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Any RN's or LPN's here?

Discussion in 'The Okie Corral' started by w30olds, Aug 8, 2012.

  1. w30olds

    w30olds Magpul whore

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    If so chime in and tell us about your jobs. One of the best nurses I've had was ex military medic. He did an awesome job. Never felt the IV and left minimal brusing. Torn between going back to nursing, or IT school at the moment. Some input from males and females would be awesome.

    Is it harder to get a job being a male in the nursing world?

    Also wanted to ask what do RN's do over an LPN? I know the payscale is better for RN's, but I do see alot of jobs for both.



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  2. AWGD8

    AWGD8 Sr. Glocker29SF

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    Go to Gen. Ultrasound school or Echocardiography.

    Most are associate degree only and yet they start at $27 per hour. You work with a different patient every hour and not stuck with a difficult patient for the whole shift. And did I mention working in the units is a bit messy??. :supergrin:


    Nursing is not a job but a passion.
     

  3. arclight610

    arclight610

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    My wife is becoming an RN. Her uncle is a Nurse Anesthetist and makes six figures. He was also one of those ex-medics you speak of, actually a Navy Corpsman. Her aunt is an NP and makes six figures. I would go straight for the RN, rather than the LPN. The salary difference is huge and LPN severely limits what you can do.
     
  4. Atlas

    Atlas transmogrifier

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    A good friend is an ultrasound specialist (sonographer), highly qualified with multiple certifications (vascular, breast, etc).

    She was out of work for several months. She landed a new job today at a great salary, but it's in the suburbs of D.C.

    All the near-offers she had previously were at a ridiculously low salary.

    She has been a sonographer here in the U.S. for more than five years and was a gynecologist for 20 years in Russia.
    She is extremely dedicated to her profession and quite passionate about it, but she would not tell you that the profession is making her happy.

    She worked her first three years beginning her sonography career as "a travel", short-term temporary, so she worked for a number of hospitals in various parts of the U.S.

    Her experiences working in medicine here in America have convinced me that if I ever become seriously ill I will see a voodoo practitioner first.


    At her recent full-time job she was under intense pressure to conduct every exam in 45 minutes or less.
    That time includes writing the report/study following the exam. It didn't matter if the case was a routine prenatal exam with no complications or whether she discovered evidence of cancer. If she failed to complete the entire procedure in 45 minutes she was put under much pressure and scrutiny by management.


    It was primarily for this reason that she left.
    Only time will tell if her new position will be an improvement in this and other aspects.


    For the education and sacrifices required, I would not consider the average sonographer salary all that attractive.
     
    Last edited: Aug 8, 2012
  5. bmoore

    bmoore

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    Go to nursing school and become an RN. You can work in so many fields an RN. My wife works in the ER. There are so many avenues that you can pursue. Just remember that Paramedics are awesome and nurses wipe butts. Just kidding nurses know a butt load more than medics.
     
  6. NeverMore1701

    NeverMore1701 Fear no Evil Platinum Member

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    I'm probably going back to school for nursing. I like a lot about being an EMT, but the pay sucks (even if I punched on through to medic), and sitting in a baking or freezing (depending on the weather) truck for 12 hours a day sucks even worse.
     
  7. jp3975

    jp3975

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    I looked into it. If you enjoy traveling, become an RN and then do the traveling nurse thing.

    You work 13 week contracts and then go somewhere else or maybe take a break. If you work in cities you can make $80-$100 per hour. There is a small town nearby me where there is a traveling nurse that works 7 days on and 7 off. Makes $50 per hour.
     
    Last edited: Aug 8, 2012
  8. w30olds

    w30olds Magpul whore

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    Thanks for the input guys. I work in health care currently. Home oxygen delivery. I told the manager last month I was returning to nursing school this month. She was ok with it and said she would work with me on the hours and school. Well yesterday she tells me it's not going to work out. After ive signed up for school no doubt!!


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  9. groundhawg

    groundhawg

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    There are good and bad things about Nursing. There definitely needs to be more men in the field. If there was, working conditions would be better and I'm guessing it would be a short time until there was a National Nurse Union. Can you imagine the power they would have.
    It has served me well and is much more reliable and profitable than my former job as an Electrician. Saying all of that, I would second the advice to look into Echocardiography for the very reasons stated.
     
