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Any formor or current SF soldiers?

4015 Views 79 Replies 39 Participants Last post by  Bullwinkle J Moose
Have this guy who claime he was SF Officer in Vietnam.

Stories do not add up, know there is SF Association, he is not member.

Would assume Army keeps records of those who made it throught training, and graduated.

Looking for Database 1960 - 1964, point me too if it is public domain.
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Military has people doing things that are not exciting, but those are support jobs.

With out the support jobs, military would not work.

this guy who claims to be SF Officer said he also had 130+ jumps in 4 years service.

Seem like a huge amount of parachute jump in for years of military, and two of those in RVN.
Theoretically possible if he just loved jumping. I've never heard of a unit jumping that much. My grandfather did cause he's crazy about flying. Wasn't airborne was a mp jumped once a week 50 times in a year cause he wanted to and they let him. 90 years old no discs left in his back. It was nearly a funeral when he sold his last plane (piper cub) at 84. Man just loves to fly.

I've never in my life met anyone else who jumped more than 20x in a year in the military. Maybe someone on here was a jump instructor and maybe they jumped more? Dunno never really knew any of them.
 

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Let me start with a disclaimer. My biggest claim to fame is being one of the first guys to enlist for 212th Artillery Group at Ft. Lewis, WA., November 1st, 1971. Beyond that, I stuck it out until I retired in 1992. In between, I did the assignments, did the schools, and did the best job I could, so I'm no hero, it was just something I did. All of us have stories we tell. All of us also have stories we don't tell. Those are the stories we share only with the guys who were there.
Special Forces, SEALS, Delta, they're the same as the rest of us. There are stories they tell and others they don't. Most don't go out of their way to advertise their exploits, they don't brag, because in many cases what they do or did we will never hear about. They weren't chosen just for their skills; they were also selected for their ability to keep a secret. They don't need to impress anyone with war stories, because the people it means the most to already know.

I can't prove anything about this guy, but if he has to profess his heroics to anyone who will listen, he's probably not one.
 

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I used a painting contractor who was the real deal. Great guy and ran a good business. Smoked like a stovepipe. Died a few years ago from… yep you guessed it… lung cancer. He never talked about exactly what he did but his wife told my GF he had numerous decorations and pretty bad PTSD. One of his workers knew his history somewhat and said he was a real BA. I don’t know anything about it or what exactly he did but it was supposedly movie-worthy-legendary stuff. He had changed his name legally after service life. He served 20 years total or maybe 25 half if it was additional field work then training others.

He then started his paint contracting business which I think may have compromised his lungs further. He was done and out of the service at age 45 so still a relatively young guy when I met him. Business went kaput after he passed I had not thought about him until I saw this. His wife was Vietnamese. I think she ended up marrying his worker I mentioned above. I do know he knew a lot about guns and helicopters. He carried himself like no one I have ever known since him. He worked twice as hard as anyone else I knew in that business. He was just one of those guys you could see doing that Rambo stuff. He would give you the shirt off his back to help you. They don't make them like that anymore. I met one of his service buddies once and he was a real strange quiet guy. Killers for sure.
 

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Let me start with a disclaimer. My biggest claim to fame is being one of the first guys to enlist for 212th Artillery Group at Ft. Lewis, WA., November 1st, 1971. Beyond that, I stuck it out until I retired in 1992. In between, I did the assignments, did the schools, and did the best job I could, so I'm no hero, it was just something I did. All of us have stories we tell. All of us also have stories we don't tell. Those are the stories we share only with the guys who were there.
Special Forces, SEALS, Delta, they're the same as the rest of us. There are stories they tell and others they don't. Most don't go out of their way to advertise their exploits, they don't brag, because in many cases what they do or did we will never hear about. They weren't chosen just for their skills; they were also selected for their ability to keep a secret. They don't need to impress anyone with war stories, because the people it means the most to already know.

I can't prove anything about this guy, but if he has to profess his heroics to anyone who will listen, he's probably not one.
^^^^^^^^^^
This is the real deal. Just like the guy I wrote about above.
Thanks for your service and yes you are a hero!
 

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That far back, SF was pretty different. What you’d expect to work for verification in the modern era doesn’t really work with those guys. And it’s so far back, who really cares.
Have this guy who claime he was SF Officer in Vietnam.

Stories do not add up, know there is SF Association, he is not member.

Would assume Army keeps records of those who made it throught training, and graduated.

Looking for Database 1960 - 1964, point me too if it is public domain.
 

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I could ask this question down at the VFW. Everybody there was special forces in Vietnam. No doubt 3 or 4 of them could tell me about when they went on secret missions for the CIA with this guy.

EDIT: "VFW" not "FOP" which didn't even make sense.
 
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