Arabic ...Rosetta stone

Discussion in 'The Okie Corral' started by rsagona1, Apr 24, 2012.

  1. rsagona1

    rsagona1 Hello

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    It's a tough job market if you want to be a LEO/ or in federal gov. I'm not having much luck. I figure I need to make myself look more appealing. Anyone try this software?

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  2. sns3guppy

    sns3guppy

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    Presumably you're in law enforcement already; if you're hoping to learn Arabic in order to get your foot in the door in the first place, you may be picking up the wrong end of the stick.

    That said, you're not going to learn Arabic, and certainly can't claim to speak Arabic, from using the Rosetta Stone products. Having used Rosetta Stone for Chinese, Spanish, German, or Arabic doesn't qualify you ask speaking those languages.

    All of the Rosetta Stone programs are the same. They use a building block program using the same base word-symbols (boy, girl, man, woman, horse, ball, airplane, over, under, etc). Learn the word listening to a voice and looking at a picture, then begin to put them into sentences.

    I have the Arabic program; I got it when I moved to Saudi Arabia. I figured that with the program and being immersed in the culture, I'd hammer it out. Didn't happen. In fact, I quickly became so disgusted with the arabs that I rebelled against the idea. That said, unless you're going total immersion in a culture, then any language training you do is superficial at best.

    I spend a great deal of time in locations where a lot of Arabic is spoken, as well as other languages (Pashto and Dari, mainly). If you can't immerse yourself in the language and the culture, then do the best you can (get movies and shows in arabic, have it in the background all the time, get used to it so it sounds natural around you. Concentrate, if you can, on Egyptian arabic, because most other locations don't speak it nearly as well; even the Saudi's will tell you that their arabic isn't nearly as good as Egyptian arabic.

    You're not going to become a useful translater and counterterrorist tool by studying arabic on Rosetta Stone. It's a good place for an introduction to the basics, but there's no substitute for interactive practice with native speakers.

    If you happen to live in a location where there's a lot of arabic spoken (Detroit, for example), you can probably find people with whom you can interact, and take actual lessons; you're far better off doing that than trying to teach yourself.

    Don't count on being able to put arabic on your resume if all you do is go through Rosetta Stone, but it's a good introduction and basic education in where to start.
     

  3. rhikdavis

    rhikdavis U.S. Veteran

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    Hang out in mosques.
     
  4. Restless28

    Restless28

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    Rosetta jumped the shark when they got rid of the hottie in the blue and red top.
     
  5. cgwahl

    cgwahl Sheriffs a near

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  6. DoubleWide

    DoubleWide

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    Do you know Spanish? Can you actually use it daily in your area?
     
  7. cgwahl

    cgwahl Sheriffs a near

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    You can practice by calling a company and hitting 2.
     
  8. rsagona1

    rsagona1 Hello

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    Wow thanks a lot for that message. Can I PM you? (once I get to an actual computer)






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  9. rsagona1

    rsagona1 Hello

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  10. rsagona1

    rsagona1 Hello

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    I'm about intermediate...a lot of people know Spanish here though--I figured learning Arabic would guarantee me a federal job since I'm having a rough time getting hired locally.


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  11. Henry's Dad

    Henry's Dad woof, woof

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    RS admits their greatest shortcoming in their ads (at least the radio ads I hear).

    They say you will learn a new language "the same way you learned your first language."

    Absolute rubbish, from both a practical and neurological perspective.

    The practical side is obvious. You learned your first language in a home where (presumably) everyone spoke that language all the time.

    Neurologically, you have an adult brain now. An adult brain has a vastly harder time learning a new language. It's simply never been an evolutionary necessity for the adult brain to easily pick up a new language.

    For infants and children, it is much easier, as the synapses are still being formed, and learning their parents' language is required for communication (ie, survival, from an evolutionary perspective).

    It is similar to why it's easier for young kids to memorize (and constantly repeat) large lists of raw data. This is why we teach them their state capitals in 4th or 5th grade. Their brains are wired for this. It's also why we don't try to teach them abstract subjects like philosophy at that age.

    If you buy RS, give it to your youngest child. It will do him/her the most good.
     
  12. ScottieG59

    ScottieG59

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    I am a federal employee. There are several factors to increase your odds in federal service. When you compete, there may be many others also trying. Language may be a factor in some positions, as is security clearance, military experience, combat time, a certification, degrees, etc.

    I started as a linguist. It may not be the best choice if you are learning. You will go against many military linguists with experience, a demonstrated skill level and some dialect training. Also, they will have the right clearances.
     
  13. fnfalman

    fnfalman Chicks Dig It

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    How hard can it be? You only need to know two sentences:

    a. Allahuh Akbar!!!

    b. Shalom Aleikem.
     
  14. Henry's Dad

    Henry's Dad woof, woof

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    A Muslim with a bad case of identity crisis? :rofl::rofl::rofl:
     
  15. Javelin

    Javelin Got Glock? Silver Member

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    I heard that the tape self destructs after 30 seconds when it's over in true Muslim fashion. :whistling:
     
  16. jtmac

    jtmac Señor Member

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    Unless we're talking about people of very advanced age, that's horse radish. Adults can learn language (and rote lists!) even better than children can.

    The key difference is that they are not as inclined to. They often have to re-learn how to get back in that mode, but they certainly can.

    Adults who learn foreign languages to fluency are rare, but when they do it they generally do it much faster than children who transition to learning that language.
     
  17. Henry's Dad

    Henry's Dad woof, woof

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    I'll meet you halfway. True, the adult brain can be re-trained to learn a new language, but as you say, it takes incredible determination and focus.

    Which is precisely why the vast majority of adults who try will fail. And why most copies of RS will sit on a shelf collecting dust.

    RS is the "diet pill" of foreign language learning. It promises amazing results with no active work on the user's part.

    To your point, most adults are not truly inclined to learn a language, especially after they realize it will require hard work. The child's brain does not calculate effort and reward the same way.

    All of which is why I still say that, in the aggregate, it is easier for a child to learn (or, if you like, to be taught) a 2nd language.
     
  18. GIockGuy24

    GIockGuy24 Bliksem

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    Not just mosques, but a lot of places have Islamic centers. Hang out in Lebanese restaurants and taverns. A lot of "Italian" restaurants and pizza places are really owned by Lebanese. Also visit the shops where they sell Middle Eastern groceries.