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Anyone a pilot?

Discussion in 'Survival/Preparedness Forum' started by emt1581, Feb 12, 2012.

  1. emt1581

    emt1581 Curious Member

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    For the past few years I've gained interest in getting my pilot's license. Today I ran into my motorcycle course instructor who's also got his pilot's license and he was talking to me about getting started.

    Seems like it'd take between 50-100 hours of air time (thought most I'd read online say it's a few hundred to a few thousand hours). It'd also cost around $8K for everything. But he said once you have it you are good to go. Then it's just $100/hr to rent the planes locally or wherever.

    In regard to S&P I'm just thinking that'd be a nice skill to have. Not only would you have the slim chance of being able to fly to wherever you wanted any time you wanted but in a TEOTWAWKI if you came upon a plan you'd be able to fly it. Now I'm sure there are codes and keys specific to each aircraft...but still I can think of many SHTF's that being a pilot would come in handy for.

    So is anyone licensed as a pilot? What are your thoughts on the issue?

    Thanks

    -Emt1581
     
  2. IrishSheepdog54

    IrishSheepdog54

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    I have about 5000 hours or so (haven't updated my logbook in a long time), and used to be a captain for a regional airline. I've flown a bunch of stuff, including helicopters and gliders. Honestly, it's a good skill to have, but it's not like in the movies where you can jump into a plane and know how to operate it with ease.

    I haven't flown a single engine prop in 8 or 9 years. I could probably figure it out in a few minutes if the SHTF, but I think my firearms skills are more helpful.

    Flying is an outstanding hobby though! I can't wait until I have disposable income and can afford to rent a plane again. Too many expenses and debt right now to do it.
     

  3. emt1581

    emt1581 Curious Member

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    Right I figured as much about hoping in and flying any plane off. But initially, after seeing the prices on ebay and such, I figured buying one wasn't bad. However, the UPKEEP would be the issue and easily more expensive than the initial cost of a used one within a few years.

    But how awesome would that be....with enough property...to have your own plane and be able to fly wherever whenever!! If it weren't for the maintenance costs I'd start saving for one. Even if not buying it, being able to rent it for the week/end and go wherever in a few hours..again...pure awesomeness.

    -Emt1581
     
  4. cowboy1964

    cowboy1964

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    It's one expensive hobby, no doubt. I wouldn't do it just because you think it might be a nice survival skill to have. I always had a life-long dream to do it.

    I've been out of it for years but have been considering getting back into it in some way as I get more disposable income. I've always wanted to get into sailplanes (though Ohio ain't exactly great sailplaning territory) or maybe gyros.

    If you did have your own plane though it does provide a great and unique bug out option, depending on the circumstances.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Feb 12, 2012
  5. Dalton Wayne

    Dalton Wayne Epic mustache Millennium Member

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    Unless you plan on flying a lot It's not worth it Will be dangerous

    Sent from my SPH-M820-BST using Tapatalk
     
  6. emt1581

    emt1581 Curious Member

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    Interesting looking vehicle...I'm guessing that's either a sailplane or gyro... :dunno:

    Never heard of either.

    Learning to fly helicopters and learning to fly planes are two totally different licenses though...no?

    In any case, unless there is something that needs close to zero monthly maintenance I wouldn't want to buy one.

    Thanks for the pic!!

    -Emt1581
     
  7. MadMonkey

    MadMonkey Spershul Furces

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    Looking forward to getting my license when I return to the States... finally have a job where I can afford it!
     
  8. emt1581

    emt1581 Curious Member

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    Anyone know of any websites that will show me the things I'd need to know/memorize/learn for getting my license (single prop fixed wing)?

    If it's tons of logarithms and theories I'm not sure I'd do well but if it's equations and knowing lots of limits/standards...that wouldn't be to bad.

