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April 29 hare scrambles race pics

Discussion in 'Moto Club' started by DaisyCutter, May 11, 2006.

  1. DaisyCutter

    DaisyCutter

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    These are pics of me, taken at the Camp Wood AMRA harescrambles about 2-weeks ago:

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    This was my first race of the AMRA series since I DNF'd with a front flat at the AMA National Harescrambles in February. The course was a 17 mile loop, and we had to do 3 laps. I finished in 2 hours and 35 minutes. I carried out my strategy perfectly. I held a good pace and didn't have any wrecks. I did jump into an overhead tree branch and ring my bell good, but didn't go down. That said, I got my butt handed to me. I'm relatively new to the B class, and there's a lot of really good riders that don't wanna mix it up with the expert A riders... The result is a really tough B class. I finished 12th of 14 in the 250 B, and 39th out of 66 overall in the B Class.

    There's another race this coming weekend, but I think I'm gonna wuss-out. I'm pretty dinged up from three bad left side wrecks this past month (sustained on training rides). I've got several bruised ribs on my left side and some pulled rib muscles. This is part of the reason I had to take a conservative pace at this last race.

    At any rate, I wanted to share the pics... even if I don't exhibit the form of Bubba Stewart. ;)
     
  2. DaisyCutter

    DaisyCutter

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    Here's a funny wreck compilation from one hillclimb at the race.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bt9DItbnRDw

    Note, this is a steep switchbacked hill-climb. The video DOES NOT convey how tricky this obstacle is...

    Also, the riders shown are C class riders, and most don't carry enough momentum up the hill. I was out of control each time I hit the hill. But I know takes less effort to fight the bike when it's moving forward, 50 mile races on rough terrain wear you out bad. Picking your crashed unit up wears you out even more. (Plus, if you stall in the A or B class, somebody will run over your carcass). I made damn sure I cleaned the hill each lap.


    EDIT: There's a couple muffled swear words, so drop the volume if you dislike profanity.
     

  3. fiveoboy01

    fiveoboy01

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    Is that a KX250 you're riding?
     
  4. DaisyCutter

    DaisyCutter

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    It's a 2005 KX250, I bought from Destry Abbott. It was his Vegas endurocross bike. IIRC he DNF'd that race.
     
  5. Rinspeed

    Rinspeed JAFO

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    Why does the name Denstry Abbott sound very familar. Nice pics, I can't wait to start racing.
     
  6. fnfalman

    fnfalman Chicks Dig It

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    Do they have racing schools for dirt bikes like they do with sport bikes? I know that the MSF has a one-day intro to dirt biking course. I also know that Raw Hyde is teaching adventure riding, but I don't know of any dirt riding or dirt racing school.
     
  7. DaisyCutter

    DaisyCutter

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    Destry is a Kawaski factory pro off-road rider. http://www.kawasaki.com/motorsports/green_offpro.asp?rid=190

    There are some schools you can learn at, in fact Destry offers a clinic according to his web page. http://www.destryabbott.com/ Other pros, like Jeff Fredette and Ty Davis also hold clinics, IIRC.

    Most people get a bike and then just start "riding with the guys" on our weekend rides. Off road riding is tough, and IMO experience is the primary ingredient. So I'm skeptical how much most people would take away from a 4 hour class. Usually over a couple years of weekend rides, a 100% green rider will develop into a solid amatuer racer.
     
  8. DaisyCutter

    DaisyCutter

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    Here's another video of the same hillclimb. I actually made it in this one.:supergrin:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9Jk7Pqw9zDg

    I'm shown briefly at the 3:10 minute mark (20x, green Kawasaki). I actually look better than I woulda thought. I use my 36" inseam to plant my foot past the turn and just the right amount of throttle to spin the read-end around for a straight shot up the trail.

    When I mentioned "not wanting to stall/drop the bike because you'd get flattened", I wasn't kidding. I'm buddies with a couple of the guys who are shown directly on my tail. They would've loved to have gotten an opportunity to leave some tread on me (cause I'd have done the same to them, all in fun).

