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Any others truck drivers on GT?

Discussion in 'The Okie Corral' started by AKRover, Aug 7, 2012.

  1. AKRover

    AKRover 10MM Fanatic

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    I am a truck driver and hoping to get opinions from other drivers. Since I got my CDL in 2006 I have primarily driven tankers of various sorts. Usually I haul fuel or other hazmat. The only since I started driving truck that I haven't driven a tanker was a six month period where I was driving a small flatbed, but still carrying hazmat.

    Anyway, I have been trying to break away from tankers and hazmat and try something new in the driving world. I'd really like to get into heavy haul but anything other than tankers seems to be difficult for me to get into. Don't get me wrong, I enjoy the challenge of tankers and hazmat but a change would be nice.

    Have any of you other drivers experienced anything like this? I feel like I've become a specialist without intending to.


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  2. Lone Wolf8634

    Lone Wolf8634 :):

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    18 years OTR. Mostly flatbed. I also drove HZ tankers here in Wyoming quite a bit. I've also done various HH over the years.

    Having been a tanker driver for so long, you're gonna need to get some experience driving flats before anyone will even think of putting you under a 12 ft wide, 100ton+ load, IMHO driving a regular flatbed is one of the most complicated driving jobs there is, increase the size and weight of the load, add axles, tags, jeeps and specialized equipment to the mix and the difficulty increases exponentially.

    This is why you hardly see really young or new drivers in a heavy haul outfit.

    From what you describe, you have all the necessary experience to be snapped up by a really good company. Tankers ain't the simplest job in the industry either.

    If you want my advice, Anderson Transportation Service (ATS) out of St. ClouD, MN would be a really good place for you to learn, they run a variety of trailers, from regular skateboards to RGN's and large heavy haul, as you gain experience, they increase your challenges.

    Good luck.
     

  3. Bill Powell

    Bill Powell Cross Member CLM

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    So, you wanna stay in Alaska.
     
  4. Resqu2

    Resqu2

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    I drive a Toyota Tacoma, how can I help? :rofl: have you though about the ice roads? Looks fun and challenging and it seems like your in the right area.

    BTW, stay safe out there, a real good friend crashed a gas tanker and had to run several rescuers off before it blowed and killed them all. He was trapped and knew they couldn't free him in time :crying:
     
  5. AKRover

    AKRover 10MM Fanatic

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    I actually spent this past winter out on the real ice that go across the Arctic Ocean. I was driving a fuel truck out there and had fun but ready for something different. Currently I'm driving an aviation fuel truck at the Deadhorse/Prudhoe Bay airport.

    I am undecided about staying in Alaska at this point. All my family has moved to the lower 48 so being closer to them would be nice. The closer winter gets the better going somewhere warmer sounds but right now I'm not in a position to make the move without a job lined up. I would even consider a job hauling fuel if I thought it could lead to something else down the road.


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  6. Jake514

    Jake514

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    I do like to drive, and there was a time I could not understand why everyone did not drive for a living.

    I hauled steel, freight, oversize permit loads, etc. all over the US & Canada for many years, but got tired of being on the short end of the stick 98% of the time. Today time schedules are more compressed, more things competing for driver's attention, etc. so I am glad I made the move to go school and learn a skill.

    The most interesting were the long length permitted loads where you would be escorted by retired mechanics, etc. One pickup truck with signs/flashers ahead, one behind loaded with chain saws, motorized metal saws, etc. The long loads would require a wide tail swing and they would cut off the conflicting signs, tree limbs, etc. ahead, I would pass, then they would weld the signs and posts back on.
     
  7. TKM

    TKM Shiny Member Lifetime Member

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    Just another ball of mud.
    I push a Freightliner around San Diego.

    This year it rained once, but I made it through okay.:tongueout:
     
  8. kd8x

    kd8x

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    I ran a tanker hauling fuel and gas in the Charlotte market for 12 years...Now hauling freight in doubles and home everynight and not looking back.....stay safe:supergrin:
     
  9. .264 magnum

    .264 magnum CLM

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    Can trucks go over the bridge to Coronado? If so have you don that? It freaks me out in a car.
     