  10. czsmithGT

    czsmithGT

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    What was her experience in practicing medicine in Russia that made her want to leave and work in the US? From my conversations with a dual citizen of US and Russia who spends a lot of time in Russia, the free med care in Russia is a joke and the paid medical care there is totally corrupt. YMMV.
     
  11. devildog2067

    devildog2067

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    People say that about the required education level for just about every job, but the only way to make more money is to acquire more skills and one of the most reliable ways to do that is to get an education.
     
  12. tadbart

    tadbart duuuuude.

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    i took a long and winding path to RN. started off as an EMT, worked the ambulance for about 10 years. near the end of that, i went to LPN school, and worked as an LPN in an ER and in home health as i finished up RN school. currently work in a 30-bed ER on weekend nights. the week is mine, to do as i see fit. i pick up 3 or 4 OT shifts a month, usually 2 of those are as an agency ER nurse in a hospital about 50 miles from home. they pay me $36 an hour just to walk in the door.

    over the years, i've come to realize i don't like drunk a-holes, but i like staring at the same patient for 12 hours even less. in my opinion, there's a place in nursing for just about anybody who has an interest or aptitude.

    i've not had any issues getting a job because i'm a man. in fact, i'd say the opposite. though i wouldn't want to get into a barfight with some of the women i work with, others say it's nice to have someone with a deep voice and a strong back around.

    as an RN, you're in no danger of getting rich, but you can provide a decent life for your family. i buy at least two guns a year, and plenty of ammo to feed them. paid off both my cars, don't owe the college a dime for the education i paid for, and take a decent vacation at least once a year. the education was a good investment for me.
     
  13. k9medic

    k9medic

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    My two cents on this subject...

    I fly an EMS helicopter and work with Flight RN/Paramedics and Flight Paramedics on a daily basis.

    My wife is an RN. She was offered a job at a hospital when she got into nursing school. Started at $44,000 (almost 10K more than she made as a 3rd grade teacher after 10 years). She is now a clinical supervisor at a doctor's office and loves it. She has an LPN that works for her that makes around $32,000/ yr.

    In Florida, LPN's cannot give blood or many IV narcotics unless under the supervision of an RN (depending on the facility). Most hospitals now shy away from hiring LPN's (think Low Paid Nurse). The LPN program is a 1 year program and the RN program is a 2 year program.

    RN's can take an EMT class and then challenge the Paramedic boards too.
     
    Last edited: Aug 9, 2012
  14. jpa

    jpa CLM

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    I've unfortunately had a lot of experience dealing with nursing staff over the last 10 months. Mom's been in and out of the hospital as well as a few trips to the ER and had home health and outpatient care at the hospital and dr offices, including the burn unit at the local hospital. I've found the skill levels, bedside manner and work ethic to vary widely among the nursing staff, even in the same hospital on the same floor. Probably the best and most attentive RN I met was an Ethiopian male nurse at the one hospital. He was in my mom's room every 30 minutes whether she called for something or not. I stepped in the hallway for a few minutes and he was in and out of every room repeatedly. He never gave her attitude, he hung around and talked to her for a while each time, he was friendly and he was very diligent in his documentation and administering meds at the right time.

    On the flipside, at the hospital with the burn unit (mom has a nonhealing diabetic ulcer) the nurses will stand around jawjacking for 45 minutes while patients wait. It's always at least an hour wait before they even call her back and the nurses always whine about how "busy" it is no matter how few patients they have.

    Mom has also had widely varying experiences with home health. She had one RN that was very good and understood the doc's orders perfectly. Then she had another one that started coming that had to call the doc on a Sunday to tell him she didn't have the wound care supplies he ordered and ask him what she should do. He told her to leave the dressing alone and send mom to the hospital to get the dressing changed. Then he went to his office (on a Sunday mind you) and faxed an order to the home health company to discontinue care. She STILL wanted to come out and "look" at the wound anyway. Mom finally told her off and told her not to call again.

