Apples to Oranges

Discussion in 'The Okie Corral' started by rrog, Jun 6, 2007.

  1. rrog

    rrog

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    Hello hams. I'm about to buy my first radio. And if this is one of those questions where I'm asking because "I don't know what I don't know" and it's painfully obvious to everyone else, I'm sorry for the waste of time.

    I'm leaning towards a Yaesu FT-8800R. But I've heard good things about the Icom IC-V8000. I believe the Yaesu is a dual band and the Icom is only a 2m. Cost differences aside, is there any reason to NOT get the Yaesu/dual band versus the Icom? I know I'm sort of asking you to compare apples to oranges (hence the title of the thread), but it seems an obvious answer. I should go with the one that allows more coverage, right?

    My intended use is dual: home base and mobile. And I'll eventually be getting another one of the same to have one at home and the truck at the same time. While I've heard good things about the FT-8800, I've heard great things about the IC-V8000. So before I get the FT-8800, please advise me of any reasons why I should not get that and get the IC-V8000 instead.

    Thanks and 73's to ya,
    rrog
    KI4VYV
     
  2. R. Emmelman

    R. Emmelman Guest

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    By all means if you can afford it get a dual band. There is a lot of traffic on 440. Also here 146 and 440 both support SkyWarn and many 144/440 systems are crossed linked. You won't be sorry getting the 440 capability.

    Rich WI9NDY/AFA1CY
     

  3. G23Adam

    G23Adam .- -.. .- --

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    I'd go with the FT 8800 mainly for one reason, the crossband repeat, it'd make HT operations in difficult to rugged terrain much easier, plus it'd be another toy to play with :)

    My history with Vertex in the fire service has sorta jaded me on Yaesu. You do know you can pick up a Rat Shack 2 meter for $40 on fleabay ;)


    The 7800 is $100 cheaper, and is the same as the 8800 except without the crossband repeat.
     
  4. rrog

    rrog

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    To follow up, I guess I'm just trying to get confirmation that I truly understand what I'm getting and am doing it for the right reasons. I want to make sure my thought process isn't flawed. Thanks for bearing with me.

    rrog
    KI4VYV
     
  5. Warp

    Warp ΜΟΛΩΝ ΛΑΒΕ

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  6. rrog

    rrog

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    I'm working on a deal. I've got a friend who has a 3 year old 7800 he's wanting to sell. Says it's had very little use, which I believe. He's going for his general soon and says he wants to upgrade to a HF rig. He's offering the 7800, plus a power converter (cheap radio shack thing) and a mobile and home antenna, all for $300. I have a rifle I offered to trade if he would give me all his stuff, plus buy me a new IC-V8000 as well. Considering the $300 for his Yaesu, the dollar amount comes up pretty close to what I spent on the rifle. If he accepts, I'll have one for the truck and one at home, with no out-of-pocket expense.

    But like you, I'm really interested in the cross repeater thing. There was someone on e-ham.net's review page who said he has one w/o the cross band capability and he somehow configured it to basically perform the same function by relaying and/or bouncing his signals off of a satellite. I'm not sure how he did it and am probably not even describing it correctly. Any input on this capability from some elmers here would be appreciated.

    Also, is my proposed deal worth it or should I cough up the extra money and get the 8800?

    Thanks,
    rrog
    KI4VYV
     
  7. Warp

    Warp ΜΟΛΩΝ ΛΑΒΕ

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    I don't really know, but I would check on that power supply. I hear that a power supply isn't something to cheap out on. Make sure it si rated to handle the max the radio will pull (8.5amps, IIRC, for 7800 or 8800) with some room to spare....and I also read a less than great power supply can give harmfull interference
     
  8. rrog

    rrog

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    This one is a 10 amp, but maybe you're right. It's a radio shack, after all. I'll try to read up on it some more.


    Oh and I have been talking on EchoLink. On one hand, it's better than either of the two radios I'm looking at because I can talk around the world. But on the other, I can only talk to others who are using EchoLink.


    Thanks for the heads up,
    rrog
    KI4VYV
     
  9. Warp

    Warp ΜΟΛΩΝ ΛΑΒΕ

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    What happens to Echolink when your utilities go out?
     
  10. R. Emmelman

    R. Emmelman Guest

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    Go with a bigger power supply then you think you need. You may very well get into HF and you will need the extra amps. I would also suggest getting a brand name such as Astron

    http://www.astroncorp.com/sps.shtml

    I have the Astroon 30 amp supply (SS30) and it was not all that expensive ($129.95 at HRO). [​IMG]

    Rich WI9NDY / AFA1CY
     
  11. rrog

    rrog

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    I guess you're shut down, just like everyone else who isn't running a HF rig, with a back up generator. I assume all repeaters in the affected area would be down as well.

    rrog
    KI4VYV
     
  12. Warp

    Warp ΜΟΛΩΝ ΛΑΒΕ

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    You don't need a generator or HF. A battery will do. Some people set up deep cycle storage batteries...or power a mobile/base unit with a cary battery or self contained jump starter thing. Anybody with a mobile unit in their car can still use it, some repeaters have battery, gen or solar backup as well.

    Don't forget that even with UHF/VHF you do not need repeater to talk to somebody. A 35-50W mobile unit will go for many miles (don't quote me on this, but easily 10 to as many as 30 sounds about right, variables depending) in simplex (one on one with somebody else on a single frequency).

    One of the primary purposes of Ham Radio is to work in an emergency (emcomm), and working without power is a given requirement for doing so.
     
  13. rrog

    rrog

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    I know what you're saying, but I was thinking more along the lines of Katrina. Would a 10-30 mile transmission get the job done when there was power out so far inland? I guess I was also thinking more long term, in regards to needing a generator. But I'm sure there's a way around that too. As I've admitted before, I'm so new, I don't know what I dont' know.

    73's,
    rrog
    KI4VYV
     
  14. Warp

    Warp ΜΟΛΩΝ ΛΑΒΕ

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    There may be a lot of people you can talk to, and listen to, in a 30 mile radius. (not sure on accuracy of the 30 mile thing, remember, it could be further for all I know). Just what we need, a couple noobs trying to figure this out. :rofl:

    There are also nets and other interesting things out there. You do not have to personally reach out to your intended recipient, all you may have to do is generate the message and have it relayed to its destination. 25 words or less, please.