  10. G17Jake

    G17Jake

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    North Dakota has been booming in the oil fields. There may be a job for a truck driver with tanker experience. I don't know how much warmer it is though.
     
    Last edited: Aug 7, 2012
  11. Ferdinandd

    Ferdinandd

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    Flatbedders are a different type of driver. The work is more physical, and load securement is a big part of the job. The pay is usually better too; frequently a percentage of the load, even for when driving a company tractor. If you have a good record now, you could get on with a good national size carrier, get excellent training and learn the business. TMC provides great training, and they have nice equipment - Pete 379's, I think. I have contacts at several flatbed companies in different regions and can provide additional direction. If interested, send a PM.
     
  12. Calicowboy

    Calicowboy

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    I used to-- now i drive a cab an get to go home at night!
     
  13. TKM

    TKM Shiny Member Lifetime Member

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    Just another ball of mud.
    Depends on the load. No flammables / corrosives or explosives on Coronado Bay Bridge. (Otherwise, route is Terminal Access.)

    It is actually a pretty cool drive, sitting way up top gives you a great view.

    The scary(haz) stuff has to go down to IB and come up the Silver Strand.

    Then there is base security. Always fun when you've got a commitment time.
     
  14. tsmo1066

    tsmo1066 Happy Smiley

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    Used to drive HEMTTs in my early days in the Army hauling rocket pods, but these days the biggest thing I get behind the wheel of is a Toyota Tundra.

    Sorry, I'm no help to you.
     
  15. larry_minn

    larry_minn Silver Member Millennium Member

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    Can't offer much help. Did short stint OTR to help a friend who had started his own company/4 trucks/driver troubles.

    Good luck. As said North Dakota is where action is. Neighbors son is referb large tanks for oil fields. One day there was a HUGE LP tank (type) thing on trailer in equipment yard. Now there are 3+ going thru "treatment" with new(old) ones being unloaded and referb ones being loaded/going to oil fields.
    Its been yrs since I drove a semi. Strangly enough I looked at one today, may contact them on prices. (2005 Kenworth with under 400k miles)

    It depends what you want/where you want to be/go. We have a jocky in my area that has (last I recall) 12 tractors, 8 flatbeds, 12 grain trailers, 20 refers... and has a number of Owner/operators working for him. He has talked to me about driving a number of times over yrs. Basicly someone who has a few thousand miles under belt, passes drug test, shows up, stays till job done. Does not steal.....
    They have lots of stories. One guy filled fuel tanks in yard, took extra oil, drove to his home and drained tanks into personal barrel for his dsl pickup. (and oil) Then bought batteries and charged to businsess. (also went in pickup)
    GPS is common. some trucks take (amazing) routes.

    If you go Kenworth I can connect you to a guy who makes a RV out of sleeper. (without a huge weight penality)
    I never drove West. (lower 48) (excluding car/pickup) :) Stuff I heard about Calif... I wanted nothing to do with that state.
     
  16. NEOH212

    NEOH212 Diesel Girl

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    I have a CDL but I work on heavy trucks for a living instead of driving them.

    We always need mechanics. Ever think about turning a wrench instead?
     
  17. Never Nervous

    Never Nervous

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    I hear N Dakota is boom town USA for truckers right now. Trucker told me this today.

    NN
     
  18. AKRover

    AKRover 10MM Fanatic

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    Thanks for all the input. I spent a year working in North Dakota oilfield and got laid off when the work slowed down. It wasn't a bad place and I've definitely considered it but I'm not interested in moving down there. I might move to the lower 48 but I doubt it would be to North Dakota. My current job I work 2 weeks on/2 weeks off schedule and for more to consider a position in North Dakota I'd have to be offered something similar. It would be difficult to go back to working a normal schedule, not that there is such a thing in the oilfield.