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Ballpark, what will a good Japanese kitchen knife cost? YouTube. Burrification. I follow his channel and he focuses on these type knives. I like knives and really don't get all the hoopla. Go to wal mart biuy a good knife and keep it sharpe.
 

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Anyone into Japanese knives?

I just started taking interest in higher end kitchen knives.

I got a shun hiro bread knife when it went on sale and also a miyabi fusion chefs knife. (Not my pics but these are the knives I have)
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I really wish I had sprung for the miyabi Birchwood or black. The Birchwood model is gorgeous, but the black has slightly better steel and a burl handle.

Shun and miyabi are probably the most well known Japanese knives in America. And I really like the lifetime warantees.

But I'm kind of wanting to venture into buying something from a smaller shop. Have something that there aren't a million of.

I'm really liking Yu Kurosaki.

I'm wanting a petty next and will likely go with them if I can ever find one in stock that I want.

As far as steel goes, seems like zdp-189 and hap 40 are some of the best. But it seems hard to find many options with those steels.

I'm thinking about going with a blue super steel with a kurouchi finish.

Anyone have a prefered seller? So far I have just bought from cutlery and more and they have been excellent. Got the knife the same week I ordered both times with basic shipping.

Here are some of the yu kurosaki knives I like...

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I’m one of the guys who doesn’t understand the difference between $20 knives and $200 knives. I buy Jap knives, but they’re the $20 ones at the Jap grocery store. They work fine.

Is it just aesthetics, or is there a practical benefit to the high-end knives?
 

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Ballpark, what will a good Japanese kitchen knife cost? YouTube. Burrification. I follow his channel and he focuses on these type knives. I like knives and really don't get all the hoopla. Go to wal mart biuy a good knife and keep it sharp.
As a general rule, most WalMart knives will be Chinese. Apart from the fact that I am trying very hard to no longer buy anything Chinese, the difference in quality is substantial.
I follow Burrfection on YT also, and while he has shown some comparisons of inexpensive knives, some of which he approves of, he doesn't use WalMart knives.
To your question of how much to spend? most of my decent knives seem to have run between $70 to $120. However I just spent $250 on a cleaver, which was a present for my sister. Ironically, it is a Chinese traditional design.

I have been buying from hocho-knives.com. They are a distributer, not a manufacturer.

Until recently, I had been buying German (Wusthof, Henckels), but have transitioned to Japanese. Interestingly, you can buy German steel in Japanese designs (eg Santoku) and you can buy traditional Western chef knives from Japanese makers.
 
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My general use kitchen knives are all Japanese style Santokus.

My problem with a lot of Japanese knives is their blade stock is way too thick. My favorite kitchen knife is a Spyderco Santoku that was made in Japan for Spyderco. It’s very thin and easy to keep sharp.

I also really like Victorinox kitchen knives, and they are the best bang for the buck IMO. My traditional chef’s style knives are Victorinox.

I like thin knives that are softer steel so it’s doesn’t take diamond stones to sharpen them and I can maintain them on a steel for a long time in between sharpenings.
 

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I’m one of the guys who doesn’t understand the difference between $20 knives and $200 knives. I buy Jap knives, but they’re the $20 ones at the Jap grocery store. They work fine.

Is it just aesthetics, or is there a practical benefit to the high-end knives?
Decently useable knives start at the $20 price point, but to me, a lot of the difference in quality above that is difficult to define. I remember a Supreme Court judge talk about pornography. Something to the effect of "I can't define it, but I recognize it when I see it".
Aesthetics is definitely a factor though. Name recognition is another.
To me I would rather spend some extra money and get something handmade.
 
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My general use kitchen knives are all Japanese style Santokus.
My problem with a lot of Japanese knives is their blade stock is way too thick. My favorite kitchen knife is a Spyderco Santoku that was made in Japan for Spyderco. It’s very thin and easy to keep sharp.
I also really like Victorinox kitchen knives, and they are the best bang for the buck IMO. My traditional chef’s style knives are Victorinox.
I like thin knives that are softer steel so it’s doesn’t take diamond stones to sharpen them and I can maintain them on a steel for a long time in between sharpenings.
Victorinox knives are very functional.
I have to disagree regarding blade thickness, though. All my Japanese knives are substantially thinner in blade thickness than my European ones.
 