    My aunt was a traveling nurse. She did 6 months at a time in various places. She got to pick where she wanted to go (as long as there was an opening) so she went to Chicago, Las Vegas and Nashville). They paid her a per diem, paid for her housing and then paid her salary, which in some cases was up to like $75/hr. She's an RN and has been a nurse as long as I've been alive.

    If anything, I'd say go for the RN and not just LPN. The opportunities and extra pay are worth it. I looked at the HR web sites of all the local hospitals here and they ONLY want RNs. I asked my aunt about the traveling nurse thing and she said the opportunities she got wouldn't have been available to her if she wasn't an RN. She also said get experience in a lot of different areas. Work an ER, work a rehab floor, work in the ICU (especially cardiac icu), get some pediatric experience, etc etc. The more areas you've worked in and the more different types of care you're experienced in giving, the more valuable you are as a nurse.

    I say go for it. My HS football coach and chem/bio teacher was a male nurse. He said it's an easy way to meet chicks when you're the only guy on the floor who can pick up patients by himself. ;)
     
  15. kewa0501

    kewa0501

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    New Male RN here. I did an internship in a level II trauma center and will be starting in a small 20(ish) bed Level IV trauma center as my first RN job.


    I always steer people away from tech jobs. I started school for Nuclear Medicine but thinking about doing almost the exact same thing for the rest of my life and some of my family's prodding pushed me to nursing school.

    If your a person that actually cares about people and you thrive in tough situations requiring lots of critical thinking do nursing. Many different jobs. My long term plan is to work 3 years in this ER, go to an ICU, put in my 2-3 years and either go for CRNA or get on a helicopter as a flight RN.

    When I get the stupid out I would like to do disaster preparedness for hospitals.

    Nursing needs men, especially if your a veteran. We think much differently than women and handle things in a different manner. Hospitals and schools scream diversity and whats more diverse than a male nurse? Not much....


    to answer your questions:
    RN's will be paid more than LPN's will. Greater responsibilities. Getting a job may be hard for the first job. I sent out over 300 applications and only got 15 interviews.

    There is money in it and satisfaction that many people won't get in their daily jobs.
     
    Last edited: Aug 9, 2012
  16. Pentothal

    Pentothal

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    I'm an RN on an oncology/nephrology floor. I'm paid around $20 base. This is my 5th year. Love the job though I'm overworked, under-paid and under-appreciated (by administration and some patients). Pay in the area is low for nurses and lowest at this hospital. For comparison I have a masters degree in psychology, about ten years ago I had a job that required my level of education. The job payed $25K that equals $12.05 an hour for a masters level employee. As a CNA I was getting $12/hr to pass water, do vital signs and clean people up.

    My wife is in an ER. Her base is $10 more. She has traveled and made a killing as compared to local wages.

    Together we do okay and only work 3 days a week doing something we enjoy.
     
  17. Paul53

    Paul53 All in all I'm just another brick in the wall.

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    Male RN, former EMT. 25 years in ER's. Teaching hospitals and level 1 trauma centers are great places to work. You learn the newest stuff available.

    Being male opens more doors, not less. The starting pay is good, but they have what's called "wage compression." Top pay isn't tremendously higher than starting pay. Get some experience, certifications (like Certified Emergency Nurse, Critical Care RN, etc) work nights, weekends and holidays and you can haul in 70k/year or more.

    Pay varies greatly by region and doesn't always reflect cost of living.
     
    Last edited: Aug 9, 2012
  18. nursetim

    nursetim

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    Just so you know jpa, I am a traveling NP and I don't make near what your Aunt reports. Maybe it is the company I work for, probably is.


    But compensation stories like yours are common. When I delivered pizza, all the other drivers has scantily clad nymphomaniacs answer the door, it never happened for me though.

    Good luck with whatever you decide but be advised there are easier ways to make a living, so if you are doing it for money or job security, your life will suck. Just saying.
     
  19. jp3975

    jp3975

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    Must be the company. A nurse told me several months ago that there was an opening in Vegas for $80 per hour. I hear $50 is the low end of the hourly pay.

    As a nurse practitioner you should be making 6 figures.
     
  20. Atlas

    Atlas transmogrifier

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    She left for personal reasons unrelated to her professional life.
    She has much to say about the differences in the medical profession in Russia vs. the U.S.
    Pros and cons in both directions, naturally.