    I'm guessing the camera guy used most of his battery/film on the C race, since there's so little footage of the B race, and none of the A race. The A racers would've cleared that hill standing, nary a foot on the ground, and maybe catching some air. Well, maybe not that fast, but they make the B/C riders look pretty bad.

    FYI, green or white number backgrounds mean C class, yellow is B, red is A (not shown).
     
  9. fnfalman

    fnfalman Chicks Dig It

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    Damn, that's some narly stuff!!!
     
  10. shark_za

    shark_za Woes

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    Cool stuff dude, go green!



    Me ride KLR and KDX. ;)
     
  11. Rinspeed

    Rinspeed JAFO

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    DaisyCutter

    If the weather holds out I might be entering my first hare scrambles this weekend. Any tips you can give me besides gas it would be helpful. I'm a little concerned about my endurance and arm pump can be nastly at times. Last weekend we did 30 fast miles and my right hand was getting numb at times so I am slightly worried about that as well.
     
  12. DaisyCutter

    DaisyCutter

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    Setup... A hydration pack (Camelback) should be mandatory, if not, get one anyway. Don't fill it up with tools. If you get a flat, you'll either DNF or ride it out on a flat tire. I carry a multi-tool, zip ties, and electrical tape. Any breakage exceeding the capabilities of those tools, and I'm out of contention anyway.


    Body prep strategy... Hydrate well a couple days in advance. Cytomax and Gatorade are good, but not too much. Most people drink equal amounts of water and Ctyomax prior to a race (you don't need to mix them, just drink a bottle of one followed by a bottle of the other). Eat a lot of energy food the day before and the day of the race. A couple of generic sleeping pills will help you sleep the night before (if needed). Benadryl (diphenhydramine hydrochloride) is used in sleeping pills and antihystamines and half the stuff you get over the counter, it's what makes you drowsy. I've never tried any other type

    Stay away from the Red Bull and Monster energy drinks.

    I usually eat a full meal 2-3 hours before the race. One hour before the race I eat a bananna and drink V8 juice. I find I get better initial and sustained energy with the bananna and V8, versus the Red Bull which bonks you in an hour.



    For the race strategy... ride fast, but not so fast that you burn out your arms or crash. You don't win a 3-hour race in the first turn. You're racing a clock and a course, not some idiot who's gonna pass you and bonk a few miles later. Let the faster guys by. If they truly are faster, they'll get you anyway. If they aren't, you'll see them face-down ***-up a few miles later. The majority of my passes come from wrecked or exhausted riders.

    Don't ride other racers tails, amatuers like us get squirrley trying to outrun a closing racer. When you pass, do it aggressively, and don't assume that you have to stay on the course to pass. On tight courses, against slightly slower racers of similar skill, it's hard to get by. Generally I pass by undercutting a corner by a few feet and block passing other riders (effectively running them off the road). Even if you lose speed getting bounced around a couple feet off course, get your bike in front. Then they'll have to grab brake at the same instant you open up the throttle.

    Don't pull over for a break, rest in the smooth sections or slow down if you need to. When you get tired, try riding a gear high to smooth out your bikes power delivery. Generally, when you feel yourself not getting into position quickly for obstacles, your bike will start deflecting more and it'll take more energy to keep it under control than had you just slowed down a bit before hand.

    Don't be afraid to make contact. It's gonna happen. Generally, if you panic when you make contact, you'll be less stable. IF you keep attacking and stay on the gas, you'll be far more stable. I generally bounce into a few riders each race, and I've never gone down. It's a weird thing, since nodoby ever hits each other on a weekend trail ride. Just remember, it's not a big deal.

    Also, don't second guess the course markings. It's really easy to get lost in your first race (I did). You'll start thinking, "I haven't seen an arrow marker in a while, Did I make a wrong turn?"... Odds are that you're fine.

