Anybody still use code?

Discussion in 'The Okie Corral' started by alphacat, May 29, 2004.

  1. alphacat

    alphacat account deleted

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    I have been thinking about learning code and buying some sort of low power radio to see how it works out for me.

    N8ZWM
     
  2. uhlawpup

    uhlawpup Cittadinanza Italiana

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    Radiotelegraphy is, at least to me, one of the most satisfying and fun forms of communications. Perhaps it's the historical aspect, or the sense of accomplishment I feel at having learned it, but I do so enjoy it. A big plus is that, in poor conditions, it is one of the easiest ways to communicate.

    I could go on, but try it yourself. There is an easy way to learn it that worked for me and many I have taught it to. Let me know if I can help.
     

  3. therealmarauder

    therealmarauder

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    i use it exclusively on anything less than 6m. there are too many "hey 4 rodger" cb'rs out there for me when the FCC lowered the liscensing requirements. i also try to spot those that are using computers to send and recieve CW and won't talk to them. :) i may be young but i believe in the old ways of ham radio.
     
  4. 40SX

    40SX

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    It took me 5 tries to be able to pass the 20 WPM code test back in 1999, which then was needed to have an extra class ticket. After that day of the exam I never looked back and been clutching a microphone ever since. Don't get me wrong I think code should continue as part of the ham radio exam, but to each his own. There is such a thing as making it too easy to achive something. Every day I hear people on the ham bands that don't know the difference between a resistor and a diode, and would'nt know which end of a soldering iron to pick up until it's too late. ;Q
    ;l
     
  5. Mass10mm

    Mass10mm Armed Yankee

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    Even though my old Speed-X semiautomatic keyer is gathering dust, and I've been using the mic for most of my 35 years on the air, I find one great utility from knowing the code: airplane navigation. I'm a private pilot, and I'm delighted that VHF omni radios (VOR's) transmit their identification in Morse code. The translation is printed on navigation charts, but it takes a bit off my workload not to have to look up the code as I'm trying to fly to a point in space defined by the intersection of two different VOR's.
     
  6. alphacat

    alphacat account deleted

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    Thanks for all of the information.

    I think it might be worth my while to learn code and give it a try.

    I ordered a code practice tape from the local Library to help me learn and I'm going to look around for some low cost radio and key to buy.

    I got my license years ago at a work friend's urging, which I did, and then just as I was getting my license she and her boy friend changed jobs and moved away. I never got a radio hooked up and I have never talked the first word on air.....

    I still have my license and I was thinking code would be fun and cheap to get into.

    Now I'm retired and I need something to fill the void.


    Thanks again....
     
  7. Guest

    W1AW has regular code practice sessions on most HF bands.

    See: http://www.arrl.org/w1aw.html

    However, the best "practice" is to actually listed to ongoing QSO's. You'll notice a myriad of "fists" on the air, some easy to copy, some more difficult. If you can copy the "bad" fists, you'll be able to copy anything. After a while, you'll be able to tell who's using a bug; who's using a straight key; and who's using a keyer.

    Hand CW communication is fast becomming a lost art. You can purchase hardware at most Ham Radio suppliers, which will read code for you, and will send code via a keyboard. Hell, you might as well stay on the side band portions of the bands.

    For me, CW is fun. The low ends of the bands are less crowded, and you can usually complete a QSO even when conditions are bad.

    Take a look on EBay for tranceivers. They are plentiful, and fairly inexpensive. If you're just into listening (for now) you can get away with a fairly inexpensive wire antenna. You might also want to look around your area for Ham Clubs. That's usually a good place to meet folks, and get help when needed.

    Good luck!
     
  8. 00Buck

    00Buck

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    I use it more than anything else. I was fortunate enough to get started young and could do 30WPM in NTS nets passing traffic when I was 13. I think it gets quite a bit harder to learn as you get older. When you can break through 15WPM or so it gets a lot more fun. I used to hang around with a guy who could do 35 WPM easily and hold a conversation at the same time. It is a lot more efficient and will get through when nothing else will. I worked all continents except Antarctica with 2.5 watts and a dipole in a weekend once.
     
  9. alphacat

    alphacat account deleted

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    Thanks.

    I ordered a code tape from the local Library and I will try my best to learn code.

    Now if I can find a cheap radio set-up...

    I've got a 2m handheld all I need for that is a new battery.

    I guess I can do Code on 2m?

    topcat
     
  10. Guest

    It's possible with a 2M handheld, but you are better off with a multi-mode rig (always more expensive!!) Handhelds are ususally FM only.
     
  11. alphacat

    alphacat account deleted

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    Thanks Owl, Just my luck....

    I think I'll give code a try anyway, it will give me something more to drive my wife crazy with...

    Chris
     
  12. therealmarauder

    therealmarauder

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  13. lymph

    lymph

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    I only use code on HF.
     
  14. GSD17

    GSD17 Thread Killer

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  15. Mgdell

    Mgdell Huh??

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    I use CW (code) on HF once a week. We have a net on 3696 on Sunday Mornings @ 8am Eastern time.

    We run around 15-18wpm but will slow down if needed..

    73 de N7LMJ
     
  16. KB4IFS

    KB4IFS MOLON LABE

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    I don't use code much anymore. Last time I used it alot was when I was on VHF. You never heard such a neat sound then the flutter of CW on 2mtr Aurorea. Did anyone catch the 6 mtr opening theis past weekend into the midwest? I made a few for fun from EM93, South Carolina. Using a FT-100D with 100 watts out into a RS discone.
     
  17. grnzbra

    grnzbra

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    ...I had an ancient (it was ancient then)Hallicrafters reciever and a bottom end Johnson CW transmitter. Used a surplus military straight key. In one qso, an old timer ex-merchant marine radio operator told me that I had a great "fist". Talk about making my day.

    Think of it as an art form. You can go to the store and buy a steak or you can take a rifle and shoot your steak. Buying the steak is far more efficient and certainly much much cheaper than shooting it, but there is a certain amount of satisfaction that comes from actually going out and doing it yourself. Now, instead of using your .308 bolt gun, go get that steak with a muzzle loader, or better yet a bow and arrow.

    So it is with CW. This post is quite easy with a computer and with the internet there's no QRM, QRN, QSB etc. And it's as strong on the other side of the world as it is on the other side of town. But it just isn't the same.
     
  18. Caretaker

    Caretaker GO YANKEES!!!

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    Beiong the Test Center Manager of the Connecticut Regional Testing Center where i am licensed by the FCC, W5YI, National Radio Examiners, and ARRL to Administer all levels of both the FCC Commercial RAdio Licenses and the FCC Amateur Radio Licenses. So i have a good idea of what is what. with the advent of computers and cellphones and all the CW Morse Code has taken a beating for to some it is absolete communications. But it is still used alot and is the purest form of Ham Radio Communictions there is, let alone the original means of communications since the 1800's. So it is still used alot just not as popular as it once was is all.

    73 de Kevin N1KGM:) ;f ;f ;f ;f