Anyone in sales?

Discussion in 'The Okie Corral' started by jp3975, Feb 10, 2010.

  1. jp3975

    jp3975

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    I just got a job with ADT that pays based on commission only. Minimum $250 per sale.

    They're supposed to give me leads and I'll likely put an ad in the papers. I may even head to the rich and bad parts of town and put out flyers.

    Any advice as to how to increase sales?

    Any other sales advice would be appreciated as I have zero experiance in sales.
     
  2. u4ea

    u4ea

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    Commission job + no experience = I hope this is not your only source of income. It's hard out there man. My best advice is to just work harder than the next guy, and that includes weekends when the real workers come out. You'll do fine, but it's always hard at first.
     

  3. Z71bill

    Z71bill

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  4. a_tack

    a_tack

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    Think of the way you feel about commissioned salesmen. Think of everything a commissioned salesman has EVER done to piss you off... Avoid doing those things. Talk to people, dont just try to sell them stuff. Get to know them, be friendly. You catch more flies with honey than vinegar. Ive been in commissioned sales for a little over two years now. Also, don't take it personal when a complete ******* blames you for every problem they or their product have...
     
  5. TexanRon

    TexanRon Come 'n Take It

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    People buy from people they like.
    The more calls you make the more you will sell.
    Listen to what the customer tells you.
    People buy from people they like.
     
  6. rahrah12

    rahrah12

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    Find out who had your territory before you and see what clients he had...
     
  7. mailman994

    mailman994 NRA Member

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    Don't be like the guy who tried to sale me ADT. My $250 system was going to end up about $4000 by the time everything was "included".

    Good luck
     
  8. DWARREN123

    DWARREN123 Grumpy Old Guy

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    Know your product and types of payment plans. Have some info on how it has helped others. Have lists of how many others in area have/use your service.
    If you can not answer questions about the product then why should they buy from you?
    Go where the product is needed and can be afforded.
    You may only get one sale for ever 10 to 15 interviews so make sure to put in the work to get the sale.
     
  9. den888

    den888

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    Be neatly groomed and polite. Learn how to "close" and ask for the order. Gauge body language properly and act on it. Make sure your sales funnel is always "full" (lots of leads). Learn how to handle the most common sales objections. Know your competition and how they position their product/service and learn how to sell against it.

    Good luck.
     
  10. paul2241

    paul2241

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    It's all a numbers game my friend. Make as many calls as you can, it will get tiring, but eventually someone will bite. When you're making appointments, don't ask when a good time will be for them, say "I'll be in your area on (day) at about (time) would you mind if I stopped by around then? Don't be afraid to be assertive, and be sure to make rapport building conversation completely unrelated to what you're trying to sell, then once everyone is comfortable, just ask for the sale, if they say no, ask them what is holding them up, and come up with another offer. If you haven't tried to close the sale at least three times, then you didn't do your job in my eyes. Always think that you'll never see the prospective client again, and always try to close the sale the first time you're in front of them. While you may hear from them again, chances are once you part ways without selling them, you'll probably never hear from them again. These are the rules I've lived by, and I've sold everything with the exception of houses, and have made a pretty decent life for myself thus far. Good luck, I'm sure you'll do fine. GET STRONG BUDDY!
     
  11. hpracing007

    hpracing007

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    I wonder what the turnover is like for a sales job like that. Door to door takes a lot of skills.

    I'm in sales myself, it has it's ups and downs.
     
  12. winglock

    winglock

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    This. additionally don't bad mouth your competition but know what makes yours better. Very important, as much or more than anything else, listen! Your customers will help you close if you let them.
    As Zig says, "You can get everything in life you want if you will just help enough other people get what they want.
     
  13. eXistenZ

    eXistenZ Play it.

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    I've been in sales since I was a child, best and easiest advice I can give has already been paraphrased:

    If people like you they'll trust you, if people trust you they'll buy from you.


    Go pick up a sales book from a good reputable salesman and read it, something small. Maybe a small Zig Ziglar book or something. I have a library of sales books but start small with something easy to read.

    Also like has already been stated, it's a numbers game. More people you get in front of the more people will say yes. Get used to rejection and for God's sake don't take it personal, people are just conditioned to say no.