    Take a friend. Someone that can drive you to and from the race. You don't wanna be worn out from a 200 mile drive before a race. And you will not want to drive home afterwords. Plus, having a buddy cheering you on will give you extra motivation. (It's really funny how everyone perks up when they pass the cameraman, LOL.

    After the race, you'll probably want a couple Ibuproferen.



    For future reference... 4mm thick ultra heavy duty tubes are one of the best mods you can do. With these tubes you can run 10 psi in your tires without getting flats, and the bike will hook up and turn like magic (compared to 14 psi in a regular heavy duty tube). I don't know the terrian in NY, but there's very little traction in AZ.

    For a workout plan, do some cardio and a lot of upper body workouts with high repititions. Do pushups leaning at a 45° angle so you can do double the reps.

    BTW, Rin--

    Do it! The thrill and feeling of getting out there and competing in front of the crowd and other riders is the best drug! It'll make a mortal man feel just like a pro.

    Regardless of position, just finishing a harescramble is like finishing a marathon. Every time you comtemplate quitting (I seem to every race), bear down and be confident that EVERYONE feels the same way. ;)

    Few people ever have the skill and opportunity to compete, it's a shame to let these chances get away.
     
  13. Rinspeed

    Rinspeed JAFO

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    Thank you I appreciate it lots of good advice. I am not going to race tomorrow but I am going to watch. I sprained my wrist last weekend in a fall and worried if I don't let it heal another week or two I will be sorry.

    I don't have a camel back and it is another thing I have been thinking is a must. I also don't have knee or elbow pads, what are your thoughts on their importance. Also tear-offs, will I be sorry if I don't have them. My Scott goggles are in good shape but I will be looking to get another pair in the next month or so. Have you used the roller film type goggles such as Smith. Thanks again.
     
  14. DeLandSkyjumper

    DeLandSkyjumper Play'naNewGame

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    DaisyCutter, cool pixs. Man, I miss it. Reminds me of my riding days in the Ocala National Forest. Like you stated, I started riding w/ my neighbors every Sunday and rode with them for about 4 years solid and then got my Dad into it. I started out on a KDX200 and then about 2 years later bought a used KX250. My biggest problem w/ running the enduro's was my crappy diet and lack of exercise. What usually got me were severe leg cramps/ charely horses.

    Rinspeed, one thing additional I'd add to DaisyCutter's list is to carry an additional plug or 2 if ya don't already. +1 on the Camelback and banana's as well.

    You'll want to get knee/Shin pads and a chest protector. After you thump yer knee into a tree or take a branch/limb or a rock into your upper body, you'll wish you were better protected. Also, I'm a supporter of real Bark Buster's.
     
  15. DaisyCutter

    DaisyCutter

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    Rinspeed, get the knee/elbow guards. I use cheap ones (less than $20 a set). I did have expensive knee guards, but they were too bulky. IIRC, I previously used bulky $70 Thor Force kneeguards, put now use $14 EVS Option kneeguards. I also use a chest protector. Proper gear helps you ride with confidence. If much of the course is slow and rocky, the right protective gear can help you go 20 mph instead of going 5 mph and worring about busting an elbow if you bail.

    I don't use tear-offs. In AZ, we don't have much mud, LOL. We do have dust, but tear-offs only work marginally for dust. Also, even in mud sections, an enduro isn't a motocross type race. You can pick lines and time stuff so you don't get blasted by roost.

    Figure that with 60 racers on a 10+ mile course at a time, you really don't need to be in traffic a lot. It's not like 20 riders on a 1.5 mile motocross course.

    For a long race, I will keep a spare set of goggles in a baggie in the gas pit... So I can change to a fresh pair when I pit. I've never used them though.

    IF you are racing in muddy conditions, tear-offs may be a good idea. Look at the other racers goggle set-ups to get a good idea.

    A $25 Target generic hydration pack is a godsend.

    Barkbusters are bucu good too. I make mine from carbon fiber, since I happen to have access to it. ;) Whatever you choose, just get the metal bars with something (plastic) on the leading edge.