right way. If that bar or the spring fails, you now have a funny shaped rock to try and throw at someone.

But good luck with that! You have taken “cheap” to a whole new level. Thats some weapons grade **** right there!
 

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When You Throw The Glock, Hold the front end between thumb and index finger to cause more spin on the pistol when it leaves the hand. Makes it harder to catch.
Back to business, Just go on and buy the new spring and trigger bar and connector.
A trigger bar from a gen3 G-17 will have the smooth trigger.
I am in the same boat with Both my gen2 G-19s the connectors are fine, but the triggers are grooved.
I shoot with the pads of my fingers, and I really think it is the sharp edges of the Trigger Safety that hurts my fingers.
 

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...buy the new spring and trigger bar and connector.
... buy a new TB and a "." connector.
The post-2010 improvements are designed to reduce coil trigger spring hook failure. The current Gen3 Trigger With Trigger Bar reduces stress leading to hook failure at ONLY ONE END of the trigger spring. But...most reports indicate that the coil trigger spring hook fails more frequently at its OTHER END which is attached to the Trigger Mechanism Housing. A current TMH is required along with a current TWTB in order to get any real improvement in coil trigger spring service life.

It is foolish to replace only one of the two.
 
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I'm your huckleberry....
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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
You will make things much worse by half-a$$ing a groove or notch at the pre-2010 trigger bar's coil trigger spring attachment point. Besides, the short simple TS attachment point on a pre-2010 trigger bar doesn't even need such a thing.
First off, thanks for taking the time to write all that in way of explanation. I thought the notch in the new triggerbars was to align the spring, too, for some benefit. The smooth-trigger non-notch bar has been there for a while. Thing is, I used the NY1 spring combo so it was not an issue. Reading some of Butch's recent posts convinced me to go back to the old connector and coil spring.

When I changed the spring combinations back the other day I noticed my G19 (oldest of the Glocks) had the old style trigger bar. I figured just adding the notch and putting the originals back in would work. OK, so I was wrong.... :frown:

You've convinced me to leave it alone so I'll just put my old bar back in with the original connector and coil spring. Hey, less work for me!

Thanks to all who responded and 1) the moths are all gone from my wallet because 2) the explosives used to try to open it killed 'em and a crowbar can't match explosions - but thanks for the offer anyway!!! :D
 
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I'm your huckleberry....
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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Wow, so you’re going to use a Dremel and file on one of the main fire control parts in your handgun?
Nope, changed my mind!
 
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Get the parts needed to make the changes and be safe. Don’t alter any of the parts.
 

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IMHO, the post-2010 improvements to the Gen3 TWTB and TMH are very worthwhile to backfit into earlier pistols, since they reduce occurence of the MOST common Glock mechanical failure. I've done that for all of my pre-Gen4 Glocks. (ALL Gen4 pistols have the improved design.)

It costs only three inexpensive parts: TWTB, TMH, and trigger spring.
 

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What a terrible idea!

You will make things much worse by half-a$$ing a groove or notch at the pre-2010 trigger bar's coil trigger spring attachment point. Besides, the short simple TS attachment point on a pre-2010 trigger bar doesn't even need such a thing.

The changes made to Gen4-style trigger bars and to post-2010 Gen3 trigger bars distribute the stress across a length of the TS hook...instead of all the pressure being exerted at just one point on the hook. This improved trigger bar design has added curved metal surface on which the hook lays and a groove on that surface to help keep the hook aligned properly on the curved surface. But these changes actually make it much easier than the pre-2010 version to reassemble the pistol with the Trigger Spring hook incorrectly canted left or right, if there is inattention to detail during reassembly.

There's no grinding or cutting or filing or drilling or anything else on a pre-2010 trigger bar that will create the improvements of the new trigger bar design for reducing trigger spring hook failure. The rough and sharp edges left by an amateur rework attempt are much more likely to cause coil Trigger Spring hook early failure than had everything just been left alone.

Also, it seems historically that the trigger spring hook fails more often at the other end, where the trigger spring attaches to the polymer trigger mechanism housing. The post-2010 TMH corrects that as well by rounding the TS attachment point on the TMH.

The only wise approach to all of this is to install a current Trigger With Trigger Bar AND a current Trigger Mechanism Housing. They will have all the proper improvements. Be sure to install a new coil trigger spring as well.

One of the nice things about the Gen5/G42/G43 design is the redesigned hookless trigger spring that should almost never fail. The pre-Gen5 coil trigger spring is the part that breaks most often on a Glock pistol.
What he said.... I guess...
 
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