Are all Glock parts drop in?

Discussion in 'General Glocking' started by CheerioWolf, Aug 16, 2018.

  1. CheerioWolf

    CheerioWolf

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    I'm a stickler for caring for a gun and keeping a good parts replacement schedule. Are all glock components drop in? I'd like to keep at least one of each pin/spring around at all times. That's the main reason I never bought a 1911, as they are quite finicky that way.
     
  2. Lt. Donn

    Lt. Donn PSO Survivor. currently in NW Georgia

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    I believe all OEM parts are, but some aftermarket items must be fitted
     
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  3. ScottR65

    ScottR65

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    For the most part, & you’ll need a punch or Glock operators tool to get the housing pins out, but yes. The magazine catch spring is probably the hardest one.



    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
     
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  4. Errick

    Errick NRA Patron

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    Within a model ie.G19 and a generation as 3 4 5 ECT. All stock Glock parts are drop in.
     
  5. Mountain10mm

    Mountain10mm

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    Yes, if you use OME Glock parts, but not all parts are interchangeable between models or generations.
     
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  6. CheerioWolf

    CheerioWolf

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    I see no problem using OEM parts only, but what aftermarket parts would have to be fitted? For the most part I'm thinking of just getting a ton of basic springs to keep on hand because of how cheap they are. I noticed that with the Glock operators, your pretty much set for a detail strip. This is what I love about this platform, no gunsmithing required for most work, just common sense, a good steady hand, and tools you should have no matter what, a true working mans gun.

    Also, is going with an aftermarket all steel guide rod with a heavier spring going to increase the longevity of that component?
     
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  7. DirectDrive

    DirectDrive

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    I think one of the requirements of the Austrian military (at design phase) was that all parts shall be interchangeable (within that model).

    A Bar-Sto barrel comes to mind in regards to a fitted part.
    Some Ghost connectors need to be fitted.

    The steel (or tungsten) guide rod is open to debate.
    Some target shooters say that they like the added weight.
    Some also like the non-captive style for faster spring changes.

    Common sense would dictate that a steel guide would outlast the OEM
    polymer.
    Also, you can continue to use the steel rod through many spring changes.
    The OEM polymer rod is a throw away item at spring change intervals.

    You shouldn't willy-nilly go to a heavier spring just because it seems cool.
    The Glock engineers have painstakingly selected the best spring powers for each of the models.
    You could get a rod and tuner's kit from Wolff and experiment with your pet loads.
    If you like to tinker.
     
    Last edited: Aug 16, 2018
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  8. Ofc.JL

    Ofc.JL

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    One of Glock's game changing attributes when the G17 first debuted was the fact that the pistol is what's now known as a "Bin" gun. Insomuch as all the parts are drop in bin parts w/ no hand fitting. Up until Glock's G17, handguns in general needed some form of hand fitting of several parts. That cost Labor money, and increased the price of the firearm.
    Glock blew that kind of firearms manufacturing out of the water. Police and Military Armorers loved it, as duty maintenance was now greatly simplified, and remains so today. And look around today at how many duty style handguns are now of the same ilk, in an effort to capitalize on Glock's success. Many manufactures are now building very similar pistols, w/ great results.
    So, in answering your question, yes, Glock OEM parts are drop in, per the correct model.
    As another poster said, aftermarket parts may require some hand fitting, and some aftermarket parts can cause function problems.
     
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  9. ScottR65

    ScottR65

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    Glock recommends replacing approx. every 5,000 rounds. Avoid steel/tungsten rods. Those are stiff and may short stroke an under-powered round. OEM is flexible which is one reason why Glocks will eat anything. All other springs change at 15,000. Ditto DirectDrive on this: "Common sense would dictate that a steel guide would outlast the OEM polymer." I've got 12,000 rounds through the one of my 19 Gen 4s with the steel RSA (note, Sig Sauer uses steel RSA rods). My new Gen 5 19 is stock except for Ameriglo Hackathorn sights.

    That said, I got a black steel rod when I was a newbie and I couldn’t tell that it made me a better shooter, but it looked better since it didn’t have a hole in the middle like the stock one does. Those mostly help Lenny’s bank account at the Glock Store!



    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
     
    Last edited: Aug 16, 2018
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  10. Squib77

    Squib77

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    You should take the armorers course first
     
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  11. CheerioWolf

    CheerioWolf

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    Is it open to the everyday Joe? and if so, how? I'd love to take it!

    Also I feel this is relevant, but I asked Glock VIA facebook if they intended to discontinue producing new Gen 3's/gen 3 parts, and here was their response:

    "GLOCK is not currently offering any new Gen 3 parts at this time. Any new products will be announced via our Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter accounts."

    Now I feel that my question was misinterpreted, as it sounds like their referring to brand new, never before made parts, rather than spare/replacement parts. Not long ago if I recall a rumor was spread around the internet that the Gen 3 was being discontinued, which worried me because that means spare parts might in the future become a rarity.
     
  12. vmann

    vmann Controller

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    I have at least 2 glocks that are 20+ years old that still have the factory original parts in them....
     
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