    Also, REFERRALS ARE GOLD!!! If you go to a neighborhood to install a system ask the homeowner about his neighbors and ask him to introduce you to them or at least let you use him as a reference when you talk to his neighbors. Cold calling is the consequence of not getting enough referrals.

    Any questions feel free to ask.
     
  14. Norrin Radd

    Norrin Radd

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    Know your product, know your competitors product and pricing. Know what the advantages are of your product over your competitors. The general rule for sales is that for every 10 people you call on three will set an appointment and one will buy. Remember that every no, get you closer to a yes. Buy sales motivational books.
     
  15. armorplated

    armorplated

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    Know your product intimately. Practice your sales pitch on family and friends just so you get comfortable with it.

    After that it's a numbers game. If it takes you 100 contacts to get a sale, and you need 4 sales a week to live, then you need to make 400 contacts a week, or whatever your number would be.

    The thing about sales is you're always prospecting. Carry business cards. Learn to be outgoing and then just sell yourself. It's a 24/7 thing, especially in a recessionary economy.
     
  16. eXistenZ

    eXistenZ Play it.

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    Be careful about "product knowledge". Many sales people hide behind it because they think (and they may be right) they're product is better and the customer will be wooed with logic, statistics and flashy brochures. It doesn't work that way. Learn the sales steps first and foremost, product knowledge will come later. You can always look up a product question a customer may have.
     
  17. devildog2067

    devildog2067

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    A good one to start with is "How to become a Rainmaker" JJ Fox

    it's a bit simple, but it will get you started with good habits, which are CRITICALLY IMPORTANT!

    I absolutely agree. I was a terrible salesperson until I learned to stop talking about the product and start asking questions.

    The only other advice I'd throw in is that the most successful salespeople talk a surprisingly small amount. Listen more than you talk.
     
  18. eXistenZ

    eXistenZ Play it.

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    You know, I forgot a HUGE piece when it comes to sales. Half of something is better than all of nothing. Don't be afraid to get help on deals even if it cost you part of your commission. I've seen it so many times, new people get greedy, can't close the deal and won't ask for help because they don't want to give up half their commission. So instead, they can't close the sale and they get nothing.
     
  19. shavedape

    shavedape

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    Existenz, I agree with you completely except on this point. How can one sell something that one has no knowledge of? "Features and benefits" i.e. product knowledge is part of the sale--a big part. I've hawked all sorts of things for years and educating the customer always came first. If I'm the customer and you're the salesman I expect you to be able to edify me and answer every question I have about the product or service--and I'll have alot of questions. Money is tight these days and I want you to put me at ease, that's your job and product knowledge is a HUGE part of that. The last thing I want is to be in the middle of a sales pitch for a security system for my home only to have you pause and "look up" the answer to a product question I have. Total turn off and does little to make me comfortable with the deal. After all, if you can't deal with answering questions about the product what kind of response will I get from the company when I have a problem with the product or service in the future?

    I was a sales manager for years and had to train countless people. We used all sorts of sales tactics and methods but the core of the pitch was always product knowledge. I'd say this guy needs to learn about his product first and the sales part will come with it. That's the key. ;)
     
  20. eXistenZ

    eXistenZ Play it.

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    While you "hawked all sorts of things" as you put it, I built relationships. Put me in ANY sales position with a basic concept of the product and I'll sell the **** out it.

    If I may be so bold, your "problem" (no offense intended) as a salesperson would be you seem technical, so you thereby expect everyone else to be that way. Truth be told, 5-10% of buyers are technical and want to know ever answer and how something works forwards and backwards. The other HUGE majority buy upon emotion and how you make them feel. I could sell the hell out of alarm systems by getting people to visualize their safety and the protection of their loved ones and with a VERY basic understanding of the system and pricing I would sign them up.

    You are right to an extent, until I'm fully up to speed on the product I will lose 5-10% of my sales because I needed to look up an answer. I can live with that as a starting out salesperson. Or, better yet I bring help and close the deal. People respect someone who doesn't try to BS them an says "I don't know the answer, but I'd be happy to find that out if its important to you."

    And as far as the last part, the "sales part" will NOT just come with it. Any sales manager worth his salt knows that. I have gone through sales training with Fortune 100 and Fortune 500 companies and they ALL downplay product knowledge, learn your scripts and the process. The product knowledge really will come later. I seriously can't believe you advocate "sales part will come with it".