Anyone do military and LEO?

Discussion in 'Cop Talk' started by matt86, Feb 7, 2010.

  1. matt86

    matt86 Oink Oink

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    Right out of college I went straight to work for a police department and was hired my first try as an LEO. I was sworn just after my 21st birthday and have been a sworn officer for a little over two years. While in college I wanted to go into the military (marine corps) but never did because of my girlfriend at the time. We are still together but it has turned kinda rocky and I've regretted not going. Has anyone joined the Marine corps reserve or anything after being a sworn officer? I know theres a good chance of me being deployed if I did and I would lose my certification as an LEO if I was gone for a year (which is very likely) and this is what has really what is discouraging me. Anyone have any input?
     
  2. polizei1

    polizei1 It WAS Quack

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    We have an LEO at my unit, and a few corrections and whatnot. A typical deployment is 6-7 months, the Marine Corps usually NEVER goes a year. However, sometimes there WILL be back-to-back deployment, and if that happens yes, it could be over a year. I don't think that's very common though.

    Personally, if you want to do it, go for it. It's YOUR decision, not going because of your girlfriend is dumb. I'll just give you a heads up though, reserves aren't very fun...I'm trying to finish school to become an LEO, I'm already military police. It's entirely different.

    And deployment isn't always like everyone thinks it is. Every unit, both active and reserve, are on unit rotation, so it really depends on your unit. Now, going reserve...you'll be gone for ~8 months if you go pipeline (straight through). And thats IF you complete all the training on time, if you get injured, well it could be a year or more easily. If you're in college you can do a 92 day reservist program, which is basically boot one year, MCT the next, and MOS school the next.

    What MOS are you looking at? Also, keep in mind what units are near you. Not all MOS' are going to be near you. There's some guys at my unit that drive 4+ hours.

    Anymore questions feel free to ask.

    -Cody
     

  3. blueiron

    blueiron

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    We had some people go Guard and Reserve after being on the job. It was a mixed bag, depending on the person's experiences.

    One friend of mine left his active MC commission and went Reserve as a Captain. He was recalled to Active and is now a LTC in Germany sitting on the Fulda Gap. He got hired in 2002 and has now more recall time in the Corps, than as an active cop. Needless to say, the city is not pleased. Still, he keeps his certification because he is still employed - he merely has to go through legal updates and advanced officer training for the things that he has missed.

    When he returns, he will be a street cop with a BS from the USNA, a MS, a Doctoral candidate, and a USMC LTC battalion commander. Will he be happy listening to civil disputes and taking burglary reports? I doubt it.

    If you go USMC officer, expect to get recalled.

    I still miss being an active Marine. I don't miss being a cop/fed.
     
  4. Hack

    Hack Crazy CO Gold Member

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    In some federal agencies you are allowed to go National Guard or Reserves. But, in some others if you become employed in certain federal agencies, you are forced to by law to give up the reserves.
     
  5. matt86

    matt86 Oink Oink

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    Thanks for the info. I doubt it will work out. I love my career in law enforcement and don't want to give it up or have it harmed as a result so I doubt I would be able to do it quite honestly.
     
  6. Hack

    Hack Crazy CO Gold Member

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    Check it out with your department. If you have a large enough department, they should be able to afford to spare you, and keep a position for you. It is against the law for most places to not keep a place for you.
     
  7. CJStudent

    CJStudent No Longer Fenced In

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    I'm in the National Guard (just got home from drill, actually), and a corrections officer as well. By law, when gone on military duty, voluntary or involuntary, your department MUST maintain your position for you, with any seniority you would have gained had you been there. I'm not 100% on it, but I'm fairly certain there are ways for you to maintain your commission while on military duty, including long-term deployments. Check with POST or the equivilent in your state.

    I will say that it is definitely different going through basic later in life instead of right out of high school. Expect to go through with a bunch of just-out-of-high-school punks and some people in their late 30's or early 40's. I will also say that, to me, going through with the "cop" mentality ingrained is a whole lot harder, as you pretty much have to lose that "type-a personality" for a while. At least that's my experience going the Army route; YMMV.
     
  8. Hack

    Hack Crazy CO Gold Member

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    When I first went in, we had several who were older in my platoon. Some in their mid thirties, others who had seen time in Vietnam. The one or two who were in Vietnam did so for their own reasons. I believe it was because they could not handle it on the outside.
     
  9. polizei1

    polizei1 It WAS Quack

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    A really good point CJStudent brought up. Life is completely different, and your mindset is not the same. Honestly, I've wanted to be an LEO for 8 years now (currently 20), and while I do think military experience would help, and give you a different perspective, I would count your blessings and move on. Unless you REALLY want to do it. I know a huge part for me was challenging myself and I wanted to ALWAYS have the title of a Marine.

    In the end, it's really your decision...and only you can decide. Seriously, I try and tell everyone who is thinking about joining, please do not let another person decide for you. If they love you, they will go with you or wait. If not, then it's not meant to be.

    But as far as the job goes, any employer, by federal law, has to hold your position/seniority for I believe (at least in my case) 4 years. I would contact your chief and get more information.

    Best of luck!

    -Cody
     
  10. CW Mock

    CW Mock

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    The Marine Corps is probably one of the things I wish I could have done in life but didn't. Not so much that I regret it every day or anything, but still something I wish I could of done. I don't think that the USMC Reserves are a realistic option for me now, given a family has come along.

    So, from that perspective, if it is something you have always wanted, and you don't have obligations like 2 kids, then do it. Do it, and you will never have to ask "what if."

    I do, and I regret it.
     
  11. KaosV

    KaosV

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    I think blueiron in right about them having to hold your position open.
     
  12. lawman800

    lawman800 Juris Glocktor

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    It just keeps getting better, don't it?
    If you have the time to read it, google USERRA which is the Law that governs employees who get called to serve. You will get your time off for military duty and some pay as well and depending on your employer, you can get full pay from them and the military.

    I'm not the one that handles it where I work but I have signed off on a few of these things so I know the federal law protections.
     
  13. blueiron

    blueiron

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    If you want to be commissioned as a Marine Officer, you better get moving. The Officer candidate program has strict age and other restrictions.

    Call or visit a local recruiter and ask to speak to an Officer program recruiter. It takes a while to get into it and you must meet physical conditioning requirements prior to your ship date.

    Remember that the Marines are very selective about Officers. A bachelor's degree is not the only thing they are looking for. Basic Officer School is six long months of tough and demanding training. The wash out rate is significant and they will drop those not mentally or physically capable of leadership. A friend who went through enlisted boot at Parris Island and later went to Basic Officer at Quantico said that the Officer course was more demanding all the way around.

    Good luck!
     
  14. lawman800

    lawman800 Juris Glocktor

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    It just keeps getting better, don't it?
    You are always a Marine first, an officer second, a lawyer third. (As told to me by the Marine JAG recruiter)