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Arm Strengthening

Discussion in 'Strength & Conditioning' started by Pitmaster, Mar 26, 2007.

  1. Pitmaster

    Pitmaster

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    I'm in the beginning stages of learning the sport of using a handgun. I am going to get a CCW after I take a couple of classes get enough experience handling a handgun and shooting. I'm in my mid'50's and not the strongest ox in the world. What are some exercises that I can do to strengthen my ability to hold a pistol steady? I workout fairly regularly, but feel I need to make sure I'm addressing my ability to hold a handgun steady.
     
  2. proactive

    proactive

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    IMO the principle of specificity applies here. Practicing your draw stroke and dry firing in your chosen stance (isosceles, weaver, etc) and practicing holding your correct sight picture will do wonders for increasing your ability to hold steady. This is assuming your workout routine includes some form of resistance training.
     

  3. DBradD

    DBradD

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    I agree with him.

    I'm curious about the origin of the question. Are your hands/arms/shoulders getting tired when you go to the range? Are you trying to shoot a large volume? What caliber? Is your pistol really heavy? I'm in reasonable shape and I get tired after maybe 100 rounds with my G23 because it snaps by hand back fairly hard. My accuracy is noticeably worse after maybe 75 rounds. I don't know if it pinches a nerve or just fatigues some muscle, but I'm fairly shaky if I try to shoot for accuracy much past that. My point is that you might not have a problem that requires specific exercises.
     
  4. Pitmaster

    Pitmaster

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    I haven't been to the range yet. I'm concerned about my stamina to shoot for any length of time and my strength would be a factor in the decision of which gun to buy. I'm scheduled to take a gun safety class next weekend. I have virtually no knowledge of firearms, and only the barest of basic safety information.

    I probably should have prefaced the question with a big "NOOB" Icon
     
  5. proactive

    proactive

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    Hey, everyone's a noob at some point. Thumbs up for starting out with qualified instruction. Enjoy your classes. The arm endurance will come with practice.
     
  6. Pitmaster

    Pitmaster

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    Thanks.
     
  7. DBradD

    DBradD

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    I wouldn't worry too much about stamina. I don't think shooting zillions of rounds in a session does any good for most folks anyway. Fewer, quality rounds will do you more good. That's why I only usually shoot four 3-shot groups with my precision rifle when I go to the range. I don't want to be in the habit of just "banging away."

    As for strength, if your hands and arms are very weak, then you could get a Model 19, 9mm. My Mom has very bad hands (arthritis) and she can shoot one of those.

    Hey, this is the H&F Forum. Are we allowed to type about guns?!
     
  8. mossy500camo

    mossy500camo ammo found

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    Ever tried performing 'knuckle pushups'.
     
  9. Matt VDW

    Matt VDW Millennium Member

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    It doesn't take much muscle to support a couple pounds of handgun, even when held at arm's length.

    The one area where I would focus is grip strength. Good shooting is at least 50% trigger control, and trigger control starts with establishing a solid, stable relationship between your hand and the pistol. You don't have to use a death grip, but you do need to grip firmly enough to keep the pistol from slipping in recoil.