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Anyone here use Dutch Ovens?

Discussion in 'Hunting, Fishing & Camping' started by Sixgun_Symphony, Jun 7, 2003.

  1. Sixgun_Symphony

    Sixgun_Symphony NRA4EVR

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    I got a new 10" Dutch Oven last Christmas and I just seasoned it last weekend. I gave it three coats of seasoning before I used it to bake some biscuits for a bbq with my brother.

    Next time it will be some sourdough dinner rolls for a company picnic. I will be grilling meats and vegetables as well, so it should be fun.

    Anyway, I am curious as to how many others here use the camp ovens.


    The International Dutch Oven Society
     
  2. WFR

    WFR

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    Notyet!
    I am learning to properly use my growing collection of Griswold cast iron skillets though.
    They're great for alot of stuff and good in the oven as well.
    Thanks for the link. I need a Griswold dutch oven too!
     

  3. Pistol Packin' Pete

    Pistol Packin' Pete

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    They are the greatest camp cooking implement ever devised (as long as you don't have to carry it). Stew, chili, pizza, cobbler, roast, breakfasts, etc.
     
  4. Sgt

    Sgt

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    The night of Deer Hunting opener always ends with Venison Backstrap roast with carrots and potatoes. Then "Mountain Man Breakfast" the next morning to get the new days hunt off to a good start.

    Add a couple cups of cowboy coffee and you are good to go!!
     
  5. vafish

    vafish

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    I use mine all the time. I have one cast Iron and one Bedourie spun steel.

    If you want a lighter more robust (won't crack when you drop it) alternative look for a Bedourie Oven. I haven't found any here in the states, I picked mine up when I was in Australia, but they work great.

    http://www.southern-metal-spinners.com.au/camping-page.html

    Just went out with our camping club this weekend and did a 8lb pot roast in the Bedourie, Seasoned it with a bit of Emerils Escense and about a cup of red wine to keep it moiste. Took about 3 hours, but it was fantastic.
     
  6. hcook

    hcook

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    I've not done it myself, but I've got an uncle who is an absolute wizard when it comes to dutch oven cooking.
    He makes bread of all kinds, cinnamon rolls, cakes, soups, roasts, etc, etc. It's all heavenly... ;+
     
  7. XD9SW99

    XD9SW99 OOoooo Allah

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    I'll be breaking my oven in this summer. It's been seasoned (it's a new-to-me been used before) oven. Been cooking with them at home for a long time though...my mom always had a big 12 inch dutch oven. My favorite dish is chicken with mushroom rice (chicken cooked in rice with cream o mushroom soup)

    VERY yummy.

    I read an article in Field and Stream a while back about a guide here in Oregon over in the John Day River who has a 50 gallon drum in his boat that's filled with sand and coals, and cooks heavenly meals in a pair of dutch ovens for his clients. Makes one salivate heavily when reading that article...

    Last year I used a steel skillet with teflon coating that I picked up at Goodwill for camp-cooking duties. It was magical really...nothing ever stuck to it. Pancakes, eggs, steaks...nothing stuck. I used it camping. I used it at home. Then one day at home, I was in the bedroom cleaning, my wife was doing dishes. I heard something fall and break. Then an expletive. Then I hear a loud thud in the kitchen. I rush out to see if she's ok. She'd accidentally dropped a plate and it shattered. Then in anger and frustration (that was the third broken plate that week) she took that skillet, my favorite cooking utensil, and thrown it at the floor. When I picked it up, it was severely bent, and forever unusable. I've not found one to replace it since. *sigh*

    The good ol' days...
     
  8. Garfield_1969

    Garfield_1969

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    Hi,

    I am Dutch and even live in the Netherlands, but ... what is a Dutch Oven ?
     
  9. hcook

    hcook

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    Dutch Ovens are heavy duty, covered cooking vessels and are usually made of cast iron. They are used over campfires or a bed of charcoal.

    You might want to check out the International Dutch Oven Society for more information.
     
  10. AAshooter

    AAshooter

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    Here is a picture of a few . . .
     
  11. valleyz

    valleyz Problem Child

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    My favorite dish for a Dutch Oven is(flame away),Baked beans and ground beef;P I take a couple of cans of Bush's(original) baked beans and add syrup,brown sugar,onions,bell peppers,a little BBQ sauce and browned ground beef.I usually cook this on a tripod over an open fire.YUMMY
    I do remember reading on a Dutch oven website to take whatever you cook out of the Dutch oven after you finish cooking to avoid the "iron" taste.
     