    Thanks

    -Emt1581
     
  9. firefighter4215

    firefighter4215

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    It's a very expensive hobby, but can be a lot of fun. If you are a fair weather pilot the danger factor is reduced. The key to making it as safe as possible is to pay attention to everything. Don't get tunnel vision. It can be as challenging as you want it to be as well. Flying on a calm, cloudless day with great visibility isn't nearly as challenging as when the crosswind kicks up to 25-30 knots in weather. It can be whatever you want to make of it, if that makes sense. Have fun!

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  10. firefighter4215

    firefighter4215

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    No complex math is involved for flying. There is a lot of memorization of limitations, regulations, and practical test standards, as well as basic maneuvers and emergency procedures. If you can consistently fly twice a week, you should be able to get your private license in 50-60 hours. If you exceed 60 that doesn't mean you're a failure, though. 40 flight hours is the bare minimum.

    As for websites, you can go to the FAA website to find the practical test standards. Google "Pilot's Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge." I think it's published by the FAA. Also get or read online if possible a current version of the FAR/AIM. Parts 61 and 91 are a good place to start, as well as learning the proper terminology. Go take a Discovery flight too.

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  11. kckndrgn

    kckndrgn

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    I started going for my license when I was in high school. I went through a local "Civil Air Patrol" group. See if you can find one, you may get disounted lessons, I know I did. I got just past my solo flight and ground school before a doctor grounded me for an operation, never went back :(
     
  12. Burncycle

    Burncycle

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    I'd like to get my private pilots license as well, and eventually instrument rating. Thinking of starting with light sport pilots license first since the hours will eventually contribute towards a private pilots license and it's a few thousand cheaper.
     
  13. PhotoFeller

    PhotoFeller

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    There is a simpler option for getting started that is less expensive, quicker and less demanding for achieving a solo license. There is a civilian flying program that results in a 'recreational pilot's license'. It's a step below a private pilot's license. After achieving the rating, the pilot (1) can fly solo, but can't be accompanied by an unlicensed passenger, (2) can't fly in weather requiring instrument training and (3) must abide by other restrictions not imposed on private pilots; there may be a requirement to stay within a certain distance of the airport you're operating out of.

    In my opinion, this is an excellent pathway to a private ticket. You solo much quicker, you get to experience piloting small aircraft quickly in order to determine if the time and expense of further training is something you really want to do and, you're developing skills that will be necessary to move up to a private rating if you decide to do it.

    Check this program out on line or at your local airport.
     
    Last edited: Feb 12, 2012
  14. firefighter4215

    firefighter4215

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    I never understood the Recreational certificate. 10 more hours of training and you're at the minimum for the Private license. Isn't the minimum flight time for a Recreational certificate 30 hours? It's been quite a while since I've looked up any of this stuff.

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  15. cowboy1964

    cowboy1964

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    Nothing that flies is going to have zero monthly maintenance. It's like a car or a boat, but MUCH more expensive. Plus you have to store it somewhere unless you are lucky enough to have a strip in your backyard.
     
  16. cowboy1964

    cowboy1964

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    [ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O55VBmBM35I"]Commander Ken Wallis flying his gyrocopter - YouTube[/ame]

    If this ain't fun I don't know what is.

    [ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=058NelwSkkw&feature=related"]Gyrocopter stunt - Flying at very low level in FULL-HD - YouTube[/ame]
     
    Last edited: Feb 13, 2012
  17. SPIN2010

    SPIN2010 Searching ...

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    On the move ... again!
    It is all fun and games until the gas bill comes due from fuel delivery ... SHTF! :shocked:

    R22/R44 pilot here. I survived.
     
  18. wrenrj1

    wrenrj1

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  19. Kieller

    Kieller

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    $8K is a similar number that I have been quoted by instructors to get your private license. I am looking to do this eventually and own my own plane. That is several years down the road though unfortunately.
     
  20. emt1581

    emt1581 Curious Member

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    Watched that video for the gyrocopter...interesting as a flying machine but not as much utility as a plane in regard to passengers, distances, cargo, etc.


    Thanks

    -Emt1581