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Victorinox knives are very functional.
I have to disagree regarding blade thickness, though. All my Japanese knives are substantially thinner in blade thickness than my European ones.
I like Japanese knives because there is no tang. Euro knives have a tang where once you have sharpened the blade too many times, the tang starts sticking out proud and you can’t use the knife to chop with.

I’ve never figured out how to get around this.
 

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I’m one of the guys who doesn’t understand the difference between $20 knives and $200 knives. I buy Jap knives, but they’re the $20 ones at the Jap grocery store. They work fine.

Is it just aesthetics, or is there a practical benefit to the high-end knives?




If you don't know and can't tell the difference then keep using cheap knives. Not everyone has an eye for quality, if you're not doing a lot of cooking, and a certain kind of cooking, it may not matter at all what you're cutting with.
 

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My problem with a lot of Japanese knives is their blade stock is way too thick.


No idea what Japanese knives you've been using, looking at, but the vast majority of them have much thinner blade profiles compared to most other knives. :dunno:
 

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My wife uses the standard, cut your balls off "Korean Butcher Knife", with the wooden handle found in most Asian markets for around $4.99 ea.
Its all she knows, from "Kimchi cutting" to "where were you last night", she handles it well.
 

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Many years ago my Japanese sister-in-law gifted a MAC knife to Mrs. Leaky. Very light, thin blade and it held an edge seemingly forever. Since then we've accumulated five more in various sizes from estate sales and they make up our basic prep knife kit. Not really fancy at all but great workhorses.
 
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Victorinox knives are very functional.
I have to disagree regarding blade thickness, though. All my Japanese knives are substantially thinner in blade thickness than my European ones.
A lot of the high end Japanese knives I have considered getting had very thick blade stock, like nearly 1/4” at the spine. Which is fine if the blade tapers properly to a thin edge. However, over time the edge will become thicker and thicker as you sharpen.

And thinning the blade profile is A LOT of work. Granted that’s 5 years down the road after a significant amount of use and sharpening, but it something I consider. I had a very expensive Furi Santoku style knife that had a very thick blade stock and a very hard blade steel which meant I had to use to diamond to resharpen it and it eventually got too thick to keep a razor sharp edge on it.

I wound up buying a new Victorinox because I just can’t trust my wife to properly care for a $250+ kitchen knife. I’m afraid I’d come home and find it in the dishwasher.
 

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I have had a Kasumi Damascus kitchen knife for several years. I've had Henkels and Victorinox in the past and like the Japanese knives better.
 

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Discussion Starter #37
Ballpark, what will a good Japanese kitchen knife cost? YouTube. Burrification. I follow his channel and he focuses on these type knives. I like knives and really don't get all the hoopla. Go to wal mart biuy a good knife and keep it sharpe.
I'd say $100 to $200. They can go way on up though. Just use one of the links posted and look up shun or miyabi as reference points.
 

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Discussion Starter #38
I’m one of the guys who doesn’t understand the difference between $20 knives and $200 knives. I buy Jap knives, but they’re the $20 ones at the Jap grocery store. They work fine.

Is it just aesthetics, or is there a practical benefit to the high-end knives?
Aesthetics often play a part, but much higher quality steel is used than in a $20 knife.

Depending on the steel, they can be much harder, and keep an edge much longer.

In the case of shun or miyabi, they also have lifetime warranties.
 

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Ballpark, what will a good Japanese kitchen knife cost? YouTube. Burrification. I follow his channel and he focuses on these type knives. I like knives and really don't get all the hoopla. Go to wal mart biuy a good knife and keep it sharpe.
A real, made in Japan, 8" chef's knife is about $90 on Amazon. Global brand. However, I think the traditional 8" is too long for most folks. I recommend a 7" chef's knife.
 
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