  12. Craigster

    Craigster

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    I have been camp cooking with Dutch ovens for many years. Having four, three Lodge and one aluminum (cant remember the brand) 10" to 16". There are several cookbooks available with basic information about the theory of Dutch oven cooking. The one I use most is unavailable and I can’t remember the author but here are a few of my own offerings.

    For all most all oven cooking, especially bread type such as biscuits, cakes, cobblers and also omelets and Lasagna, the majority of the cooking is done from the top. My formula is; Take the size of your oven, I will use 16”, divide in half (8) and that is the number of hot charcoals to place underneath. Now divide in half and add that to the size (24) coals to put on top. With the coals on top, set the oven on top of the (8) coals for 1/3rd of the cooking time then move the oven off of them and continue cooking for the balance of the time using only the coals on top to maintain temp, adding more if needed. The fewer times you remove the top the better. This will produce a 350/375-degree oven.

    Cooking “in the fire” can be tricky and can result in a burned meal and an oven that needs extreme cleaning. I have used the fire to jump start and then go to charcoal for cooking and I have used fire coals often but again they can be tough to keep at the right temp and depend on the type of wood used for the fire. Get a tri-pod for fire cooking beans and soups it also works great for cooking over the wood stove at Elk camp. Hint; attach the chain permanently so it can’t get lost.

    Get a short handled clam shovel or ditch spade to move coals around. The longer and narrower the blade the better.

    Start coals in the fire. Its fast and your camp doesn’t have to smell that starting fluid.

    Pliers work OK for lid removal but the lid tool by Lodge is the best Iv used. No moving parts.

    Stacking ovens is impressive and lots of fun but experience is very helpful.

    I have always served directly from the oven and never noticed an "iron taste". The cast keeps the food hot even when back for seconds or thirds. If you are tasting somthing funny it sounds like the oven isnt seasoned properly.

    Most important on this list………NEVER NEVER NEVER let anyone clean your oven with soap and water, a SOS pad or worst of all the dishwasher. Maybe in a cold creek with light sand rub in a pinch but again never soap and water. Once on a camp out my mother in law, God love her, decided to clean all my cast while I was on an adventure and I didn’t discover it until that evening while preparing a dinner for thirty. Eventually everything came out OK and she had great intentions but I was not a happy camper.

    Cleaning…. What I have done for years is after the meal is over or even the next day is to put the oven in the fire or on the coals empty and without the lid until it JUST starts to burn what is left in the bottom, but not to hot it’s a feel thing. Leave on the heat and throw in enough ice cubes (they should bubble and steam when they hit) so when they melt will cover the bottom with about ½ inch of water. While they are melting use the spatula to clean up the inside. Dump and rinse with water then dry with a paper towel. Use another towel and a little cooking oil to lightly coat the inside and bottom of the lid while still warm. Store with the lid on. This procedure produces a clean oven in less time than it takes to throw another log on the fire. If your oven gets gunkie while stored over a long period a little vinegar rub will shape it up.

    Practice at home.

    When cooking Dutch, the easy way is always the best way. Dump cooking (open a can or package and dump it in) is good, easy and leaves time for visiting.

    Favorite recipes:
    Last day “Left over” omelets.
    Chicken potpie.
    Sheepherder pie.
    Chocolate fudge cake.
    Peach Cobbler. Requires homemade ice cream. The kids love to crank for a lick off of the paddles.
    Apple Pie. Ice cream optional.
    Prime Rib.
    Biscuits and gravy.
    Elk chili and corn bread.
    Clam chowder
    Lasagna

    Somthing else thats a ton of fun is ground oven cooking. A pit the size of an ice chest lined with rock 9AM build a fire, throw in the food wrapped with HD tin foil (seven wraps) over the bed of super hot coals, hot rocks on top, foil over them and bury with dirt. Dig up at 5PM. Easy, lots of fun, never had a failure and the food is unbelievable. Turkey, BBQ beef ribs and beef or pork roasts (everything gets wine) are some we have done and always came out great. Campers love to get involved.

    I have rambled to long.